Patriot Gauntlet Node Wi-Fi Storage Enclosure Review - HotHardware

Patriot Gauntlet Node Wi-Fi Storage Enclosure Review

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Installing a drive in the Gauntlet Node is quick and easy. All you’ll need is a small Phillips head screwdriver; remove four screws from the back of the Node and slide the cover off. After you install four other screws and rubber spacers into the 2.5-inch drive you’re using, simply connect the SATA cable and lay the drive inside the chassis.


Then, replace the first four screws and cover the holes with the little plastic feet that are included in the box and you’re done. (Patriot threw in two extra screws in case you have butterfingers and lose a couple during the installation process.)


Unfortunately, setting up and configuring the Gauntlet Node is not quite as easy. If you were hoping for a one-touch-and-you’re-connected sort of wireless device here, tough luck.

Once your drive is installed in the Node, you may need to connect the unit to your PC via USB and format your drive. Patriot instructs you to use the NTFS format, although we discovered that at least in one case a FAT32-formatted drive did the trick.

With a properly formatted drive, you can add whatever files you like, and when you’re done, unplug the USB cable and press the WiFi button on the side of the Gauntlet Node to create a hotspot.



Next, use your wireless device of choice to connect to the Gauntlet Node just as you would any hotspot. (Yes, this will kick you off of any other network you’re currently using.) Then, you can open the Node’s Web-based configuration GUI, called “Gauntlet Connect”, by entering “10.10.10.254” into a Web browser. Once logged in to the Node, you can adjust the device’s settings and enable the Internet pass through functionality by using the interface to locate and log in to your existing wireless network.



Gauntlet Connect has four sections: Status, Setup, Network, and Security. The Status area is the default page, and it shows you system information such as the server host name, the Gauntlet Node’s current firmware version, the time and date, and network information. Under the Setup area, you can adjust most of the aforementioned features, including upgrading the firmware, and you can click “Network Connection” and then select your preferred wireless network to reconnect your device or computer to the Internet.



You can adjust the Gauntlet Node’s SSID and account username and password under Network, and all the wireless security settings are available in the Security area.



After you’ve made your choices in Gauntlet Connect, you may still not be ready to access files on the Node. In some cases, you’ll have to manually mount the Node to your network. In Windows, you have to click the Windows button and enter “\\10.10.10.254” in the Search Programs and Files text area and then enter the Gautlet Node’s username and password (both of which are “admin” by default). You can also of course just use Windows Map Network drive functionality. In OS X, you have to click Go from the file menu in Finder, click Connect to Server, and enter “smb://10.10.10.254” when prompted. After you enter the username and password (“admin” again), you should see the Node appear as a drive on your desktop.

    
Example of the Android interface

Unexpectedly, the setup experience is superior on mobile devices. On both Android and iOS devices, you have to enter the Settings menu and manually connect to the Gauntlet Node hotspot, but once you launch the app, reconnecting to your main wireless network is a snap, and thereafter you'll be able to stream media with ease.

    
Example of the iOS interface

The iPad app, it should be noted, was especially snappy and responsive.
 

Article Index:

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WiFi hard drive?

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RTFA or STFU

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Thanks for the nice review and helpful setup screens. Just got the unit a few days ago and the review is spot on, the drive is not perfect, but can be very handy and is perfectly adequate. Also like the review says, battery life did not reach 5hrs when streaming video.  Lasted about 3hrs before it stopped streaming and then flashed a low battery warning on my screen.

I installed an old/spare 200gb drive I had and formatted it once installed in the enclosure. Streaming SD worked just fine on my Tegra 2 based phones and tables, but I needed a Tegra 3 or S4 based device (Nexus 7, HTC One S) to play the 720p vids without stuttering.

Next time we have a long drive or stay at a hotel, my kids can just connect to the Gauntlet and watch all their videos from their phones and tablets. No more, "Dad, can you load this show on my tablet or load this song on my phone?" before we go on a trip. For me, this device is well worth the $99

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I just recently got one of these. While the home use really hasn't impressed me, I'm excited to take it on the road.

I've considered downloading movies for my kid, so on road trips I can hook my phone up to the dvd player in the backseat and she can be entertained for hours. I took a look and found this article and saw the playtime is quite disappointing, however I think this is easily solved by plugging it into a USB charger in a 110v outlet in a car, or just keeping it charged at the office/house. I can't imagine using it much without plugging it in.The upside for me is being able to stream all the music I want, and have a few movies streaming while I'm cruising down the road. Perhaps I'll load it up with some music and give it a test drive on the way to work tomorrow.

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Hexus is having a give away for one these!

http://hexus.net/tech/features/storage/49209-win-one-five-patriot-gauntlet-node-wireless-enclosures/ 

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I saw that earlier too, and happened to learn how many devices can be connected at once, lol.  I own the thing and didn't know how many devices could be connected.

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Yeah 8 devices...
In a family of 6, that's actually not unrealistic to use since most everyone has a cell phone and there are more than 2 computers in the house as well haha 

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