NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448-Core GPU Review

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Just in time for the holiday buying season, NVIDIA is at the ready with a brand new graphics card. Sort of. Today, NVIDIA is announcing the GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores. Some of you may be thinking, “Hey! GeForce GTX 560 Ti cards use the GF114 GPU which offers a maximum of 384 cores!” And you’d be right. This new GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores, however, isn’t built around the GF114 GPU. Rather, the GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores is outfitted with the same GF110 GPU powering the high-end GeForce GTX 570 and GTX 580, but with a couple of its SMs fused off.

There are some other factors that differentiate the GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores from other GF110-based cards as well, but NVIDIA had a bin of the GPUs with 448 cores available and decided to put together a graphics card that would fill the gap between existing GeForce GTX 560 Ti and GeForce GTX 570. Instead of naming the card something like the GeForce GTX 565, however, NVIDIA chose the GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores moniker because the card will be a limited edition. Once the bin of 448-core GF110 GPUs is gone, so will the GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores. NVIDIA is also only offering this card in certain key regions—it won’t be a worldwide release.


Zotac GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448-Core Limited Edition

NVIDA GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 Cores
Specifications & Features


The GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores has—you guessed it—448 CUDA cores arranged in 14 SMs, with 56 texture units and 40 ROPs. The reference specifications call for a 732MHz core clock with 1464MHz CUDA cores. 1.2GB of GDDR5 memory is linked to the GPU via a 320-bit bus and the memory is clocked at an effective 3800MHz data rate. The cards will require a pair of 6-pin PCI Express power leads and support up to 3-way SLI.

As is the case with most NVIDIA GPU releases, however, the GeForce GTX 560 Ti with 448 cores will be offered in overclocked editions by some of NVIDIA’s board partners. The Zotac GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448-Core Limited Edition card you see pictured here is an overclocked variant.

 

 
Zotac GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448-Core Limited Edition

The Zotac GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448-Core Limited Edition strays from NVIDIA’s reference design in that is sports a custom, single-fan cooler and overclocked GPU. The GPU clock is increased to 765MHz with 1530MHz CUDA cores, but the memory clock remains unchanged from the 3800MHz (effective data rate) of the reference design.

As you can see in the pictures above, the card is two-slots wide and features dual DVI outputs along with one HDMI output and one DisplayPort output.

Zotac includes a nice accessory bundle with the GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448-Core Limited Edition as well. Along with the card itself, we found a user’s manual, quick installation guide, a Zotac case badge, two peripheral-to-6-pin power adapters, a VGA-to-DVI adapter, and a driver / utility disc that includes copies of vReveal, Nero Vision Xtra, CoolIris, XBMC, and Kylo. Although not pictured here, we’re told that Zotac GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448-Core Limited Edition cards sold in the U.S. will also include a coupon code for a copy of Battlefield 3. Now that’s one heck of a game to bundle.

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zotac is a awesome card maker. they have really good warranties. If i were in the market for a new GPU ( i have a xfx 6950) i would just spend the money on the 570 or 6970.

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if only a different colorscheme (i know its their style/scheme).

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.

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I'm not comfortable with Zotac either. (past experiences)

But all is not lost, as EVGA is making one of these Hyper enabled 560's too.

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@realneil, MSI is making one too. I've been gravitating towards MSI lately. Here is a review of theirs, I like their twin frozr III cooling solution.

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1790/1/

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i have been nothing but impressed with MSI, granted my experience is mostly with their motherboards.

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i tend to stick with evga gpus. i like the blacked out style much better anyway (just need some black pcb)

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Sweet... Now if only someone was foolish enough to put 2GBs on that; then we'd have a deal-breaker of a card.

I mean EVGA came up with a 2.5GB 570 card (which came with a 560Ti cooler), why can't NVIDIA for at once at least include 2GBs of memory on their reference cards; I mean ATI has them on their cards, and these things with 1.2GB of memory aren't really that future-proof; even if you SLI them. SLI duplicates the scene to both of the cards and then renders them, meaning that you're still going to have 1.2GBs of memory no matter how many cards you put in, and when your playing a graphics intense game, that 1.2GBs of memory can get used up pretty quickly.

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I've never tried Zotac before, but from many reviews I've read they seem to be a good brand. But..would it be worth getting only 1 of these cards?? SLI in the future wouldn't work out too well if you wanted to throw in another cause they would be gone!

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"The performance is just about the same as the GTX 570, so its a good card. I was expecting the price to be lower, but the 570's have gone up a bit to an average of $339, so this card has a good price point for now, and having it capable of 3way SLI was a smart idea."

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