Asus EAH5870 Radeon HD 5870 Review - HotHardware

Asus EAH5870 Radeon HD 5870 Review

3 thumbs up

Like AMD's reference Radeon HD 5870, the Asus EAH5870 card is 10.5" long and features a black fan shroud that encases the entire PCB.

 

The card's cooler has a barrel fan that draws air into the shroud, where it is forced through the heatsink and partially exhausted from the system through vents in the card's mounting plate. Two more small vents at the back of the card also direct some air that's ultimately vented within the system. Overall, the cooling solution is much like the one used on the Radeon HD 4890, although it is somewhat quieter during idle and light-load conditions.

 

The Asus EAH5870 has a stock GPU clock of 850MHz with a memory clock speed of 1.2 GHz (4.8Gbps effective)--that equates to roughly 153.6GB/sec of peak memory bandwidth. By using Asus' SmartDoctor utility, however, significantly increasing both core and memory clock speeds is a definitely possibility. More on that topic in the overclocking section towards the end.

 

As you can see, two 6-pin PCIe power connectors are required for the EAH5870 and outputs on the card consist of dual, dual-link DVI outputs, an HDMI output (with audio) and a DisplayPort output. As is the case with all other Radeon HD 5000 series cards, the EAH5870 supports a variety of triple-monitor ATI Eyefinity configurations by using any combination of three outputs--provided at least one of them is the DisplayPort output.

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One thing I really don't get regarding the testing of any 5870 is this why is the 5890 not included in the tested video cards. I know it is ATI's dual GPU model and we are with the 5870 talking about a single gpu card. However; every benchmarks or card vs card test I have seen has also included the Nvidia 295 card which is dual GPU and was released vs the ATI series 4000 dual GPU card. If we are going to include a Nvidia dual GPU card in a single GPU review why not include the 5890. I mean I know Nvidia has as of now not caught up to ATI, but I really don't care as a consumer, a hardware enthusiast, a gamer or any other name I could be called I want to see whats best. So a review including a Nvidia dual GPU card should also include an ATI Dual piece of equipment as well. To be fair it can include both the 4870 x2 and 5890 dual GPU card as well as the 4850 x2. Then I can make the best decision for what I want and the money I want to spend. Without it I cannot do that; and neither can anyone else, but no one includes all the options available.

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two of these in crossfire would be wazoo,..............Now let's work on the outrageous prices of the damn things.

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I have been having a lot of luck with ASUS + ATi video cards in my builds for customers. They have a well rounded price point and seem very solid. Their drivers however seem to be a bit on the hit-or-miss side, though ATi drivers from AMD's website always work. Only thing that ever got me, and did a good job of it was the fact that ASUS ATi video cards will not run in most ABit motherboards. I was a huge fan of the ABit brand while it still existed so my pair of ASUS 3870x2's would never run on my new motherboard and prompted me to go with another mobo manufacturer. The ASUS 3870x2's were awesome before they were "outdated" and well worth the trouble the build put me through.

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Hey Rapid. To be perfectly honest, I just didn't want to overload the graphs with 5970 numbers, assuming HotHardware readers know the 5970 is more powerful than the 5870.

The 4850 X2 is another story. Since we've alraedy hot 4870 X2 numbers, why muddy the waters with numbers from another card that everyone knows is obviously lower if it doesn't add some unexpected wrinkle to the results?

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Anyway, I just updated the graphs for ya--don't say I never gave you anything. :)

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