AMD Radeon R9 295X2 Review: Hawaii x 2 - HotHardware

AMD Radeon R9 295X2 Review: Hawaii x 2

7 thumbs up

Performance Summary: Before we nit-pick the numbers, let’s be clear: The AMD Radeon R9 295X2 is the fastest single graphics card we have ever tested, by far. With that said, looking back through our benchmark results, the dual-card GeForce GTX 780 Ti SLI configuration put up higher scores, more often than not. However, the Radeon R9 295X2 was able to overtake the GTX 780 Ti SLI setup on a number of occasions, particularly at higher resolutions (like 4K).


The AMD Radeon R9 295X2 - Find It @ Amazon

The Radeon R9 295X2 is easily AMD’s most ambitious dual-GPU powered graphics card to date. Everything about the Radeon R9 295X2 is extreme, from its performance to its aesthetics, and its price. AMD is setting the MSRP on this powerhouse at $1499, with expected availability the week of April 21st. At that price, the Radeon R9 295X2 is more expensive than a pair of GeForce GTX 780 Ti cards. And it’s pricier than a pair of Radeon R9 290X cards too. Strictly looking at performance $1499 is somewhat tough to justify—if you could ever justify the purchase of a top-of-the-line graphics card. If you consider the all-metal construction, lighted logo and fan, and the liquid-cooler, however, it’s easier to understand the Radeon R9 295X2’s price premium. A couple of Radeon R9 290X cards with water blocks, a pump, radiator assembly, etc. would easily surpass $1500. And then there’s the $3000 GeForce GTX Titan Z to consider—that baby commands an even larger premium. We guess what we’re getting at is that we wish AMD was a bit more aggressive with pricing on the Radeon R9 295X2, but in the end it is an ultra-premium product and ultra-premium products targeted at PC enthusiast are always pricey.

Ultimately though, if you’re considering an AMD Radeon R9 CrossFire setup, and are ready to accept the issues associated with running multiple GPUs, the Radeon R9 295X2 is a monster. It’s not quite Radeon R9 290X CrossFire in a single-card form factor, because there’s the liquid cooling setup to consider, but we don’t think that’s going to turn off potential consumers of a card of this type, especially considering how much quieter it can be than a pair of 290Xes. We think AMD’s got some more software tuning to do to get the most out of the Radeon R9 295X2, but that will perpetually be the case with multi-GPU configurations. Here’s hoping AMD remains committed to optimizing the drivers and software for the Radeon R9 295X2 (and CrossFire in general), because this is one of the most drool-worthy graphics cards to ever come out AMD.

 

  • Uber Powerful
  • High Performance
  • Relatively Quiet Under Load
  • All Metal Construction
  • CrossFire on a Card
  • Relatively Quiet, But Not Silent By Any Means
  • Pricey
  • Not Available Yet

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its crazy how, as you crank up the settings.. the performance gap decreases. Other tests Ive seen show it even beats the GTX SLI in some. amazing! Plus, its cheaper than getting SLI titans - by a lot!

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Need to get a killawatt monitor. Like to know how much this cost electricity wise. 

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Didn't know they made kilowatt monitors. What do you use them for?

BTW no need for a kilowatt PSU if you're running one of these. The NZXT Hale 90 v2 850w has a single 12v rail rated at 70A.

Available on the Egg for $160

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817116030

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That's not hard to do because the Titans are for those who do computing mostly and want to have some fun too. It's ultimately a budget compute card that's sort of almost getting up there towards cutting into lower-tier Tesla sales.

It can perhaps sell as a Gamer card for those who's in the middle of deciding they actually want to do productive stuff with that card eventually.

Ultimately, Nvida has created a new niche of buyers more like their workstation audience for growth and profit. It's a clever way of continuing their workstation market dominance (over 80%).

It's for that reason comparing ATI's flagship gamer card to Nvidia's Titan lineup is rather pointless and a bit naive.

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With 1500$ or more i can live more than 2 months and many people could find any other things much more important than this card. Maybe there are some people who can't agree with this but they do not know how hard you work for the money. What could possibly justify the step from a 780 to this?

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Daniel Telea:
What could possibly justify the step from a 780 to this?

Some people have plenty of money.  They can by what they want without feeling the pain. Smile

I ~USED~ to have lots of it when I was working in Aerospace, but I'm retired and on a fixed income now.

I have a budget and I stick to it. That's why two OC-R9-280X cards in crossfire will have to do for me. Also, I bought them second hand and saved a bundle of cash.

Anyways, it's not like I'm suffering.

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it looks like a nice card, but i'm not a fan of the AIO liquid cooling solution, as i would have nowhere to mount it. sell me just the card and save me the money all that cooling costs and i'll use the inevitable koolance or EKWB block to tie it into my existing loop.

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Check the CryoVenom.

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Most decent cases are able to support a rad this size in the rear exhaust position, or in the front panel. And I'm sure in a short while the after market cards will be out for those with custom loops.

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Not sure what you're referring to, Samuel.

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