Wicked Lasers Produces Handheld Beamer That Stretches 85 Miles

Wicked Lasers Produces Handheld Beamer That Stretches 85 Miles

Remember those handheld lasers that you and your buddies used to carry into movie theaters years back in order to annoy the other moviegoers? Boy, was that immature. But boy, wasn't it fun? Lasers have removed themselves from the mainstream, largely speaking, but there's still something quite magical about them. Granted, they aren't our usual beat, but who can resist a frickin' laser that has managed to set a world record?

Wicked Lasers has just introduced the new S3 Krypton, which is waiting on a Guinness Record and can reportedly produce around 86 million lux. That means it's bright enough to be seen from 85 miles away, or beyond the edge of our atmosphere. Yes, seriously! This is the laser you need for that upcoming trip to Vegas! Considering that this beast is 8000x brighter than our perceived notion of the Sun, you'll need to take advantage of the safety goggles that are bundled with the purchase.


Why would you need such a thing? Let's count the reasons: "just because," "you needed a better flashlight for working inside your custom PC case," and "just because." Sound good? The top-end model is on sale for $1000, but wimpier versions can be had starting at $300.

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Thats pretty awesome, wonder how much fun could be had with that.

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Just don't point them at airplanes... It can be distracting for the pilots. The green lasers are pretty impressive though.

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omegadraco:

Just don't point them at airplanes... It can be distracting for the pilots. The green lasers are pretty impressive though.

Or you will end up in jail if they know where it came from. I personally hate them, they are quite a bad thing to have pointed at you when you are flying around. 

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lol...oh, I know better than that. I can be a little crazy at times, but I'm not that crazy. :-)

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erm, is this legal??? lol

"working inside your custom PC case"

Pretty sure the intensity would burn the board haha!

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I have a 1w blue laser from these guys. Thing is pretty scary.

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Probably a good thing to have along on a back-country hiking trip. The ability to attract people's attention from so far away could be a lifesaver in an emergency situation.

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Haha awesome! Do they throw in some x if you buy one of these?

@realneil, you could also blind a bear our mt lion with this thing.

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Drake_McNasty:
@realneil, you could also blind a bear our mt lion with this thing.

No, That's what the 44. Magnum is for.

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"LMFAO,  Drake I was about to say the same thing, although I rather have both along, The laser to light up the sky for search and rescue, just in case my friends and I get lost woods, we dont want to be part of a camp fire story in the future. And the magnum would be more effective to scare the bejesus out of a bear or mountain lion. The lights might irritate the hell out of those Savages, would be kind of hard to point that thing at the eyes of a raging mad ,charging beast, while your hands are shaking in fear."  

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"That means it's bright enough to be seen from 85 miles away, or beyond the edge of our atmosphere."

Oh bullcrap. Laser beams attenuate extremely easily. I'd like to see how they got this number.

Also, lasers make extremely crappy SAR signals. It's a *laser.* You may see the pointer, but seeing the beam is a great deal trickier, especially at range. You'd have more luck starting a forest fire with it, and hoping people saw *that.*

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Joel H:
you'd have more luck starting a forest fire with it, and hoping people saw *that.*

There you go,....raining on our parade,......

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Joel H:
Also, lasers make extremely crappy SAR signals. It's a *laser.* You may see the pointer, but seeing the beam is a great deal trickier, especially at range.

"I disagree. In the forest , especially at night, It would be hard not to get noticed by the high output of light coming from the beams, its too dark out there,  also keep in mind it tends to be foggy in those places, that help the beam to get seen even more. And if that doesn't work, you can point it at a tree or a rock, or the mountains, and it will have a  very noticeable reflection "

 Look at this Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUGck9mNMDA

[View:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUGck9mNMDA:560:349]

 

Joel H:
You'd have more luck starting a forest fire with it, and hoping people saw *that.*

"That , I agree, at very close range, you have a Death Star in your hands, Darth Vader would be jealous. "

Just look at this video, this thing is super dangerous:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myA7AsLrcRo

[View:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myA7AsLrcRo:560:349]

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Wheatley:
"I disagree. In the forest , especially at night, It would be hard not to get noticed by the high output of light coming from the beams, its too dark out there,  also keep in mind it tends to be foggy in those places, that help the beam to get seen even more. And if that doesn't work, you can point it at a tree or a rock, or the mountains, and it will have a  very noticeable reflection "

Right... That video does not show what would happen when it's in a forest. I mean the more power the laser has the brighter and more noticeable it'll be, and keep in mind that lasers also take up more power and you have to take into consideration the fact that you might blind someone if you have the laser up high. A more likely solution is to refract the lasers into smaller bits of light and then spread it into the sky, you'll get noticed and you won't blind any pilots. Though the best possible solution to survive in the forest is to bring some smoke sticks with you; I mean it's usually going to be a different color and it's going to last longer therefore leading to your rescue.

Wheatley:
"That , I agree, at very close range, you have a Death Star in your hands, Darth Vader would be jealous. "

A death star can destroy entire planets. This can only blind pilots, start forest fires, and make precise holes in glass windows... I mean it's only harmful if used improperly, it is dangerous if it's used to commit a crime and stuff.

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TaylorKarras:
and make precise holes in glass windows

Can this light burn a hole in glass? At what range can it do that?

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Haha or you could just mount it to the .44 magnum so you know where you are shooting lol.

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No party poopers can ruin small childrens birthday parties by popping all the balloons from 85 miles away!

Terrorists new favorite method of terrorism, shining this baby in the eyes of air plane pilots in the sky!

Just kidding about all the negativity but this thing should require some sort of license if it really is THAT powerful, its almost a weapon in a way

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Definitely don't see myself using one of these on a day to day basis :P

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really so what is this really good for ? besides irritating pilots and moviegoers ...oh yeah hang on Mr Bear or Mr.Puma while I grab my S3 Krypton laser ..Oh cr^p left it in the car with the Magnum lol

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rrplay:
so what is this really good for?

It's an expensive novelty item with the potential for getting you tossed into jail somewhere,.... (it is a federal crime to point any laser light at any aircraft and they're very serious about enforcement)

It IS powerful enough to burn and damage retinal tissue in people and animal's eyes at close range. And some dumb-azz will most certainly test that theory out on someone or some unsuspecting creature at the first opportunity. (~"Whee! let's BLIND someone!!"~)

As for practical use, I don't know. I doubt it would burst balloons at any range. (and who would want to more than once or twice?) As to my earlier comment about trying to signal an airplane, Joel is right. it's such a tightly focused beam that making it hit the windshield of a passing jet numerous times in an SOS pattern would probably not be possible. Though, I have a few LED flashlights that may be up to the task with low flying planes.

I had an Air Force Fighter Pilot give me a Signal Mirror years ago when I was a kid. (he was dating one of my sisters) It's about 4X6 inches with a see through center spot (for aiming it) that you can use in the daylight to reflect the sun's light as a signal. It was standard issue in the survival kits that were packed into military aircraft in that time. On a sunny day, it's certainly powerful enough to signal aircraft. I keep it stored in my 4X4 Toyota Tacoma in the emergency bag.

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This sounds super dangerous! As most have already mentioned, to do with shining it at airplanes. This "trend" doesn't need anymore help. However, with the high price tag, it would probably be easy to track the buyer (depending on their method of payment), because I doubt many will be sold to "everyday people". (more-so, the type of people who would do this)

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"I disagree. In the forest , especially at night, It would be hard not to get noticed by the high output of light coming from the beams, its too dark out there, also keep in mind it tends to be foggy in those places, that help the beam to get seen even more."

This is me turning my Snark Dial all the way to zero and responding in a straightforward fashion: You've got this dead backwards.

Forget about lasers for a moment and think about the effect fog has on the headlights of a car. Normally, when you turn on your car's headlights, they help you see a significant way down the road. When it's foggy, the area immediately around the lamps is much brighter--but you can't see well at all. This isn't just because fog is difficult to see through, its because the light shining from your headlights is being diffused and scattered into a cloud and kept in your own immediate vicinity. This is also true when driving in snow, or even (very) heavy rain. There comes a point when turning on your high beams is actively self-defeating; it scatters far too much light into your own vision.

A person standing on the road will see a car approaching *much* earlier on a clear night than on a foggy one. True, they may see the diffused cloud of light approaching (and realize what they're looking at) long before they can visually determine that they're staring at a car, but that's a function of your brain interpreting secondary environmental data (the sound of an approaching engine, the knowledge that you're standing in the middle of a road, the rate of approach, and the height of the diffused cloud of light).

In a forest, at night, a foggy night might make it easier for YOU to see your laser, but that's really NOT the point.

If you want another example, think about the signal mirror RealNeil mentions. The point of a signal mirror is that it focuses already existant sunlight into a significantly brighter spot. A green laser pointer is far too small to create a consistent flash suitable for triangulation. 4x6 inches, while small, is 24 inches square compared to a laser diode that's probably less than 1/100 that size.

(The other practical advantage of a sun mirror is that you're focusing daylight into something that stands out still further. There's a reason people don't use conventional spotlights during the day--unless you've got magnesium flares, it's pretty darned hard to create a beam of light that stands out effectively at high noon when signaling a plane or other fast-moving craft.

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