SnapStream Introduces World's Largest DVR

SnapStream Introduces World's Largest DVR

If you thought TiVo or your DVR was cool, you're going to love this. SnapStream has put together a DVR that's capable of recording 50 channels at the same time onto over 100TB of storage. The company is touting this unnamed beast as the "world's largest DVR," and we're inclined to believe them. After all, the storage capacity is equivalent to 326 TiVo Premier boxes.

The unit plugs in with a single coax cable feed from your local cable company and requires two 15amp power plugs and a 10GB Ethernet (or up to 8 bonded 1GB ports) uplink. The unit takes advantage of SnapStream's clustering technology which designates one SnapStream node as the master. The other nodes can be designated to perform a variety of functions.



Recognizing that 100TB of recorded TV isn't useful unless you can easily find and access a clip on demand, the giant SnapStream DVR cluster uses the company's TV search technology which lets you search about 115,200 hours of recorded TV (or about 13 years worth of TV recordings). The DVR also has ShowSqueeze, the company's built-in transcoding feature that lets you take recordings in MPEG-2 and convert them to H.264 or Windows Media formats.

As we mentioned, this DVR doesn't have a name just yet; the company is holding a contest to see who can come up with the best name for it. Although you won't win the DVR (hey – it probably wouldn't fit in your entertainment center anyway), the winning submission will get an Apple iPad 16GB.

For anyone who's attending the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in Las Vegas next week (April 12-15), you can check this bad boy out in person.

Stats Quick View (Maximum Configuration):

Xeon Processors

8

2tb Hard Drives

68

Raw Space

136TB

Raid Storage

102TB

Total Storage 24×7 Recording*

115,200 hours = ~13 Years

Storage Per Tuner

96 Days

*Assuming a recording quality of 2mbit/s.


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Wow. I wonder how much HDTV can be recorded onto that DVR?

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The usual convention is to use a lowercase 'b' for bits, and an uppercase 'B' for Bytes. So, the article should have read "10 Gb Ethernet" or "10 Gbps Ethernet", or "10 Gigabit Ethernet". There is no 10 GB or 10 GigaByte Ethernet in common use.

I'm not sure why they say it requires a 10 Gbps Ethernet uplink, since the article also says it plugs into a single coax cable. Is it not capable of recording the feeds from a standard coax cable? A multistream cablecard can decode up to 6 channels, so they would need 9 M-cards to reach 50 channels, but that seems feasible given the size of their rack.

Perhaps they are assuming the device will be used, not just as a DVR, but as a media server to stream video over the 10 Gbps connection? That seems a good assumption. But then the equipment should have been called a media server / DVR rather than just a DVR.

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I have a theory.

I think the 10Gbps internet cable requirement is due to the fact that users are going to be transferring a lot of video content.

And yeah, some people could use this as a media server if they wanted.

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Users transferring a lot of video content? Over a 10 Gigabit ethernet connection? Maybe you are confused because you wrote "10Mbps", but the article specified (or meant to specify) 10 Gbps. It takes hundreds of (perhaps a couple thousand) video streams to saturate a 10 Gbps connection. That certainly does not make sense for just a few users. But it might make sense if it is a media server with hundreds of users.

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That, or the fact that video content gets transferred a whole lot faster on 10 Gbps.

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SnapStream has put together a DVR that's capable of recording 50 channels at the same time onto over 100TB of storage. The company is touting this unnamed beast as the "world's largest DVR," and we're inclined to believe them. After all, the storage capacity is equivalent to 326 TiVo Premier boxes.

I get that strange assumption that this was made purely for bragging rights. Both for the company and those guys how have to have better stuff than you. You know, that guy in your neighborhood who invites people over just so he can show off his new Yacht or massive home entertainment system. But seriously, the word "overkill" comes to mind, anyone else? 

The unit plugs in with a single coax cable feed from your local cable company and requires two 15amp power plugs and a 10GB Ethernet (or up to 8 bonded 1GB ports) uplink. The unit takes advantage of SnapStream's clustering technology which designates one SnapStream node as the master. The other nodes can be designated to perform a variety of functions. 

I can definitely see the consumers actually reaching for the manual several times during installation, or at least wishing a professional could install this for them. 

Recognizing that 100TB of recorded TV isn't useful unless you can easily find and access a clip on demand, the giant SnapStream DVR cluster uses the company's TV search technology which lets you search about 115,200 hours of recorded TV (or about 13 years worth of TV recordings). The DVR also has ShowSqueeze, the company's built-in transcoding feature that lets you take recordings in MPEG-2 and convert them to H.264 or Windows Media formats. 

I like this feature, it makes spending potentially thousands on this thing so much more worth it (lol?). Now, thinking randomly here, I imagine that bootleggers might glare in awe of tech like this. 

As we mentioned, this DVR doesn't have a name just yet; the company is holding a contest to see who can come up with the best name for it. Although you won't win the DVR (hey – it probably wouldn't fit in your entertainment center anyway), the winning submission will get an Apple iPad 16GB.

Well now, an iPad? Sign me up. 

I always say that the future is here. We just can't afford it yet. Interesting article, I would like to see where this goes in 10 years. 

 

 

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Marius mind putting line break with a few of these "-" or something? xD i can't read your post form the quoted post :D lol

Nice article and great advancement... but what is this use of this? will i really need to record that much tv at a time? :)

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I think it would probably be used by cable companies or networks to record all their programming for a month (cable companies) or years (networks) and sell a service which allows users to search and download or stream programs from this equipment.

 

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Inspector:

Marius mind putting line break with a few of these "-" or something? xD i can't read your post form the quoted post :D lol

Nice article and great advancement... but what is this use of this? will i really need to record that much tv at a time? :)

Sorry, I just type in the HTML that creates the quote, without going further to create who said the quote. Are you viewing this page on something other than a computer? 

EDIT: Oh crap!

I just realized that HTML doesn't work like it should on the front page. Whenever I make my comment I always go through the forums first, instead of the homepage. It looks right on the forums. 

Okay, I get it now. That's what animatortom was talking about when he said copy/paste and spam. I wasn't aware of this until now. 

I guess I'll have to start putting those dashes like you mentioned. 

Sorry about that guys. 

 

 

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one word... EPIC!!!!

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YESSIR!!! I don't need one that big, but if they make one can can do four or five streams of encrypted or unencrypted channels, I'll be looking at it.

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DAMMM ------> or about 13 years worth of TV recordings....my dish network dvr can hold only 160 hours of SDTV recording lol

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well greyad, you can always get a bigger hard drive and flash everything onto the new drive.

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So this is gonna be a hit for those with more money than sense.

On a personal level they are a monument to excess and will give said 'Rich Boys' all the bragging rights they could want.

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Come up with a name for the world's largest DVR and win free Apple iPad. Enter the contest here - http://bit.ly/DVRCONTEST

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