Shuttle Unveils Ion 2-Based XS35 Slimline PC

Shuttle Unveils Ion 2-Based XS35 Slimline PC

Shuttle is primarily known in the PC industry for their small form factor (SFF) PCs. These tiny boxes are still mighty potent, and they're usually geared towards LAN party gamers who don't want to be bothered with taking their full-size rigs on the road. But as with most every other computer maker, Shuttle is evolving, and as the demands shift, production shifts as well.



Announced this week is an all new form factor from Shuttle, one that looks nothing like the rectangular gamer boxes that have made them famous. The Shuttle Barebone XS35 is just 3.3cm thick, making it small enough for just about any application. It could be a perfect carputer, or you could install it behind your flat panel as a covert HTPC. It will be officially unveiled at the CeBIT trade show in March, and it will ship with a 1.66GHz dual-core Atom D510 processor, Intel's NM10 Express Chipset, an NVIDIA Ion 2 graphics chipset (plenty for HD playback) and an HDMI output. Now you're seriously considering that whole "covert HTPC" option, aren't you?

Other specifications include a VGA output, LAN port, five USB 2.0 ports, a multi-format card reader, a 2.5" hard drive an even a slimline optical drive. It's also "passively cooled," which means that it operates in near-silence aside from the HDD noises. Pricing has yet to be revealed, but the new box will be released in Q2 of this year.


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Well I guess if you can fit an operational Dell 11" notebook capable of gaming in it's casing, then this is not absolutely amazing. To tell you the truth it make the Dell unit that much more incredible, and make you wonder why they did not include the same video capability.

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It's not geared towards the gaming segment.

How much does it cost?

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Oh I know it isn't realneil. I am just saying if Dell can do it in a laptop for less than 1000 why not. It very obviously has more room for cooling than an 11" laptop would.

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Dunno realneil, their website is as silent on that matter as is the article. (None of their products lists an MSRP.) I wish that more companies would have the nads to post actual prices.

Of course, this taken to extremes is bad-- think of the CrunchPad debacle-- but if you have a product that's about to hit the shelves, the "second quarter of 2010" being one month away, not posting a price reeks of "let's see what our competitors release and see if we can't undercut that."

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