Shuttle Steps It Up With "Pro Series" Small Form Factor PCs - HotHardware
Shuttle Steps It Up With "Pro Series" Small Form Factor PCs

Shuttle Steps It Up With "Pro Series" Small Form Factor PCs

Demand for small form factor PCs seems to be on the decline in the industry, at least if the mass production of them by mainstays such as Dell and HP are any indication. But just because a fad is transforming into a niche doesn't mean that the upstarts who got them on the map are slowing down. Shuttle is a name that ties closely with the SFF box, and their rectangular cases and XPC machines have been spotted at pretty much every LAN party ever thrown.

We haven't heard much from the company lately, but they must have been saving up for this one: today, the company announced that they're shipping a new "Pro Series," destined to land as workstations with six-core chips as an available option. Without a doubt, these are the most serious Shuttle PCs ever introduced, and if gamers aren't buying SFF boxes, it looks like creative professionals soon will be.

Shuttle's new Pro Series small form factor workstation models, the J1 4100P and G2 7600P, feature dual-core and quad-core processor options like Intel's Core 2 Duo/Core 2 Quad and AMD's Athlon II X2/Phenom II X4. As for graphics, an NVIDIA Quadro FX or ATI FirePro is available, and for the hardcore, a Gulftown six-core chip (yes, the Core i7-980X Extreme Edition) is available. These two new models will begin shipping in the U.S. starting today, with $899 as the base configuration price point.



Shuttle Now Shipping New "Pro Series" Small Form Factor Workstation PC Models With Six-Core Option Coming Soon

Shuttle refreshes its award-winning small form factor workstations with its new Pro Series line, offering dual-core, quad-core, and soon six-core processor options


City of Industry, CA -- April 5, 2010 / ( http://www.myprgenie.com ) -- Shuttle, an industry leading designer and manufacturer of high-performance small form factor (SFF) PC solutions and creator of the XPC, today officially rolled out its new Pro Series small form factor models designed specifically for professional and workstation use.

"Small, yet powerful, Shuttle's new Pro Series small form factor workstations are perfect for professional environments where space matters," said Nicolas Villalobos, Director at Shuttle Computer Group in Los Angeles. "In areas like healthcare and finance where size is important, power is needed, and additional expandability might not be necessary, the Pro Series really shines. Shuttle is still the smallest PC capable of handling standard desktop hardware -- and the fastest one, too."

Shuttle's new Pro Series small form factor workstation models, the J1 4100P and G2 7600P, feature dual-core and quad-core processor options from the Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo and Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad to the AMD Athlon(TM) II X2 and AMD Phenom(TM) II X4 and user choice of NVIDIA(R) Quadro(R) FX or ATI FirePro(TM) professional 2D and 3D graphics cards. A third small form factor workstation model featuring the world's fastest six-core "Gulftown" processor, the Intel(R) Core(TM) i7 980X Extreme Edition, or an Intel(R) Xeon(R) is slated for release around June.

Shuttle workstation solutions are selected by the most power demanding professionals, including those in animation and graphics ( http://us.shuttle.com/Poweredbyshuttle_Animation_Graphics.aspx ), digital signage (http://us.shuttle.com/Poweredbyshuttle_DigitalSignage.aspx ), presentation and broadcasting (http://us.shuttle.com/Poweredbyshuttle_Presentation.aspx ), and working behind-the-scenes in TV and film (http://us.shuttle.com/poweredbyshuttle_TV_Film.aspx ).

Shuttle will begin shipping two new small form factor workstation models directly from its U.S. website ( http://us.shuttle.com ) today, starting at $899 MSRP. For more information about the new Shuttle Pro Series models, visit http://us.shuttle.com/Solutions_business.aspx .
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Only like 2-3 options for the video card... 2 options for the AMD Pro series and 3 options for the Intel Pro series.

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I've seen these things, a computer store not far from where I live use them. They are crazy little things, fitting all that hardware into a small, compact case. 

The thought of cramming high end GPU's and especially the Gulftown 980X is a little hard to fathom given its size. 

But these new SFF's, seem like they could catch on. Since these Shuttles are the size of a woman's purse and has a handle attachment (the ones I've seen), I could really see how it could benefit the workforce. 

However, I don't know how well they would fair in high demanding video compositing. Especially like it advertises. 

 

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I've only seen a Shuttle once and that was when someone brought one to me and asked what processor would work in it. Looking back at that time, it was an interesting little case and how they did the cpu heatsink was neat. Only problem was that it seemed like it would be hard to upgrade unless Shuttle sold a heatsink for a different socket separately. You would also have to buy a motherboard from them. I'm not sure what form factor they were.

 

For SFF computers built for high power, I would suggest building your own. The Silverstone Sugo cases are going to be a bit bigger than these Shuttle cases but you can fit a standard ATX psu and micro-ATX boards. There are some nice 1366 micro-ATX boards out there (like the Asus Gene) that don't skimp out like older micro-ATX boards in the past. Also, for a case like the Sugo SG02 (link), you can fit long video cards.

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The new J1 version (and upcoming J3 version) actually supports mini ITX motherboards should you wish to upgrade -- so it's pretty "future proof".

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With the new J series models, you can also fit dual-slot graphics cards ;)

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As CPU dies shrink heat becomes less of a factor, I can see how these SFF workstations are still in demand. This is kind of like a HTPC they are so powerful and they do not require full size tower. The most heat generating hardware is the GPU and that is becoming less of a factor, at least for ATI cards hint 5 series ;) Also as we migrate more to SSD's that also requires less heat and energy, in turn a little case is all that is needed. We might even see a day when water cooling will be a thing of the past as there will simply be no need for it. I do not want to get ahead of myself but yes small form factor cases are still in demand. It would be great toting one of these around to different LAN parties it would be like packing a PS3 around.

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Kinda reminds me of how SGI tried to create their O2 or the Octane.

I don't know how they would be able to fit a full size 8800 in these things. I am sure that they will be offering some kind of slimmed down low profile cards.

This is an interesting concept. Yet people who need a Workstation, do not want to give up the power for size or upgradability. Most of the ones I know would rather have a huge box behind the desk that works a render at lightning speed and not a cute little box on the desk that works at half the speed. If they are using the older Quadro/Ati Low porfile cards. Then they are not going to be able to handle the next wave of DX11 development. These have the 3700pro wich is a really good card and a bit smaller than an Pro8750 or even an Pro7700. But there is a reason they have come down on price, because the neww ones like the V8800 are coming out.

This is why companies like BOXX still make their cases so huge, so if you want to up to dual 8800's in crossfire mode and liquid cooling, You can! Fitting dual 3750's are ok, yet they dont crossfire. These are probably aimed more towards the Apple artists who are looking for an option that gives them more flexibility.

I am sure these are really good if you are doing Web design or even Graphic design and photography. I checked out the BsG videos, and that guy seems to love it. I guess if you are using Lightwave then it will work just fine. Then again who uses lightwave :P Ok, yeah I use that one as well. But when it comes to characters or games you will want to use Maya or Max. Just like the specs in that 8800 review, some of the low-Pro cards are probably not going to be better than a 5870.

These things are neat, and for desktop modeling and texturing They are probably what you want. Yet like the O2, when the next gen. of tech comes out the GPUs might not fit. Like Sgi a better solution would be a wider and lower box that can fit under the monitor. Or the same Big box's with more efficient cooling at a lower price:)

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