Samsung Reveals Industry’s Highest Density LPDDR2 DRAM - HotHardware
Samsung Reveals Industry’s Highest Density LPDDR2 DRAM

Samsung Reveals Industry’s Highest Density LPDDR2 DRAM

Recently, Samsung demonstrated their very own NFC module. Reports are suggesting that future Samsung smartphones could integrate the feature in order to convert their phones into mobile payment devices. But that's not all; the company is today announced the industry's highest density LPDDR2 DRAM using 30nm-class technology.


As you might expect, this module will be used in high-end mobile applications such as smartphones and tablet PCs, and it couldn't come at a more opportune time. Smartphones and tablets are exploding, and the need for more RAM in less space is definitely real. The new 4Gb LPDDR2 DRAM can transfer up to 1,066 megabits per second (Mbps), which approaches the performance of memory solutions for PC applications. It more than doubles the performance of the industry's previous mobile DRAM — MDDR, which operates between 333Mbps and 400Mbps.

 Starting this month, Samsung will begin sampling 8Gb LPDDR2 DRAM by stacking two 4Gb chips in a single package, as it is expected that 8Gb will become the mainstream density for the mobile DRAM market next year. Until now, an 8Gb (1GB) LPDDR2 DRAM used four 2Gb chips. With the new Green 4Gb LPDDR2, the 8Gb solution offers a 20 percent package height reduction (0.8mm vs. 1.0mm) and will save 25 percent of the power consumed by the previous 8Gb package that used four 2Gb chips. This enables thinner, lighter mobile devices with longer battery life. There aren't any prices, as these will mostly be sold internally to companies who produce the phones and slates that you'll be considering in the next year.

 Samsung Develops Industry’s Highest Density LPDDR2 DRAM Using 30nm-class Technology

Sampling in 4Gb and 8Gb densities

SEOUL, South Korea--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, a global leader in advanced semiconductor technology solutions, announced today that it has developed and started sampling the industry’s first monolithic four gigabit (Gb), low power double-data-rate 2 (LPDDR2) DRAM using 30 nanometer (nm) class* technology in November. The chip will be used in high-end mobile applications such as smartphones and tablet PCs.

    “Samsung will work closely with mobile device designers to bring high-performance, high-density mobile solutions to market as rapidly as possible.”

“The mobile device market is gaining momentum with the advent of tablet PCs, which is adding significantly to the already surging smartphone segment,” said Jun-Young Jeon, vice president, memory product planning team, Samsung Electronics. “Samsung will work closely with mobile device designers to bring high-performance, high-density mobile solutions to market as rapidly as possible.”

The new 4Gb LPDDR2 DRAM can transfer up to 1,066 megabits per second (Mbps), which approaches the performance of memory solutions for PC applications. It more than doubles the performance of the industry's previous mobile DRAM — MDDR, which operates between 333Mbps and 400Mbps.

To accommodate continually diversifying consumer needs for mobile application features, advanced memory chips offering both high performance and high density are becoming essential.

Starting this month, Samsung will begin sampling 8Gb LPDDR2 DRAM by stacking two 4Gb chips in a single package, as it is expected that 8Gb will become the mainstream density for the mobile DRAM market next year.

Until now, an 8Gb (1GB) LPDDR2 DRAM used four 2Gb chips. With the new Green 4Gb LPDDR2, the 8Gb solution offers a 20 percent package height reduction (0.8mm vs. 1.0mm) and will save 25 percent of the power consumed by the previous 8Gb package that used four 2Gb chips. This enables thinner, lighter mobile devices with longer battery life.

Samsung developed a 2Gb LPDDR2 DRAM chip based on 40nm-class technology in February of this year and has been providing that solution since April to cope with the rising demand for advanced mobile DRAMs. With the new 30nm-class 4Gb chip, Samsung will meet the sharply increasing needs for high-density LPDDR2 solutions, as the smartphone and tablet PC markets expand throughout 2011. It also plans to provide 16Gb (2GB) LPDDR2 DRAM by stacking four of the 4Gb chips, as capacity needs continue to grow.

According to iSuppli, shipments of mid to high-end smartphones will increase at about an 18 percent annual rate from 2009 to 2014. This signals dramatic expansion of the mobile DRAM market overall, which may register as much as 64 percent growth in mobile DRAM use during the same period, iSuppli also reported. 
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I applaud Samsung, but there one of the biggest producers in the world. Would DDR3 or 4 not seem a better fit in this specific type of platform. Both specs use less energy, are more easily cooled, and are denser protocols than DDR2 is. With DDR4 I am sure you could do this same amount of memory in 1 chip while using 50% less energy. The energy usage is specifically crucial in a mobile platform, not to mention the performance edge would be readily applicable (faster performance = less energy, and a lower clock creating less heat for the same operation).

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1066Mbits is only 133MBytes. That's about the maximum speed of PCI. The statement that it "approaches the performance of memory solutions for PC applications" is laughable. Either they've left something out completely, meant to refer to hard drives, or are just wonko.

A single channel of 400MHz DDR (very low-end by modern PC standards) offers 3.2GB/s of bandwidth--24x more than what Samsung is claiming. I'm not saying this isn't an advance, I just find the PC comparison rather silly.

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I agree Joel, it doe not make sense really. I mean if DDR4/5 is used on AMD GPU's regularly, and I know DDR6 is developed by no less than Samsung, why not use it where it is most advantageous. A platform such as a mobile phone is perfect, DDR6 could be down clocked well, and is already more efficient as well. So it would still run blazing even down clocked, and is 3 times as efficient as DDR2 energy/heat wise!

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