Samsung Intros Fast, Cheap 256GB SSD

Samsung Intros Fast, Cheap 256GB SSD

Samsung Develops World's Fastest and Largest Capacity 2.5-inch, MLC-based (256GB) SSD with SATA II Interface

Samsung Electronics, the world leader in advanced memory technology, announced today that it has developed the world's fastest, 2.5-inch, 256 Gigabyte (GB) multi-level cell (MLC) based solid state drive (SSD) using a SATA II interface, at the fifth annual Samsung Mobile Solution Forum held here today. Samsung's new 256GB SSD is also the thinnest drive with the largest capacity to be offered with a SATA II interface.

With a sequential read speed of 200 megabytes per second (MB/s) and sequential write speed of 160MB/s, Samsung's MLC-based 2.5-inch 256GB SSD is about 2.4 times faster than a typical HDD. Furthermore, the new 256 GB SSD is only 9.5 millimeters (mm) thick, and measures 100.3x69.85 mm.

Once introduced, the Samsung's 256GB SSD will mark the largest capacity SSD from the global market leader in SSD sales, effectively eliminating density as a barrier to SSD adoption in the consumer space.

"With development of the 256GB SSD, the notebook PC is on the brink of a second stage of evolution. This change is comparable to the evolution from the Sony Walkman to NAND memory-based MP3 players, representing an initial step in the shift to thinner, smaller SSD-based notebooks with significantly improved performance and more than ample storage," said Jim Elliott, vice president, memory marketing, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc.

Through major advancements in proprietary controller technology, Samsung's new MLC 256GB SSD, besides being comparable in speed to an SLC-based SSD, also boasts reliability equal to that of SLC SSDs, with a mean time between failures (MTBF) of one million hours, while costing considerably less. Power consumption is also exceptionally low at 0.9 watts in active mode.

In addition, the drive offers a sophisticated data encryption process that prevents data stored on the SSD from being accessed in an unauthorized manner, even after the SSD is removed from the PC.

Overall, the number of computing units in which SSDs are being offered is expected to increase dramatically once Samsung's previously announced 128GB SSD and the new 256GB SSD are launched. At present, Samsung is actively involved in high-capacity SSD design-in activities for all of the top PC and server manufacturers from the U.S., Asia, and Europe.

Samsung is expected to begin mass producing the 2.5-inch, 256GB SSD by year end, with customer samples available in September. A 1.8-inch version of the 256GB SSD is expected to be available in the fourth quarter of 2008.

According to a Q1 2008 report by the semiconductor market research firm iSuppli, the SSD market will grow at an annualized average of 124 percent during the four-year period from 2008 until 2012. iSuppli now projects SSD sales to increase by an additional 35 percent in 2009 over what it projected last year, 51 percent more in 2010, and 89 percent more in 2011, and continue to show dramatic increases in subsequent years.
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Where is the cheap part? :)
I can sell my whole rig just to get one of these :)

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I agree.  I don't see how it's cheap.  And you guys know how skeptical I am about SSDs.  Cheap for me would be around the same price as 250GB HDDs, which would be $70 tops.  It'll take many years for that to happen.

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I could stack 10 of these in my pc! I know it initialy will going toward the laptop market.It running off Sata11 wonder if it will come to the mainstream in the form of External Sata drive!But I dont see pricepoint affordable for a while! Nevertheless I want one for the speed and durability!

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I've read through the article twice now, and I don't see any expected price point for this, so I'd say you guys need to reserve judgement. Let's not forget that it wasn't so long ago that normal HDDs were more than $1/GB. If Samsung can offer this at even $3/GB (not so far-fetched, given that flash drives have seen about a 75% decrease in price over the past year to year-and-a-half), it's a considerable step forward, away from moving parts and mechanical failure. I'd say we could even see $1/GB in another couple of years. Of more concern to me is they don't note an expected service life. MTBF numbers are misleading to the uninformed consumer, and unreliable, at best, once a product hits mass production.

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all i really want is some 32gb or 64gb ssd at under 120 .. is that so much to ask for?
seems like it :(

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Unfortunately it is.  Just ignore SSDs for now.  I am. =P 

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Price updates anyone? Has it been tested against current hard drives? Does anyone have a relative idea of price per gigabyte?

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Yup..... I knew it the Storage Kings are about to start flipping this. Hard drives are the biggest bottleneck on a PC performance wise and have been forever now. Come on when was 7200 RPM put on the market like 2 decades ago now and 10,000 rpm one decade if not more I need 25000 data through put rate. Then my storage and information can keep up with my 4 core processor ddr3 and top end graphics card and front side bus and still use less energy and create less heat while being totally silent.

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rapid1:
Yup..... I knew it the Storage Kings are about to start flipping this. Hard drives are the biggest bottleneck on a PC performance wise and have been forever now. Come on when was 7200 RPM put on the market like 2 decades ago now and 10,000 rpm one decade if not more I need 25000 data through put rate. Then my storage and information can keep up with my 4 core processor ddr3 and top end graphics card and front side bus and still use less energy and create less heat while being totally silent.


except every test ive seen ssd do WORSE then 7,200 rpm disks

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