RIAA Blasts PCMag.com Over Limewire Article - HotHardware
RIAA Blasts PCMag.com Over Limewire Article

RIAA Blasts PCMag.com Over Limewire Article

Many are concerned about the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA, S.3804), which could potentially make it possible for the Justice Department to have sites removed from the DNS system for doing something as small as linking to a BitTorrent site such as The Pirate Bay, even in the context of an article. It appears that the bill is dead, at least for this session of Congress, but the RIAA has already given us an example what might happen if it were to become law.

PCMag.com, a respected tech journal, wrote about its experience. They described how, after writing an article about the demise of LimeWire (it has since been resurrected), they received a letter from the RIAA and many other signatories that said they were deeply disappointed by the article.

The article, titled LimeWire is Dead: What Are the Alternatives? indeed pointed out alternatives to the P2P service, although PCMag.com did put the disclaimer "PCMag does not condone the download of copyrighted or illegal material" into the article. The execs who signed the letter did not believe that statement rang true, saying "The disclaimer in the first, 'PC Magazine does not condone the download of copyrighted or illegal material,' rings hollow to say the least."

Interestingly, the reason the letter said "the first" is because the letter referenced a second article. That article, however, was written by PC World, which is published by IDG, while PCMag is published by Ziff-Davis.

At any rate, this is precisely the type of thing that could happen more often if COICA were to pass, draconian attempts or even removing sites from the DNS system because they write about something P2P-related or link to a P2P site. By the way, the letter also asked PCMag.com to retract the article. They will not, they say. Here is the full text of the letter.

Music Execs to PCMag
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Translation: Wah. Wah wah wah. If hypocrisy were a disease, the entire RIAA would be dead by now. The concept that it or the MPAA have any moral authority when it comes to stealing artists' blind is hilarious. While it's true that two wrongs don't make a right, the only difference here is that when the music industry steals, they call it accounting.

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>> Many are concerned about the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA, S.3804), which could potentially make it possible for the Justice Department to have sites removed from the DNS system for doing something as small as linking to a BitTorrent site such as The Pirate Bay

Many should be concerned... BECAUSE IT'S ALREADY HAPPENING, EVEN WITHOUT COICA: http://torrentfreak.com/u-s-government-seizes-bittorrent-search-engine-domain-and-more-101126

Congrats everyone: Freedom of speech on the internet is dead. Now the government controls it... with the MPAA/RIAA lobbyists' hands shoved firmly in its backside.

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Whatever happened to such antiquated concepts as freedom of speech and of the press ? The only freedom that now seems to be observed in practice rather than only in pious speeches is one that Thomas Jefferson did not suggest as an amendment to the new US Constitution, namely, the freedom for corporations to hire lobbyists to purchase the legislative branch to enact laws in their special interests, the judicial branch to pervert laws in their favour, and the executive branch to enforce these distortions. And this not merely in the USA, but throughout the world ; here in Sweden we can point to the judgements in the two trials of The Pirate Bay founders as an example of how corrupt and perverted our (in)justice system has become under the influence of these forces....

Henri

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The recording and media distribution markets are just going through there death throes. Being that they are founded on making noise this is the only way they know how to do it.

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rapid1:

The recording and media distribution markets are just going through there death throes. Being that they are founded on making noise this is the only way they know how to do it.

ROFL!!!

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The article I linked has been updated. Apparently the ICE/Homeland security shut down 70+ sites yesterday.

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"The article I linked has been updated. Apparently the ICE/Homeland security shut down 70+ sites yesterday."

Well, that would explain my difficulty getting my bit torrents the other day lol

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>> Well, that would explain my difficulty getting my bit torrents the other day lol

Yeah... but don't you feel safer from terrorism?

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3vi1:

>> Well, that would explain my difficulty getting my bit torrents the other day lol

Yeah... but don't you feel safer from terrorism?

 

Oh yes I sure feel much safer now that my freedom of speech and personal rights to privacy are being slowly pissed away by the very people that are supposed to be protecting them....heaven forbid that a CEO may loose a penny or two. There solution to shut down those sites was much more cost effective to them than pay attorney fees to 'ride the trackers' .

All in all big business as usual and the brainwashing continues.

where's  the enema bag when ya need one.

 

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When theft of copyrighted material becomes so bad that there are no longer gold or platinum albums, then the RIAA can pipe up.  Until then sit down and enjoy your humble pie.  People are tired of hearing you.

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