Nokia Predicts Fast Falling Prices for Windows Phone 7 Devices - HotHardware
Nokia Predicts Fast Falling Prices for Windows Phone 7 Devices

Nokia Predicts Fast Falling Prices for Windows Phone 7 Devices

Fancy a Windows Phone 7 device? Unless you're jonesing for a new smartphone right this minute, you may want to hang tight for a few. Nokia's chief executive, Stephen Elop, made some comments recently that suggest WP7 devices are going to come down in price, and soon.

In negotiating a deal with Microsoft to carry WP7 smartphones, Elop said a key topic was whether or not Nokia could reach "a very low price point," and those talks apparently went well.

"We have become convinced that we can do that very quickly," Elop is quoted as saying by Reuters.


Nokia, the world's largest mobile phone maker by volume, announced earlier this week that it was partnering with Microsoft to offer WP7 devices, effectively replacing Nokia's own Symbian platform and freeing the company to focus entirely on hardware. News of the deal prompted Nokia shares to plummet 20 percent in a knee-jerk reaction, though things could change if Nokia is able to finish hammering out a deal for low(er) priced WP7 phones.

"The conclusion of the agreement will happen, we think, quite quickly, measured in a couple of months; it may be longer, it may be short," Elop said.
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Nokia predicts low win7 phone prices??

might i say, well, no *** Sherlock.... nokias making em in the first place, and they set the prices.... no predicting them.

I predict that the prices will be low... now that makes sense.

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Also, Microsoft's *paying* Nokia (not the other way around) to make Win7 phones. If Microsoft was paying me 100s of millions of dollars to include their OS, I too might be able make the device cheaper for end users.

The idea is to saturate the market with cheap Win phones, lock all the developers in with proprietary APIs, then make all their money back from the users via services once they have a monopoly.

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3vi1 does make a point but I doubt this will have the impact it'll have. I seriously can't think of a way they can lock in developers to use proprietary API's except signing a contract (but I doubt Microsoft will do that, we'll see). In essence they're free to use the other proprietary API that Apple has (the only other manufacture that has a monopoly on the smartphone market.)

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>> I seriously can't think of a way they can lock in developers to use proprietary API's

From Microsoft's developer documentation: "The Windows Phone Application Platform provides two frameworks for developing applications: The Silverlight framework for event-driven, XAML-based application development that allows developers to develop creative mark-up based user experiences. [and] The XNA Framework for loop-based games that enables immersive and fun gaming and entertainment experiences."

Both of those are closed patent-encumbered, Microsoft-only, Windows-only, frameworks. If you write your app with WinPho7 as the primary platform, you're going to have a hell of a time porting it to anything else.

That's the idea:  Get everyone to program within a framework that can be legally obstructed if implemented on other platforms.

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3vi1:
Both of those are closed patent-encumbered, Microsoft-only, Windows-only, frameworks. If you write your app with WinPho7 as the primary platform, you're going to have a hell of a time porting it to anything else.

I get that Microsoft's application platforms are closed-source and Windows only frameworks but it's not impossible to port the program to anything else. I'm guessing it'll be hard but if you have some idea on how the program works in your head then you should be able in theory to recreate the program using that mobile phone's platform/code.

I don't exactly agree with the way developers are locked in (not legally but using a platform which programs will use as a base.) but I don't think that developers will go crazy trying to implement the WPAP on other platforms just to get their programs to work, nor do I think it'll be impossible to port to other platforms with Windows Phone being the main platform.

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>> t's not impossible to port the program to anything else.

It's never impossible. You just have to start from scratch (or at least rewrite large chunks of code, depending on how well you separated your original code from Microsoft's kool-aid) and support the multiple codebases, which most companies won't do if 80% of the target audience is on the original platform. That's why you don't see most games for Windows on Mac and Linux (natively).

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"I doubt this will have the impact it'll have" OK taylor this is about as redundant a statement as you can possibly have.

The thing I see here with this issue is this, a Windows phone just as any other Windows platform has had will in the end lower the price across the board for a device spectrum. While I know that M$/Windows has it's fall backs as well as it haters, but if we did not have them do you really think PC's in general would be as common as they are? The answer before anyone has to even think about it is no.

I know many think M$ is the dastardly villain here, but in the overall case this is entirely not the truth. While I understand they may have shut out or bought out development to a degree in the software spectrum. The thing is would the software spectrum be where it is today without them, and or the PC world as we know it today, the answer again is no it would not.

As far as it goes with my initial line here I was just screwing with taylor. However; I for one think this is good, as it will generalize the market for smart phones more, and also therefore make the devices cheaper. This will of course mean that the device type will become cheaper, and therefore more widely used, and in the end will at a faster pace move the digital world to a wider field, and with the same effect in general make it more available to the common user, or pretty much everyone in the world.

So just as with the PC market in general the usage ratio will grow significantly, and so will the general interest, and therefore the market itself. I am actually also pretty sure this will grow the market, as well as M$, and Nokia's share in it. Because of this the providers will also have to start a price war again for market share, and in the long run we all benefit, whether we like it or not.

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>> The thing is would the software spectrum be where it is today without them, and or the PC world as we know it today, the answer again is no it would not.

I agree. I think we'd be much farther ahead of where we are without Microsoft.

What happened to IE once Netscape was forced out of the picture? What happened to Media Player once RealMedia was made redundant? Windows became stagnant while free operating systems have caught up with and passed it in terms of functionality. Great... we'll be able to run full-blown Windows 8 on ARM devices... We've been doing that with Linux for only the last 11 years or more.

Every product Microsoft makes (with the potential exception of Office) was made "just good enough" to be seen as equal to an alternative solution that they ran out of business with sweetheart tie-in agreements.  Once Microsoft owns a market, they let it rot while they move into another market.  Only free alternatives that they can't kill, like FireFox, have been able to jar them to occasional action.

>> in the long run we all benefit, whether we like it or not.

Yeah, we'll be able to buy OS upgrades for our phones for the low low price of $120.  Actually, we'll probably just never see our cell bills go down, since Microsoft will charge us each month with negotiated payments from the carriers (that we'll have to pay even if we want to use a different OS on our phone).

I'm just not seeing the benefit of being a Microsoft supporter for the end user when they use their money, overly general patents, and distribution deals to run everyone else out of the market rather than competing on features.  We benefit from competition, not manufacturer deals that kill off competition (Meego).  I'll bet more than a few people are frightened about what Elop might do next, to sabotage Qt.

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