NYC Subways Land Plan To Have Mobile And Wi-Fi Signals Underground

New York City's subway system is certainly a boon for locals and tourists alike, and while it's old and oftentimes late, the network of stops is impressive. But, there's one complaint that has grown more and more direct as the digital world has grown: there's, like, no signal down there. Exiting the street and heading down into an NYC subway station means that your phone signal is all but dead, and local government has been working to fix that. This week, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced today that 30 additional subway stations now have wireless voice and data communication capability allowing New York City subway riders to make and receive cell phone calls, send and receive texts and e-mail and access Wi-Fi underground. Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) officials were joined by executives from Transit Wireless, AT&T, T-Mobile USA and Boingo Wireless to demonstrate the new capability at the City's busiest station, Times Square.

"This goes beyond providing cell service underground. It brings our customers a new level of security –with the ability to dial 911 in an emergency," said Governor Cuomo. "Customers now know that when they see something, they can now say something using their device to call 911. And now with all the major carriers on board, the vast majority of MTA customers will have the ability to do so." Representatives from Verizon and Sprint were also on hand to announce that both carriers are finalizing agreements to participate in the network, meaning that all four major carriers are expected to provide cell phone and data connectivity to their customers in underground stations in the first two phases of the project.The 36 stations that are now online have an average annual ridership of approximately 7 million customers per station.


While the network allows full cell phone and Wi-Fi connectivity, enabling voice and data functions such as phone calls, text messages, emails, music and video streaming and more, all underground, it also enables important services that improve safety and security. E911 will allow dispatchers to know when a call is being placed underground and the approximate location of the caller. Employees and first responders will also have enhanced communications capability in an emergency. Transit Wireless and the carriers are paying 100 percent of the cost of the project, estimated at up to $200 million, including the cost of NYC Transit forces that provide flagging, protection and other support services. The MTA and Transit Wireless evenly split the revenues from occupancy fees paid by the wireless carriers and other sub-licensees of the network. Transit Wireless is paying MTA a minimum annual compensation that will grow to $3.3 million once the full build out of the network is complete.
Via:  NYC
Tags:  WiFi, wireless, Subway, nyc, mta

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