Millions Still Not Ready For DTV Transition - HotHardware
Millions Still Not Ready For DTV Transition

Millions Still Not Ready For DTV Transition

The day so many had hoped to put off forever is almost here: June 12. That's the day when all broadcast channels must transition to digital broadcasting and millions of viewers across the nation will end up without TV service. The horror!

While most people — anyone with cable or satellite television, for example — won't be affected, there are an awful lot of people out there who rely on the free broadcast signal that floats through the airwaves for their television service. It's
estimated that fully 2.8 million people who get the basic broadcast channels now simply using rabbit ears or an old-fashioned antenna on their roof will lose that signal come Friday. That's 2.5 percent of Americans with television.

The
digital TV transition has been postponed a couple times, most recently because the federal government ran out of coupons to help folks afford the new equipment they'd need. Interestingly, homes of those who are older than 55 are in much better shape. Only 1.3 percent of those homes will be unprepared come Friday. The under-35 set is in more trouble, with 4.6 percent of those households being unprepared.

It may not be as simple as that, however, as many of those younger households may have chosen to forgo traditional television watching in favor of online viewing through services such as
Hulu or, ahem, BitTorrent.



Albuquerque/Santa Fe is the least ready for the transition, according to the state from Nielsen, with 7.6 of homes unprepared. Providence (Rhode Island)/New Bedford is 100 percent ready. Everywhere else is somewhere in between: New York has 1.3 percent of households unprepared, Las Vegas 2.22 percent, Portland (Ore.) 3.69 and Phoenix 4.16 percent.

Anyone who doesn't want to hook up to cable or satellite (or can't, for whatever reason) has two other options if they want to stick with a TV set - buy a new, digital television or a converter box, the latter of which could be purchased at a discount with those government coupons. You could probably make a nice planter out of your old set.
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See it could have happened months ago and it would not have made any difference...

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Damn straight. Let's stiffle technology even longer so a few percentage of obviously casual TV watchers can get ready for a transition that's been in the works for YEARS.

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I just wish they would get it over with already so people can find something else to complain about.

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I got a phone call from my 75 year old uncle who just woke up this morning, turned on his TV and called me asking what happened to his TV. he's been using rabbit ears on an old 20 inch CRT TV for a at least the last few decades.. Even though i told him about the converter boxes, thefebruary deadline the june 12th deadline numerous times. He's probably even ingored the various tests the local news broadcasts have been doing for a year now. Funny thing is i gave him a converter box coupon back in december which expired in april, now he has to pay full price for the converter box.

 

I see many more like him out there FWIW..

 

 

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Has anyone ever considered that TV just isn't so important anymore? If I didn't have TV anymore I could care less. But take my internet access and I would become quite angry!

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I thought we were switching to digital television?  Wouldn't HD be a different league, I mean it is digital, however the converter boxes are to accept a digital signal, not full blown hd.  Or, did I misread something?  I agree with you Dave, I barely watch tv, maybe when I'm eating breakfast, when I'm home.  The net is my new tv.

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Sorry but DTV sucks. At least with analog if the signal wasnt quite good there would be snow in the picture maybe some static in the audio for a few seconds, but that was fine and is so much more nicer than having the picture break apart and the audio cut out when using digital. When thunderstorms roll through it is impossible to watch any TV, even local stuff. The picture and audio cut out constantly. If anything DTV will cause more problems with people getting information in bad weather.

I would prefer a grainy yet watchable picture with audio on all the time with no cut outs vs DTV with picture scrambling and audio cut outs. And yeah i have known about the DTV transition, but in protest i refuse to buy one of them converter boxes. The coupon program has been crap and $50 bucks for some POS that only cost $2 to make is doing nothing but hurting people that are already in economic distress.

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I have a $30 amplified  antenna hooked up to my HDTV because of the way Time Warner compresses their HD. I get a much cleaner picture over the air with the amplified antenna. Bad weather can be a factor but since my antenna is inside wind doesn't affect it, nor rain/snow but hazy hot and humid in the summer gives me many drop outs. fortunately broadcast TV is showing re-runs during the summer usually.

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No matter how long we waited there would still be some people that just wouldnt be ready. Procrastinators will always wait until they have to do something.

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I'm not ready! oh wait i don't have cable, oh crap i don't want to pay for HD since i got something called INTERNET! YES! i save my self $40 of useless re-runs!

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The only time I even hook up my TV is during football season. The NFL network needs to make their package viewable on the internets and I'd never use a TV again.

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Kiristo:

The only time I even hook up my TV is during football season. The NFL network needs to make their package viewable on the internets and I'd never use a TV again.

Same here. MLB does it. I would even be willing to pay for it. Better than buying the premium sports packages cable offers.

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