LTE Advanced Testing Shows 10x Speed Boost Over Normal LTE - HotHardware
LTE Advanced Testing Shows 10x Speed Boost Over Normal LTE

LTE Advanced Testing Shows 10x Speed Boost Over Normal LTE

Well, isn't this odd? There's 4G LTE and WiMAX rolling out now, and HSPA+ being called 4G by a couple of U.S. carriers. So what's this LTE Advanced all about? Well, that's what is coming even after what's coming next. It's a little confusing, we know. But here's what you really need to focus on: wireless transmissions are slated to get faster, and that's never a bad thing. Ericsson has just demonstrated LTE-A over the air in a mobile environment, and they're seeing speeds of up to 10x faster than commercially available LTE deployments. 10x faster than LTE!

The company expects their equipment to hit deployment by 2013. The system, based on commercial hardware, was operating on a test frequency provided by the PTS. This enabled Ericsson to demonstrate LTE Advanced functionality such as carrier aggregation of 3 x 20MHz (60MHz aggregated) over the air in a mobile environment for the first time. LTE Advanced will further enhance the speed and capacity that will be needed in the Networked Society in the years to come. The technology is compliant with the 3GPP Release 10 global standard. Recently, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) also selected LTE Advanced as one of the technologies that fulfills International Mobile Telecommunication's criteria.

The enhancements introduced with LTE Advanced include carrier aggregation and extended multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) functionality. From a user perspective, this means that information can be retrieved and sent much faster, even when the network is congested. This, in combination with the faster speeds, improves the user experience significantly.


The demo system was based on Ericsson's multi-mode, multi-standard radio base station, RBS 6000. Live traffic was streamed between the RBS and a moving van from which network performance could be monitored. In the demonstration, 60MHz of aggregated bandwidth was used, compared to the 20MHz maximum that is currently possible using LTE. In the downlink, 8x8 MIMO was used.

All that said, we just have to come back to one point: 10x faster than LTE! The future's looking good, if we can find the bandwidth to actually take advantage of all that speed...
0
+ -

5G here we come :P lol there is always going to be new technology on the horizon and it is always nice to see wireless bandwidth moving forward.

0
+ -

5G?!

Don't you mean actual 4G here we come?

Since, you know, LTE-A and WiMAX2 are the actual 4G capible techs.

0
+ -

Right and the data use is only going to grow by 50%, If the US every figures out that the way communications is being handled currently country wide with basically no competition, or at best extremely limited competition these numbers will explode. Just imagine if for 60 dollars a month you could get broadband that is at least 50% faster than is now available in the US, with phone, and TV in the bundle then throw a $40 unlimited (talk, text, and data) smart phone monthly. That is the general pattern in Europe with about 20-30 available carriers/providers for both!

0
+ -

All these advancement but prices just go up. I think im good with useable speed and a cheaper price range. But this is nice anyways :D

0
+ -

So I assume LTE-A also be included in "4G" then. If that's true, it sounds like there might be quite a difference in the low-end and high-end 4G technologies.

0
+ -

8x8 means 8 antennas can receive data at once and 8 antennas can transmit data at once on a single radio.

Wireless is half duplex. You can have 8 stations transmitting data on a single radio and if they are all trying to download/upload crap at the same time, then they will be getting 1/8th of the potential bandwidth(i'm making an assumption of 8 spatial streams, since it is not listed) also not taking into account QoS and such.

To get the full bandwidth capabilities of this, you would need a device with 8 antennas.

And you're gonna need a large band to handle all those 60Mhz Channels. The entire 2.4Ghz band allowed in the US is only 50Mhz wide. Using one of these 60Mhz channels would take up the entire band. The US uses 2 seperate frequency ranges in the 5Ghz band one of which is only 100Mhz wide. You could use 2 Channels without overlap in there... The other range is about 280Mhz wide and you could fit about 5 channels without overlap. Why do channels matter? If you have 2 access point broadcasting on the same channel or overlapping frequencies, you will get interference. So I predict Channel diversity will be an issue unless they can get a huge range of frequencies they can use.

Also the theoretical bandwidth of LTE is about 300 mbps.... so are they claiming they can hit 3Gbps??

The 300mbps claim is using a 4x4 antenna.... so moving to 8x8 doubles that to 600.... then moving to a 60Mhz channel tripples that to 1800mbps. The other 1.66x gain is probably from using 128-QAM

Login or Register to Comment
Post a Comment
Username:   Password: