ITC Says Motorola Mobility Violated An Android-Related Microsoft Patent - HotHardware
ITC Says Motorola Mobility Violated An Android-Related Microsoft Patent

ITC Says Motorola Mobility Violated An Android-Related Microsoft Patent

Motorola has a bit of good news, and a lot of bad news to swallow tonight. The International Trade Commission, which has been super busy of late, has just ruled that Motorola Mobility didn't violate six of seven Microsoft patents. But the bad news? That one. The one they did violate could cause them quite a bit of grief, and we're guessing by the sheer quantity of Android-using companies that have signed Microsoft licensing agreements that Moto will soon be on the hook for some serious dollars. Of course, this is only an initial ruling, so the saga still has room to unfold, but it's certainly not the news Motorola wanted to hear.

That said, they're trying to paint a rosy picture of bad news: "We are very pleased that the majority of the rulings were favorable to Motorola Mobility," said Scott Offer, senior vice president and general counsel of Motorola Mobility. "The ALJ's initial determination may provide clarity on the definition of the Microsoft 566 patent for which a violation was found and will help us avoid infringement of this patent in the U.S. market."

Tough to say if this means anything for Moto consumers in the short term, but so long as a final ruling doesn't impose a ban on the import of devices into the U.S., you should be able to purchase that DROID RAZR free and clear.

Initial Determination from ITC Finds That Motorola Mobility Did Not Violate Six of the Seven Patents

Dec. 20, 2011

LIBERTYVILLE, Ill. - Dec. 20, 2011 - Motorola Mobility Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: MMI) ("Motorola Mobility") today announced that it has received notice that the Administrative Law Judge ("ALJ") in the U.S. International Trade Commission ("ITC") action brought by Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) against Motorola Mobility has issued an initial determination. The ALJ determined that Motorola Mobility does not violate six of the seven Microsoft patents listed in Microsoft's suit. The Company noted that Microsoft had previously dropped two patents from its original case which included nine patents.

"We are very pleased that the majority of the rulings were favorable to Motorola Mobility," said Scott Offer, senior vice president and general counsel of Motorola Mobility. "The ALJ's initial determination may provide clarity on the definition of the Microsoft 566 patent for which a violation was found and will help us avoid infringement of this patent in the U.S. market."

Microsoft continues to infringe Motorola Mobility's substantial patent portfolio and Motorola Mobility has active patent infringement litigation and proceedings against Microsoft in a number of jurisdictions, including the ITC. Motorola Mobility remains confident in its position and will continue to move forward with its complaints.

The ALJ's initial determination is subject to further review by the ITC. The final decision in this case, based on the deliberation of the full ITC, is expected by April 20, 2012. The ITC's final determination ruling would be subject to a 60-day review period by U.S. President Obama. The Company noted that sales outside the U.S. are not within the focus of the ITC.
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God, how I hate patents. I bet a lot of these are BS sa well.

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Yeah mayhem is right. all these court hearings are ridiculous. Will some one please come slap them both with huge fines and tell them to grow a pair.

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