Google Announces It Will Test 1Gb Home Fiber Network - HotHardware
Google Announces It Will Test 1Gb Home Fiber Network

Google Announces It Will Test 1Gb Home Fiber Network

Broadband speeds in the United States have long lagged behind other industrialized nations; the average download speed across the US was 5.1 megabits (mbps) in August of last year. While that's a 45 percent increase over the average download speed in 2007 it's just 25 percent of South Korea (20.4mbps), less than half the speed of Sweden (12.8mbps) and 60 percent as fast as Germany (8.2mbps). Google, like a lot of other companies, wants to see more US citizens have access to higher-speed broadband (or broadband at all)—but unlike most other corporations, the search titan is willing to directly fund efforts to make that happen.



According to an announcement on the Official Google Blog, Google is going to pull fiber to the home of between 50,000 and 500,000 US citizens in several as-yet-unselected test markets. This new network will deliver up to one gigabit per second of bandwidth (the company doesn't state if this refers to download bandwidth or the aggregate of upload/download). Regardless, 1Gbps of bandwidth rather handily outclasses what anyone else around the world is getting—including the South Koreans.

Google states that it will offer this service as a "competitive price," without acknowledging that there's no comparative service with which to price match. The closest equivalent (Verizon's FiOS), costs $144.99 for 50Mbps download/20 Mbps upload. Either certain lucky users in the right test markets are going to get insanely good deals in terms of bandwidth-per-dollar, or Google is going to need to find itself a group of people willing to pay an awful lot of money for a home fiber linkup.

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If you want more information on the program, check the video above. If you're curious about why, exactly, Google is launching this program, the company's blog post lists two main reasons. First, it wants to see what sort of next-generation apps developers and users can create when handed ultra-high-speed bandwidth connections. Second, it wants to test new ways of building fiber networks and pledges to share this information with the world. Once built, the network will be open access—users will be able to choose their ISP and Google has pledged to manage it in "an open, non-discriminatory, and transparent way."

We've previously covered the FCC's current interest in developing a national broadband policy and the funds allocated to do so as part of the federal stimulus package if you're interested in the larger context surrounding Google's announcement.
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Sounds great. I wonder if there will be restrictions on running servers from your home connection?

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Google definitely tries to improve all aspects of our lives. It will be a good deal if this tests in a market that people don't have broadband.

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Gosh, can't imagine why Google might be ticked if someone played PirateBay host. ;)

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TPB would never have their servers hosted in *the* country where the holding corporations make all the IP/copyright laws. They already have enough legal problems as is.

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I am curious to see just how they plan to implement this. They would have to randomly select a town to do this "test" instead of random homes across the country. Hey HH do you think you guys could get a inside tip on where this might be so I can move thereBig Smile

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Hey google is down in Austin... i'm in San Antonio... only 1hr 30mins away... maybe they will swing by this way and hook some of us up with some Fiber ;-)

If you truly could hit 1Gbps... I think a lot of people computers would become limiting factors... Not too many people can hit Write speeds of 125MB/s. Unless the data is Held in RAM until written to the Hard drive... but that increases the risk of Data loss.

The average write speed of an HDD in a persons computer is about 50-60MB/s or 400-480Mbps... about HALF of the bandwidth Google is talking about. They will have to find a market where there are a lot of people running very high end computers.

Like myself :-) I'd be a great test subject lol You hear that google? Hook a brotha up? Go ahead and Send me a Nexus One while you're at it lol

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Thats interesting Gbps fiber to home nice!!!!!!!

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I would love for my community to be picked, but I'm guessing they'll pick a location near one of their Googleplexes.

I can already sense AT&T and Verizon's lawyers working furiously to come with a lawsuit they can throw at Google.

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     I can see that directly gibber. I will bet because it is actually a higher implementation of signal cabling there is not a lot they (At&t, Comcast), will be able to do. If they were going in and using current signal distribution methods it would be valid. However; when the means to the end are basically experimental, there is not much of a way for any company to block it's introduction. At least that's what I would think.

     Some of the comments as well as the trajectory of them is ill based at best. A transmission protocol which serves such a wide band being more than a single computer can handle is correct. However; a network which can handle 2 or 4 times what a single computer can handle, would also be very functional for 2, 4 or more houses as well as operational in an enhanced capability model. Think of Comcast as a model. Over there transmission cabling they enable so much bandwidth for an area of the main transmission lines.

      When the needed bandwidth goes over this transmission ratio then service level to that area goes down (decreased bandwidth and availability for subscribers). However with a transmission media like Gb Fiber that completely dissipates. So if your a company introducing a communications wiring protocol which greatly out performs any competition, and you are doing it in a way like Google as experimental.

     Then the current providers cannot do much about it really. If Google came in and said were gonna do this and annihilate your business as well as business model it might be unfair competition or so looked on by a court of law. When it is "Experimental" it is looked on in a completely different way. The kicker is this though much like the other two companies (At&t/Comcast and Verizon) know, once it is in place there competitors cannot get rid of it. They either match it capability or price wise or loose there business in the area.

     Google is very smart the way they do things. Plus they have a legal team as big or if not bigger than anyone who wants to play. By the time they get to court it will already be where they wanted it to go. Then they can expand and when the other companies complain. They are just enabling greater things for the community or area which has already been shown "experimentally".

     How do you fight that when your transmission method does not match the abilities (This is why At&t as well as the Bell systems exist for those companies nationwide with such a wide coverage ratio). When other companies say Verizon come in and take the area it is just because to the largest percent nothing of that capability and coverage ratio/level exists.

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Rapid I was thinking specifically my own personal situation lol There are many times when i'm the only one on the internet at home lol

I hope they also have excellent latency. That much bandwidth will rarely be used by your average user(unless the couple HD IPTV with it) And if they have poor latency, web browsing will appear to be slow and it would be very good VOIP. But it's google and this is Fibre, so I don't expect that to be an issue, unless they fubar their infrastructure lol.

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I nominated my community :-)

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i did too :D But i don't think the price is going to be low...

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Well darn, I just love living in a rural area

/sarcasm

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Google will be a supplier of TV/Internet/Phone(both VOIP & Cell) soon. mark my words, they keep inching closer and closer to that. Think about this with this kind of bandwidth would you really need cable TV if you could stream all your shows and choose what you wanted ala carte? In other words pay for only what you want to watch when you want to watch it? I have a feeling the end result of that will be lower TV costs for most folks

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I'd rather not give google a direct way to read all of my web traffic. Good idea, but I don't feel like having my traffic being directed by a company who's main finances come from web traffic and advertising.

That being said, I would love to see some competition against cable/sat/fios to drive the prices down.

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Man I should have bought some stock in Google a few years back!

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If you had bought Google or Apple last spring (when the stock market was near it's low) the share prices have tripled since then.

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Although it was still $200+ a share at that time, the only time it was lower than that was during its IPO.

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nelsoncp21:

Man I should have bought some stock in Google a few years back!

My thoughts exactly...

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Yup I nominated mine to and sent county as well as 3 cities near me commercial, technology, and commercial integration departments as well links with an explanation. Heck Arthur Blank ( the Falcons and Home Depot owner live over in the megauberplax Bridgemill, maybe I should drop something in his mailbox) I did install his cable well me and Dennis did anyway. I bet money he could call Goggle personally.

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Yeah buying Google early was a definite AOL move. Google has also split or fragmented a few times as well I think. so 100 shares equal 200-400-800 etc. at 200 bucks a pop for current market value.

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