Fire Hazard Prompts Lenovo to Recall 160,000 All-in-One (AIO) PCs

Fire Hazard Prompts Lenovo to Recall 160,000 All-in-One (AIO) PCs

Don't you just hate it when you're trying to update your Facebook status on your all-in-one (AIO) PC when suddenly it burst into flames? You've never had that happen, you say? And you don't know anyone else who has experienced that either? Fair enough, though Lenovo isn't taking any chances and has decided to voluntarily recall 160,000 ThinkCentre M70z and M90z AIO desktop PCs sold between May 2010 and January 2012.

"Lenovo has determined that due to a failure of the power supply in the affected all-in-one PCs, the system can overheat posing a fire hazard. Lenovo has received two customer reports worldwide of fire that resulted in damage to the PC," Lenovo said.


Faulty power supplies that shipped with certain Lenovo ThinkCentre M70z and M90z all-in-one PCs sold between May 2010 and January 2012 are at risk of overheating and catching on fire, Lenovo says.

If you own an affected model, Lenovo recommends that you stop using it immediately and yank the power cord from the outlet. The company will then provide you with a power supply that purportedly isn't at risk of getting so hot under the collar that it might jump around your living room yelling, "Flame on!," or something like that.

To determine if your particular model is at risk, go here and punch in your machine type and serial number.
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This is going to cost lenovo pretty penny, however its nice to see lenovo doing something about it.

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Nice to see Levono acting before any further incidents happen; just goes to show they're a really respectable company.

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Designers may love the AIO design, but given the engineering constraints, not least with respect to heat dissipation, it's a disaster waiting to happen. Tower designs are far more reliable - and moreover, greatly facilitate updating components when that time comes....

Henri

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To clarify, this recall has nothing to do with the all-in-one design; it's the external power adapter that's faulty.

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Paul, I'm quite aware of that fact ; what I was saying - and I stand by it - was that the AOI design is also faulty, even if it was not the issue in this particular case....

Henri

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I think calling the AIO design "faulty" is a bit of an extreme. I wholeheartedly agree it's not as ideal as a desktop tower in a number of ways, but we've also reviewed several AIO systems that have been well constructed, exhibited adequate airflow, and in some cases, offering bit of easy upgradability. HP's Touchsmart 520 comes to mind as an AIO that we have no reservation in recommending, and in fact earned our Editor's Choice award.

http://hothardware.com/Reviews/Hands-On-with-HPs-Touchsmart-520-AllinPC/

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As Mark Twain noted, «It were not best that we should all think alike; it is difference of opinion that makes horse-races.» I remember, in fact, being impressed by the results shown in comprehensive review of the HP machine that you published back in January, but I also noticed the absence of any temperature measurements. Leaving aside the question of AOIs in general, HP products, both laptops and desktops, enjoy (?) a certain reputation for overheating (I myself have found it necessary to either replace or reball HP motherboards for this reason), so perhaps I'm extra sensitive when it comes to designs in which ventilation concerns can be suspected to have taken second place to aesthetic considerations....

Henri 

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