Canon Introduces 120MP Camera Sensor

Canon Introduces 120MP Camera Sensor

One could say that the megapixel race as we know it is over, or it's at least less of an ordeal now than it used to be. Camera makers cranked up the megapixels as fast as they could for years, but now we've reached somewhat of a peak, or a plateau, maybe. But there's no question that camera makers will continue to push the megapixel envelope, and there are obvious advantages to doing so. Some medium format cameras today have sensors with over 40 megapixels, but that's beginning to sound a little small.

Canon has just successfully developed the world's first APS-H sized CMOS image sensor with 120 megapixels, which is a record for that size. Compared with Canon's highest-resolution commercial CMOS sensor of the same size, comprising approximately 16.1 million pixels, the newly developed sensor features a pixel count that, at approximately 120 million pixels, is nearly 7.5 times larger and offers a 2.4-fold improvement in resolution.  We're talking a staggering 13,280 x 9,184 pixels worth of resolution here.

The new sensor also includes a Full HD video output capability, and it also enables image confirmation across a wide image area, with Full HD video viewing of a select portion of the overall frame. Canon hasn't mentioned when this sensor will be used in actual cameras, but it can't be too long now. We're guessing they wouldn't develop this without some sort of practical application intentions, but who knows how long we'll have to wait to find out for sure.


Canon successfully develops world's first APS-H-size CMOS image sensor to realize record-high resolution of 120 megapixels
      
TOKYO, August 24, 2010—Canon Inc. announced today that it has successfully developed an APS-H-size*1 CMOS image sensor that delivers an image resolution of approximately 120 megapixels (13,280 x 9,184 pixels), the world's highest level*2 of resolution for its size.

Compared with Canon's highest-resolution commercial CMOS sensor of the same size, comprising approximately 16.1 million pixels, the newly developed sensor features a pixel count that, at approximately 120 million pixels, is nearly 7.5 times larger and offers a 2.4-fold improvement in resolution.*3

With CMOS sensors, while high-speed readout for high pixel counts is achieved through parallel processing, an increase in parallel-processing signal counts can result in such problems as signal delays and minor deviations in timing. By modifying the method employed to control the readout circuit timing, Canon successfully achieved the high-speed readout of sensor signals. As a result, the new CMOS sensor makes possible a maximum output speed of approximately 9.5 frames per second, supporting the continuous shooting of ultra-high-resolution images.

Canon's newly developed CMOS sensor also incorporates a Full HD (1,920 x 1,080 pixels) video output capability. The sensor can output Full HD video from any approximately one-sixtieth-sized section of its total surface area.

Images captured with Canon's newly developed approximately 120-megapixel CMOS image sensor, even when cropped or digitally magnified, maintain higher levels of definition and clarity than ever before. Additionally, the sensor enables image confirmation across a wide image area, with Full HD video viewing of a select portion of the overall frame.

Through the further development of CMOS image sensors, Canon will break new ground in the world of image expression, targeting new still images that largely surpass those made possible with film, and video movies that capitalize on the unique merits of SLR cameras, namely their high mobility and the expressive power offered through interchangeable lenses. 
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heh, I think trying to open one of those images would make my laptop explode. I wonder how much a camera sporting one of those would cost.

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Holy crap. That resolution is overkill for any consumer grade products. But I love it.

Does anyone know the approx resolution of the theater screens?

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Well classic movie film is 4k, with theatrical prints we see in theaters about 1.5k and the old IMAX film is estimated at 12k theoretical, with 6k theatrical prints.

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Wow... thats impressive 

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This is very interesting. I will be watching Canon to see what they do with these.

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