Barnes & Noble To Offer eReader For iPad - HotHardware
Barnes & Noble To Offer eReader For iPad

Barnes & Noble To Offer eReader For iPad

Barnes & Noble plans to offer a version of its eReader software designed for the iPad. The eReader will enable users to access more than one million eBooks, magazines, and newspapers in the Barnes & Noble eBookstore as well as content in a user's own Barnes & Noble digital library.

Even though the iPad will compete against Barnes & Noble's own device, the Nook, the bookseller is sticking with its commitment to provide the eReader software for as many screens as possible. Barnes & Noble's free eReader software is currently available for most computing and mobile devices such as the PC, Mac, iPhone, iPod touch, and BlackBerry.

With Apple entering the e-reader space, some book publishers have decided now is the perfect time to challenge the existing paradigm, particularly when it comes to price. For example, Macmillan recently pushed to raise the prices of its ebooks to $12.99-$14.99 from the previous price of $9.99. Although Amazon.com temporarily pulled the publisher's titles from its online store in response to the price increase, the company eventually gave in and said price changes could be the way of the future.

"We will have to capitulate and accept Macmillan's terms because Macmillan has a monopoly over their own titles, and we will want to offer them to you even at prices we believe are needlessly high for e-books," a representative for Amazon.com wrote in a Jan. 31 statement. "Amazon customers will at that point decide for themselves whether they believe it's reasonable to pay $14.99 for a bestselling book."

Apple is reportedly in talks with a number of book publishers and studios for content; it's possible booksellers such as Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble will have to match the terms of Apple's agreements in order to prevent the iPad from making too big of a dent in the e-reader market.

The eReader for iPad software is scheduled to be released around the time of the iPad's availability.
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Barnes and Nobel already offers it for the iPhone so doesn't that app work for the ipad? But glad to see that barnes is not scared of competition.

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Rofl 3vi1; I think your on to something here. It's and Apple Troll! The only thing that interests me with the iPad is to see how it impacts the market, and it's reception. I think really it is far to lacking as a product and machine. I know it has positive points, but as far as I can tell it is basically an up sized iPhone, with to many points missed components wise.

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Hehe... you guys *know* I'm the cynic!

I agree with what Gib said up there though - this *is* a good move by B&N.

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Lol, indeed.

I must confess though, I did click on the link and was sourly disappointed. It does not, as the author claimed, have "all youll ever need fromthe internet." In retrospect, his typo-ridden post should have raised a red flag.

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i went to the link too, its just like another one of those custom Google home pages xD, whats really the use of those links??? i can do the same by bookmarking them! :D

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Anything that runs on the iPod Touch or iPhone will be compatible with the iPad, it'll just look a little blocky while the pixel doubling is in effect. Developers will no doubt come out with iPad-specific versions shortly.

As some of you know, I've been looking for an ereader for a while-- my aging eyes need help when it comes to reading. (Not that that's stopped me completely. I use a magnifying glass and read slowly-- but you're not gonna stop me from reading.)

The question may be moot; I've found one, and it runs on my iPod Touch! (Which of course means that it'd run on the iPhone too, and the iPad. All three will hereafter be referred to as an 'iDevice.") It's the Stanza ereader, by Lexcycle. It's free, and comes with easy downloading of texts, both free and paid. The free libraries include Project Gutenberg, so that's a ton of free content right there.

Stanza is considerably user-friendlier than the Barnes & Noble or Kindle iDevice software. It's like Firefox compared to Internet Explorer. It allows the user to set up the look of the page-- font, size, color of letters and background, indentation, line spacing-- and it does so without interfereing with graphics, if any. There are several other ereaders too, but some (especially the book-specific readers, where each book shows up as a separate app) have disadvantages. (Not the least of which is clutter. With a modest library, say twenty books, you're taking up two screens. Plus some of them use faulty scans and leave text out.)

See, kids, this is why I may buy an iPad. The things that make Stanza good would be better on a larger screen. If I do spring for one, Apple ought to pay Lexcycle a little, because it's a major selling point for me. (Though if I spend that much I'm going to want handwriting recognition, so I don't have to carry my Newton MessagePad as well.)

Stanza does lack a feature or two that would be nice-- such as TelePrompTer-style scrolling-- but for the most part it's more solid than the big players and merely lacks a megacorporation attached to it. I don't consider that a bad thing.

Seriously, if you have an iDevice and like reading, check out Stanza.

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Would be a waste to spend $500 to run an app that's free. Does the stanza e-reader run on Windows as well?

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Hey Clem go check out the Library of congress if you have any interest in history. From what I am hearing they just uploaded and made available the first 60,000 titles. I am pretty sure there free as well. Some are not into history though, so the appeal may not be huge I guess, at least with the general public.

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Thanks, rapid1. I volunteer at the Philadelphia branch.

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"Amazon customers will at that point decide for themselves whether they believe it's reasonable to pay $14.99 for a bestselling book."

I don't know about that...on one hand, I can get a paperback for $8, read it anywhere, etc etc. On the other hand, the first editions are almost always $20-$30 hardcovers, and if the ebook DRM system isn't too intrusive, I definitely would buy ebooks, and then books if I really liked them and wanted to keep them in a collection.

On the topic of the marketing, I agree, it's an excellent idea. Especially since the eReader format is easily converted to pdf: they're expanding their customer base with almost zero effort.

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"We will have to capitulate and accept Macmillan's terms because Macmillan has a monopoly over their own titles,"

uhhh...its called "copyright" ya morons...not a monopoly.

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