Items tagged with vulnerability

With Nintendo's latest game - a mobile one, at that - the company has proven that there is still a lot of innovating to do in the market. While Pokemon GO is based on another title, Ingress, any game is going to have a greater chance of success when it features one of the most popular franchises ever. GO isn't just some regular Pokemon game: it's making the masses realize that augmented reality can be really cool. What's not cool, though, is that popular mobile apps are a hot target for malware. And since Pokemon GO hasn't been released worldwide yet, many have taken to the scarier parts of the... Read more...
It's beginning to look like some rather sophisticated hackers have made their way into Apple's core and crippled iCloud security so severely that some iPhones have essentially been held hostage. A few iPhones here and there might not seem like a big deal, but ultimately, there could be a staggering 40 million iCloud accounts (approximately) at risk here. According to CSO Online, some iPhone users, dating back to February this year, have found their devices compromised, held hostage by Russian hackers. The attack is almost too simple. An iCloud account is broken into (with the help of leaked credentials),... Read more...
We wrote earlier about the kind of success Google has been seeing with its Android bug bounty program -- success that has led the company to actually increase its rewards. Over the years, we've seen other major companies offer bug bounties as well, such as Facebook and Microsoft, so it's clear that they can provide some real value. Could that value be important enough for the US government to get in on the action? It appears that "yes", it certainly can. In a new report from the Pentagon, the groundwork is laid for future programs that target much more than some front-facing websites, which is... Read more...
If you've shopped at Acer's US website at any point between May 12, 2015 and April 28, 2016, you have immediate reason for concern. Acer has just revealed to the California Attorney General's office that its ecommerce servers were hit last spring, and remained vulnerable up until this spring. Unfortunately, this isn't a mere case of someone gaining access to names and addresses - it gets much worse. Acer admits that credit card information could have been fetched by these third parties, which includes not only the credit card number, but also the CCV security code and expiry date. It's not clear... Read more...
It has been suggested that the microprocessors we use each and every day could pack in a bit more than we bargained for; namely, the tools needed for spying or undetectable access. And unfortunately, according to security researcher and developer Damien Zammit, there's a potential reason to be concerned over the "ME" or Management Engine module found in all Intel chipsets manufactured after the Core 2 era. If you've built your own Intel-based PC in recent years, or have at least reinstalled the OS and needed to install all of the drivers on your own, you've probably noticed a piece of software... Read more...
The greatest benefit wireless peripherals offer is what they help cut down on: wires. Fewer wires means that our desktops are easier to keep clean, and we're not kicking wires as often under our desk. It's a win-win overall. Or is it? As with most things convenient, wireless peripherals can suffer exploits just like anything else that's open to a wireless connection. While your keyboard is designed to handshake with an adapter that's plugged into your PC, there's usually nothing stopping the data stream from being intercepted. Though remote, no question, it could be a legitimate attack vector.... Read more...
It's not often that people feel compelled to side with Google on the topic of privacy, but the company's newest CEO, Sundar Pinchai, gives us a great reason to. As Brandon covered in great detail yesterday, Apple has been ordered by U.S. Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym to provide the FBI access to an iPhone 5c that was used by the terrorists in December's San Bernardino shootings - but, there are a couple of problems with that. Apple insists that the backdoor the U.S. government wants doesn't exist, and CEO Tim Cook rages against the idea that his company should build one for any of its products. If... Read more...
If you're surfing the Internet with a browser (a rarity, we know), there's a new bug to be cautious of. With a bit of simple JavaScript, a browser's HTML5 History API can be called upon thousands of times, ultimately causing a meltdown. Of course, a dedicated website (CrashSafari.com) exists to act as a proof of concept, and of course, there are many trolls out there trying to trick you into visiting it. This prank isn't harmful, but it can still be a major nuisance. In a rare case, it could cause you to have to reboot, and almost always, it will cause you to lose your open tabs (unless you have... Read more...
2015 has proven to be a massive year for Adobe's Flash plugin, but for all the wrong reasons. Flash is already infamous for being one of the most vulnerable pieces of software on the planet, but in 2015, 316 bugs were found and squashed. That comes out to about 6 bugs per week for a piece of software that's used by the vast majority of notebook and desktop users. What's most impressive about the sheer number of bugs Flash has is the fact that ultimately, we're dealing with a mere plugin here, not a massive software package. While Flash was once considered "cool", a de facto choice for Web animation,... Read more...
We've talked lots in the past about vulnerabilities that hit home and enterprise routers, but not quite as much about cable modems, where the importance of good security is arguably even more paramount. The reason for that is that most often, customers do not have control over the firmware in such devices. If a vulnerability is found and patched, it's up to the ISP to issue it, automatically. As you might imagine, this could lead to some serious problems if your ISP isn't too on top of things. A great example of this is brought forth by security researcher Bernardo Rodrigues. He found that with... Read more...
Security firm Lookout has just revealed what could be one of the most hard-hitting pieces of malware to ever hit Android. It doesn't have an official name, except to be referred to as "trojanized adware", and right from the top, we can tell you that if you only stick to downloading apps through Google's Play Store, you have nothing to worry about. There are two things that make this piece of malware so severe. First, it's effectively wrapped around legitimate apps. Users can download these, such as Facebook and Snapchat, and install them normally. Nothing will look out-of-the-ordinary, and Google... Read more...
Mere days after it was revealed that crowdfunding website Patreon had been breached, the entire collection of stolen digital goods has been posted online. Making this leak even more severe than typical ones is that not only is user account information included, but so too is some site source code (or potentially all of it), as well as private messages. If the encrypted information can be cracked, that could result in the revealing of social security numbers and tax IDs. Patreon is a website where "patrons" are able to support their favorite content creators with a monthly subscription.... Read more...
Where computer security is concerned, it almost seems like unauthorized access can be granted via an unlimited number of ways. While computer security in the home is obviously very important, having good defenses in the enterprise market is paramount. In some cases, slipping up could result in the loss of millions of dollars, and perhaps result in a major mess to clean up. Keeping up on that security is easier said than done, though. As security firm FireEye reports, there are some layers of security that simply get overlooked far too often, but soon enough, they won't be able to be ignored. In... Read more...
Here we go again. Researchers for Tangible Security have discovered three major vulnerabilities which strike at least three different Seagate enclosures - the Seagate Wireless Plus Mobile Storage, Seagate Wireless Mobile Storage, and LaCie FUEL - equipped with firmware 2.2.0.005 or 2.3.0.014. As these things go, other devices and firmware versions could be affected; these are just the ones the researchers have been able to confirm. The first bug, named CVE-2015-2874, relates to an installed telnet server that grants root access with a default password. If login is granted, havoc can be wreaked... Read more...
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