Items tagged with Router

We’ve reviewed all kinds of 802.11ac routers here at Hothardware, including audacious tri-band routers that look like spaceships, and more pedestrian dual-band routers too. The recently released Netgear Nighthawk X10 is something different though, as it’s the industry’s first 802.11ad router. You may not have heard much about 802.11ad prior to the announcement of this router, so here’s the skinny; in addition to the standard 2.4GHz B/G/N and 5GHz AC wireless, it can also operate on the 60GHz band, which theoretically allows it to deliver up to 7Gb/s of bandwidth across all three bands, hence the... Read more...
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has filed a lawsuit against D-Link alleging that the company's failure to properly secure its line of wireless routers and webcams left thousands of customers "vulnerable to a range" of cyber attacks, including those that turned customers' PCs into major parts of numerous botnets. It is a similar suit to the one that ASUS settled with the FTC nearly a year ago. "Defendants have failed to take reasonable steps to protect their routers and IP cameras from widely known and reasonably foreseeable risks of unauthorized access, including by failing to protect against... Read more...
Linksys has partnered with Rivet Networks, the company behind Killer Networking products, to incorporate the latter's Killer Prioritization Engine into the former's new WRT32X gaming edition router. It is the first router that is purpose built for gamers with Killer-enabled gaming PCs. The pitch is that the WRT32X will deliver the smoothest gaming experience through intelligent optimization of network traffic. "We looked at the router options available to gamers in the market and realized that 'gaming' routers were just standard routers with flashy industrial design or packaging provided as 'gamer... Read more...
Linksys is jumping on the mesh network bandwagon with the introduction of Velop, a tri-band modular Wi-Fi system that can be installed in various mesh configurations. The benefit of going this route versus a traditional router is that mesh networks are designed to eliminate Wi-Fi dead zones, as well as offer fast speeds to every nook and cranny. It is particularly useful for large homes. Each Velop node is itself a tri-band AC2200 devices that functions as a router, range extender, access point, and bridge. Normally juggling so many functions would leave less experienced users scratching their... Read more...
Last week, we brought you information about a relatively easy-to-exploit vulnerability in professional-grade Sony cameras. Now, Netgear is the latest high-profile tech company that is coming under fire for a potentially dangerous exploit that was first reported over four months ago. The vulnerability, labeled VU#582384 by Carnegie Mellon University’s CERT, allows “arbitrary command injection” on Netgear’s R7000 and R6400 routers (using firmware 1.0.7.2_1.1.93 and 1.0.1.6_1.0.4 respectively). According to CERT, it’s possible that earlier firmware for these two routers are also susceptible to attacks.... Read more...
Consumer WiFi router products are generally classified by three major performance characteristics: overall throughput or bandwidth, multi-client performance, and range. Although throughput and multi-client bandwidth has scaled-up nicely over the years, range perhaps hasn't improved quite as robustly and even the most powerful WiFi routers, like Netgear's own beastly Nighthawk X8, with its active antennas, can still leave dead spots in large home or office installations. That's where the recent crop of mesh router technologies, that startups like Eero and Google with Google WiFi, are making significant... Read more...
With Intel finding itself inside most of the world's consumer PCs and enterprise servers, it's begun making a massive push on making sure its chips wind up in all other devices - those that most of us regular folk don't think about. We're talking "edge devices" and "fog computing" hardware. "Edge devices" are those that connect all of our devices, so they can include routers, switches, and so forth. "Fog computing", by contrast, acts as decentralized resource management. An example of fog computing can be seen in Windows 10, which has the ability to serve updates to other PCs in a household or... Read more...
Google is rumored to be launching a number of new hardware products at its October hardware event including new Pixel Nougat smartphones and its Google Home speaker. Rumor also has it that Google plans on announcing a $129 Wi-Fi router at this event. Although the Google Wi-Fi router is shrouded in mystery, a few tidbits of gossip have been recently swirling around the internet. For starters, the Google router is supposedly dual-band, offers AC 1200 speeds, and includes Bluetooth connectivity. It is also expected to have much better range than your typical router, along with the ability... Read more...
Call it a first-world problem if you like, but the larger your home, the trickier it can be blanketing it in wireless connectivity. Dead zones have a nasty habit of popping up in remote corners separated by walls and doors, and that's one of the reasons why your choice in router matters. It's also the main selling point of Netgear's new Orbi Wi-Fi System. There's a lot of fancy marketing speak associated with Orbi but what it essentially boils down to is an easy-to-configure router and range extender (more on that in a moment), the latter of which Netgear calls a satellite. Like Google's OnHub... Read more...
A second wave of 802.11ac wireless routers have begun to appear, and the new must-have feature is MU-MIMO, short for Multiple User, Multiple Input, Multiple Output. We already reviewed the first two MU-MIMO routers we could get our hands on from Linksys and Netgear, and now Asus has entered the fray with a dual-band AC3100 router dubbed the RT-AC88U. This is a flagship router that has all the bells and whistles one would expect at a $300 price point, but it differentiates itself from the competition by offering Link Aggregation and eight LAN ports, which are uncommon features in a consumer-class... Read more...
Internet privacy is kind of like a VCR or CD player, in that one day our kids will ask us “you used to have that?” It’s staggering how much of our online activity is tracked, catalogued, and used for a wide array of purposes, most of them related to commerce. But if you’re a dissident, journalist, someone who lives in a country where the Internet is restricted, or just want to browse the web without being tracked, your options are becoming increasingly limited. It’s likely the situation will only get worse in the future, as companies devise more sophisticated ways of tracking our every move online.... Read more...
The second wave of 802.11ac routers are now shipping, and they offer a tantalizing performance benefit over the previous routers we’ve reviewed (at least with their older firmware) — the ability to broadcast multiple data streams to several clients at once. This technology, named MU-MIMO, which stands for Multiple User: Multiple Input, Multiple Output, is just now starting to roll out, and is different in one obvious way to the previous technology, named simply MIMO. The previous solution was only able to broadcast multiple streams of data, but could only transmit to one client at a time, whereas... Read more...
You read the headline correctly – this is not a review of a Synology NAS, but instead a wireless router. If this sounds unusual to you, you are not alone. Synology is a Network-Attached Storage (NAS) company, or at least it used to be, as it's now taking all its networking expertise and jumping into the router market, and the black beauty you see below is its maiden attempt. Plainly named, the Synology RT1900ac Router, the company’s fledgling entry into this crowded market, is a dual-band AC unit. As you might have guessed, it’s capable of 1,900Mb/s of bandwidth across its 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands,... Read more...
ASUS crafts some of the highest-performing and best-looking wireless routers on the market, but as far as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is concerned, it's also crafted some of the most insecure. The FTC alleges that ASUS put "hundreds of thousands" of users at risk because they were oblivious to some serious security holes that plagued the most important piece of equipment on their network. Some of these issues were tied to cloud software bundled with the router, but that's not all. The FTC mentions that bugs in some router control panels would allow attackers to change settings without the... Read more...
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