Items tagged with Hackers

CareFirst, a Blue Cross Blue Shield health insurer, announced on Wednesday that it was the target of a "sophisticated cyberattack," making it the third major healthcare player this year to suffer a security breach. In this instance, CareFirst estimates that around 1.1 million current and former members and individuals who do business with CareFirst online who registered before June 20, 2014, are affected. The health insurer enlisted the help of Mandiant, a leading cybersecurity firm, to audit its systems for any suspicious activity following the recent hacker attacks affecting other health insurers.... Read more...
Target has reportedly reached a settlement agreement in which it will pony up $10 million as compensation to victims of a massive security breach in 2013. The proposed settlement has to be approved by a federal district court judge, and if it is, individual victims of the data breach could receive up to $10,000 in damages, court documents revealed.Account information for some 40 million credit and debit cards were potentially compromised during the security breach, which occurred between November 27 and December 15, 2013. It was one of the largest of its kind. Hackers are believed to have stolen... Read more...
Uber announced that it suffered a database breach at the hands of hackers last year. The company admitted that about 50,000 drivers may have been affected by the breach and announced that a lawsuit has already been filed by Uber against the as-yet unidentified hackers. “A small percentage of current and former Uber driver partner names and driver’s license numbers were contained in the database,” Uber’s managing counsel of data privacy, Katherine Tassi said in a statement. “Immediately upon discovery we changed the access protocols for the database, removing the possibility of unauthorized access.... Read more...
When the U.S. State Department’s email was hacked back in November, it was a black eye for the government. But, to many of us, this seemed the sort of problem that would be quickly eradicated – after all, our guys are the no slouches when it comes to cyberattacks. But as it turns out, the State Department’s email woes don’t appear to be over, and the culprits have yet to be unmasked.Russia has been brought up as a possible suspect, though the NSA hasn’t (at least, publicly) nailed down a culprit at this point – three months after the hack was revealed to the public. The State Department is still... Read more...
Given the string of success hackers have had with compromising the security of major retailers, it can’t be surprising that hackers have also been targeting more juicy targets – namely, banks. After Russian anti-malware company Kaspersky was brought in to investigate a malfunctioning ATM in the Ukraine, it discovered that a group of hackers had been ripping off banks for the past two years, possibly raking in more than $900 million. The affected banks working with Kaspersky have been keeping quiet during the investigation and it’s possible that even more banks have been breached, but haven’t alerted... Read more...
It's bad enough when you're in possession of a database containing 80 million customer records and it gets hacked. But what's even worse than that is when you fail to encrypt all that data. Such is the unfortunate situation facing Anthem, the second largest healthcare provider in the U.S., and its tens of millions of customers who are potentially affected by a recent security breach. Had Anthem encrypted its records, the stolen data might not be all that valuable to hackers, or at least more difficult to access. But the reason Anthem consciously chose not to encrypt all that data is so that it... Read more...
Last year was a busy one for hackers, and it doesn't look like 2015 will be much different. The latest to get hit is Anthem Inc., the second-largest health insurer in the United States. While investigators are still determining the extent of the breach, it's said that hackers broke into a database containing personal information for around 80 million of the company's customers and staff members. Anthem believes that "tens of millions" of records were stolen from its database, making this one of the largest data breaches ever disclosed by a healthcare firm. Personal information that... Read more...
As unfortunate as it's become, another day in the tech industry means yet another security breach, a startling trend that seems to be picking up in frequency as we head into 2015. This time graphics chip maker NVIDIA was hit. The Santa Clara, California-based company has advised its employees to change their passwords after discovering "unauthorized access" to its network.NVIDIA said it learned about the breach during the first week of December, adding that it involved a number of employee usernames and passwords. At this time, NVIDIA hasn't found any evidence to suggest that any other information... Read more...
It often takes political satire to put situations into perspective, and leave it to the hilarious minds at Saturday Night Live to shining a proper light on North Korea and its involvement in hacking Sony Pictures Entertainment. Actor Mike Myers reprised his role as Dr. Evil, who was none too happy that Kim Jong-un is being lumped together with the world's biggest and most evil super villains. As far as Dr. Evil is concerned, both North Korea and Sony are giving "evil a bad name," something he's obviously qualified to speak about during his repeated attempts to hold the world hostage for millions... Read more...
U.S. officials debated whether or not to officially blame North Korea for a massive cyberattack against Sony Pictures Entertainment, though not for long. President Barack Obama said during a new conference yesterday that the evidence suggests North Korea is indeed responsible and promised a response, one that will come "proportionally and in a space, time, and manner that we choose." Naturally, North Korea is still maintaining that it had nothing to do with the attack, calling the accusations "groundless slander."A spokesman for North Korea's foreign ministry took things to a new level by saying... Read more...
On Thursday, some people visiting a selection of major news websites were surprised by a rogue popup saying that they have been hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army. The attacks seemed to have been focused on North American and British media organizations by the hacker group that is linked to the Assad regime. According to reports from various users on Twitter, some of the affected sites include CNBC, Forbes, PCWorld, The Daily Telegraph, The Independent, and the Chicago Tribune. Visitors are being greeted by a random popup that reads, “You’ve been hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA)” which... Read more...
Government agencies are prime targets for many hackers (particularly those funded by other governments), so it’s not surprising that the State Department was recently attacked. What makes the attack unusual is that it appears to have been successful, with unclassified systems being compromised, including possibly the State Department’s email system. What’s more, the State Department is the fourth government agency to suffer such a breach in recent weeks. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and United States Postal Service and White House have all been disrupted... Read more...
The more time that passes, the more details come to light regarding a major security breach at Home Depot that exposed 53 million customer email addresses on top of compromising 56 million credit and debit cards. There's an ongoing investigation into the incident, and one of the latest tidbits is that Home Depot is placing some of the blame on Microsoft. That doesn't mean Home Depot is absolved of any blame on itself -- the company was slow to address lingering security issues -- though the vulnerability that the hackers exploited was one that existed in Windows. The attackers used a third-party... Read more...
Home Depot disclosed this week that around 53 million email addresses were taken during a recent security breach, which is in addition to the approximately 56 million compromised customer credit and debit cards previously disclosed by the hardware chain. The updated findings are the result of weeks of investigation by Home Deport, law enforcement, and third-party IT security experts, the company said. The stolen email addresses were contained in separate files that those responsible for the breach were able to swipe. However, those additional files did not contain passwords, payment card information,... Read more...
1 2 3 4 5 Next ... Last