Items tagged with DDoS

We recently witnessed a new and disturbing trend in cyber security and that is the widespread hacking of Internet connected devices to initiate DDoS attacks on an unprecedented scale. That is the method that made possible the Mirai botnet that targeted security expert Brian Krebs and his security blog with 620 gigabits per second of traffic, which at the time was a record. It is also what's causing a surge in DDoS attacks, as noted by content delivery network (CDN) Akamai. The CDN made its findings known in a recent security report compiled with data gathered from its intelligence platform. In... Read more...
On Friday, DNS provider Dyn was walloped by a massive DDoS botnet attack which slowed down or completely sidelined major websites like Amazon, Twitter, and The New York Times. The attack was carried out using improperly configured Internet of Things (IoT) devices that were zombified by Mirai malware. In this particular case, however, the majority of the IoT devices used in the botnet were webcams made by China-based XiongMai Technologies. "It’s remarkable that virtually an entire company’s product line has just been turned into a botnet that is now attacking the United States," said Flashpoint... Read more...
So here we go again, another "massive and sustained Internet attack" made possible by a large collection of hacked Internet of Things (IoT) devices, things such as CCTV video cameras, digital video records, all sorts of smart home gadgets with a connection to the Internet, KrebsOnSecurity has determined. This is not the first time it has happened and it won't be the last. The recent attack, an apparent retaliation by WikiLeak supporters after the Obama administration allegedly used its influence to push the Ecuadorian government to cut off Internet access to whistleblower Julian Assange, focused... Read more...
This past week has been rife with controversial news related to the U.S. election. Of course, there is always an inordinate amount of news during an election cycle, but this week in particular began with some big stories. First, the U.S. officially accused Russia for the infamous DNC hack that outed the Hillary Clinton campaign's manipulation of the democratic primary. That was followed by WikiLeaks tweeting out an array of cryptic hashes in preparation for its latest data dump, and later the Ecuadorian government admitting it cut WikiLeaks’ founder, Julian Assange’s, access to the Internet in... Read more...
If the internet was incredibly slow for you this morning when browsing certain websites, or if you were having trouble posting your “wakeup” tweet to Twitter, we now know the root cause. A massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack was carried out against Dyn, which provides DNS service to a number of big name sites including Amazon, Twitter, reddit, Spotify, The New York Times, and Airbnb (among others). The outages seemed to mainly be concentrated around the northeastern United States, with another “hot pocket” of activity centered in Texas. Dyn posted a note to its website earlier this... Read more...
Well, this isn't good. The source code for the botnet that took KrebsOnSecurity down by tapping into an unprecedented number of Internet of Things (IoT) devices has been released to the public. It's availability virtually ensures that distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks equal in size or even larger will follow, creating financial headaches and service disruptions for companies both big and small. Brian Krebs, a renowned security expert and author of the aforementioned blog, recently found his website the target of one of the largest DDoS attacks in history. The massive attack brought in... Read more...
If you thought that the massive DDoS attack earlier this month on Brian Krebs’ security blog was record-breaking, take a look at what just happened to France-based hosting provider OVH. OVH was the victim of a wide-scale DDoS attack that was carried via network of over 152,000 IoT devices. According to OVH founder and CTO Octave Klaba, the DDoS attack reached nearly 1 Tbps at its peak. Of those IoT devices participating in the DDoS attack, they were primarily comprised of CCTV cameras and DVRs. Many of these types devices' network settings are improperly configured, which leaves them ripe... Read more...
The web is becoming the wild, wild west all over again it seems. You could argue the Internet's always been a potentially dangerous place, but with the proliferation of smart devices becoming increasingly commonplace, cybercriminals now have more points of entry into home networks than ever before. Smart home automation gadgets collectively comprise much of what's referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT), and just like your PC, they can be silently hijacked and enlisted into a botnet, a malicious network of systems under the control of a foreign party. Individually, all these smart lighting,... Read more...
Today the bad guys have won. Not the war, mind you, but a skirmish with renowned security journalist Brian Krebs, author of The New York Times bestseller "Spam Nation," a former writer for the The Washington Post, and owner of KrebsOnSecurity, a popular security blog that's no longer live after cloud service provider Akamai gave Krebs just 2 hours to pack his things and leave. Of course, there's more to the story than that. Akamai isn't some evil company secretly working for the bad guys (we hope not, anyway). But it was providing free service to Krebs for his blog. You get what you pay for. In... Read more...
Researchers from the Negev Cyber-Security Research Center at Ben-Gurion University recently released a terrifying piece of news. It explains that if a malicious entity decided to craft malware that infected only a few thousand mobile phones, it would be possible to cripple an entire 911 system. That means legitimate calls couldn't make it through, and staffers manning the lines would be inundated with fake calls. The research published last week reveals that in most states, if as few as 6,000 mobile phones were infected with malware that serves no other purpose but... Read more...
Two 18-year-olds from Israel find themselves in hot water with the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for their alleged roles in running a lucrative attack service called vDOS. They're said to have earned over $600,000 in the past two years by helping customers coordinate over 150,000 Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks.Israeli authorities arrested the two teenagers, Itay Huri and Yarden Bidani, on Thursday as part of an investigation by the FBI. They were questioned and released the next day for what amounts to around $10,000 bond each. Authorities also seized their passports... Read more...
Have you ever seen a dog chase its own tail? That pretty much describes what's going on at BBC News this morning. The site suffered a pretty large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack earlier today, one that knocked out the company's entire network and iPlayer streaming service, causing grief for web visitors who grew impatient with how long it took to restore service. As for the image of a dog chasing its own tail, it's based on BBC's reporting of the situation. The site posted a statement on Twitter in the early morning hours saying it was "aware of a technical issue" affecting its website,... Read more...
If you were having trouble connecting to the PlayStation Network yesterday, you might have the hacking group Lizard Squad to thank. An hour after the group's founder posted to Twitter that "itz bouta rain packets", Sony's "Ask PlayStation" account tweeted that it was investigating connectivity issues. Lizard Squad either delivered on its promise, or is trying to reap the benefits of a major coincidence. Video games are always a hot item on big shopping days like Black Friday, so it can be expected that networks like PSN are going to get hammered simply due to the fact that so many people are trying... Read more...
It's hard to argue that "Internet of Things" (IoT) devices can enrich our lives. From making it easier to moderate temperature in our homes to securing them, IoT is going to be a big part of our future. Unfortunately, that does lead to one problem: as more and more devices get rolled out, the inevitability is that we're going to encounter more and more vulnerabilities. Once such example is with security cameras, of which security firm Incapsula estimates there are 245 million operating around the world. This isn't the first time vulnerabilities have been discovered with such cameras. Back in 2013,... Read more...
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