Items tagged with Chrome

Can I get an “Amen” from the congregation? The planets are aligning and it appears that more heavy-hitters are throwing support behind taking down one the Internet’s greatest villains: Adobe Flash. Back in June, we brought you news that Google would be introducing a new “Intelligent Pause” function to Chrome that would disable all Flash content by default (or give Chrome the option to choose what Flash content is deemed worthy). If for some reason you actually need to access a blocked Flash element on a site, you will have the option to click on the element to re-enable it. Google favors HTML5... Read more...
Chrome on OS X is a battery hog. It’s been known for a while that compared to Apple’s stock Safari browser, Chrome has a tendency to eat up CPU cycles and use excess amounts of memory. Google took a step earlier this month to combat this problem by reining in the much-hated Adobe Flash Player plugin. Using what Google calls “Intelligent Pause,” Chrome can decide for itself whether a particular Flash element is worth displaying to the user. If isn’t, it will be disabled, thus helping to save your laptop’s battery from prematurel discharging. But Adobe isn’t the only party at fault when it comes... Read more...
Just as humans are capable of communicating with each other verbally, what if PCs could do the same thing? That's sort of the idea behind Tone, a Chrome browser extension cooked up by Google that, at this early stage, is pretty rudimentary but also interesting. In its current state, Tone can broadcast the URL of the current tab to any machine within earshot that also has the extension installed. What's the point? Google argues that the simple concept of sharing has become more complex than it needs to be during this day and age of digital devices. Email and chat exist and are great for long distance... Read more...
Google on Wednesday announced that it will actively block Windows and Mac users from installing extensions to the Chrome browser that are not found in the Chrome Web Store. It's the same policy that's been in place for Windows users since May of last year, though Google didn't enforce it for the developer version of Chrome. Now it will, as increasingly complex malware is becoming too big of a problem. "We originally did not enforce this policy on the Windows developer channel in order to allow developers to opt out. Unfortunately, we’ve since observed malicious software forcing users into the developer... Read more...
Developers have a new tool for testing their websites on Chrome for Android, thanks to a Dev channel Google just released. Google has long made the Dev channel available to ChromeOS, Linux, Mac and Windows. Now, Android is part of the crew. The Dev channel ends up being a two-way street. Google gets your direct feedback on its pre-release Chrome features so it can weed out bugs before the version goes mainstream. The benefit for you is that you can see how the upcoming version of Chrome will handle your website. You’ll get an early look at potential problems, but you also get a sneak peek at features... Read more...
It's not too often that Chrome browser updates are particularly notable these days since Google uses a rapid release cycle that sees frequent upgrades. But every once in awhile there's an update that brings something interesting to the table rather than mostly bug fixes. Case in point, Google this week promoted Chrome 42 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac, and Linux, and with the numerical update comes support for the Push API and Notifications API.When used in conjunction with one another, these APIs allow websites to send notifications to Chrome even after closing out the site in question.... Read more...
It's always fun to see which security flaws get exploited at Pwn2Own, and this year's event has proven to be no exception. In fact, it could be considered to be one of the most exciting events to date, with JungHoon Lee exploiting three major browsers, and securing a record $110,000 payout for one of the flaws. Starting the day off, JungHoon (aka: lokihardt) breached a time-of-check to time-of-use vulnerability in the 64-bit version of Internet Explorer, breaking out of the sandbox via a privileged JavaScript injection, allowing him to execute medium-integrity code. This flaw netted JungHoon $65,000.... Read more...
Google has long offered some serious protection in its Chrome Web browser from malicious software, and in some cases, I'd almost call it too protective. Nonetheless, the warnings the browser provides are good, because as unfortunate as it is, a lot of people end up downloading and installing something that's bundling more than they're bargaining for. Well, with Google's latest update to its 'SafeBroswing' mechanism, the level of protection is being taken step further. Now, if a site is known to be hosting malicious software, a warning will come up before the person is able to enter the website.... Read more...
When we reported on the release of Microsoft's latest preview build last week, we mentioned that while Cortana made an entrance, the much-anticipated Spartan browser did not. But little did we realize that some of Spartan made the cut, in the form of an experimental rendering engine hidden under IE's hood. As we learned in late December, Microsoft has separated its Trident engine into two separate versions: one is for Spartan, now called EdgeHTML, while the other remains with Internet Explorer. The reason Microsoft doesn't simply forego the lesser version is due to compatibility, which... Read more...
Google has a slick remote access tool that Android users have been using to connect to their PCs since April. Now that Chrome Remote Desktop is available on iTunes, iOS users are free to see what all the fuss is about. The Chrome Remote Desktop app for iOS puts your PC Desktop on the small screen. Chrome Remote Desktop for iOS lets you control your computers from an iPhone or iPad. (Of course, CRD also lets you control one PC from another computer or Android phone, too.) The touch nature of the app means that some actions are a little tricky (typing, for example), but by and large, it makes for... Read more...
The Internet is a wonderful place overflowing with information and different kinds of content. It also has its seedier sides; places where you wouldn't want your children stumbling into. Parental controls can only do so much, and while the burden ultimately falls on mom and pop to protect their kids from the web's back alleys, Google is taking it upon itself to give them a hand. Beginning next year, the search giant will roll out kid-specific versions of its services for the 12-year-old and under crowd. There's no specific timetable for this just yet, though Google's execs say this is a full-time... Read more...
For fans of J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle-Earth, Google released “A Journey through Middle-Earth.” It is an interactive map of the Middle-Earth where everyone can explore all 27 locations that were shown in the Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit film trilogies. But now the map has been updated to include a peer-to-peer battle game. “Completely new for this year’s version is a peer-to-peer battle game where you can challenge your friends to a test of skill,” says Google Chrome product manager Ellison-Taylor. “The peer-to-peer gameplay experience was built primarily using the latest web technologies, including... Read more...
Google has a history of trying things that may or may not have long-term success in the market, and creating Chrome OS for the Chromebook was certainly one of those things. Somewhat amazingly, the Chromebook has managed to gain enough traction to hang around for future iterations, as seen with Samsung's newly revised Chromebooks 2 launched this week. The refreshed 11.6-inch model has an Intel Celeron 2 (N2840) processor within (2.58GHz), 2GB of system memory, a 16GB eMMC storag echip and a 1366x768 resolution display. The unit also offers up to nine hours of battery life, anti-reflective technology... Read more...
As HBO mulls the addition of a streaming-only option for its content, Verizon and Sony consider cloud-based pay-TV replacements, and Roku celebrates sales of 10 million devices, it's obvious that the future of television looks different than what we've dealt with in the past. Google's Chromecast is amongst the least expensive and most flexible options when it comes to selecting a portable streaming apparatus, and this week, it's getting even better. The Google team has added the WATCH Disney, WATCH Disney Junior and WATCH Disney XD apps to Chromecast, as well as Twitch for gamers and iHeartRadio... Read more...
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