Intel Core 2 Duo E7200, Eco-Friendly Performance - HotHardware

Intel Core 2 Duo E7200, Eco-Friendly Performance

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Specifications

  • 2.53 GHz Clock Speed, Dual-Core

  • "Wolfdale" Core Architecture

  • 45nm Manufacturing Technology

  • 128 kB L1 Cache (Data/Instruction)

  • 3 MB Shared L2 Cache (Full Speed)

  • 1066 MHz Front Side Bus Speed

  • Socket-775 Form Factor Design

  • 1.2V Default Core Voltage

  • Supports 32/64-bit Processing (EM64T)

  • Supports SSE / SSE2 / SSE3 / SSE4.1

  • Supports Intel Speedstep / C1E

  • Supports Execute Disable (xD) Bit


Core 2 Duo E7200 - Top


Core 2 Duo E7200 - Bottom

The Core 2 Duo E7200 is the slowest speed 45nm dual-core processor released to date at 2.53 GHz stock speed, the next closest offering being the Intel Core 2 E8200 model, which runs at a slightly higher clocked 2.66GHz with a full 6MB of cache. The E7200 processor runs at 5% slower clock speed and has half the cache at 3 MB, but also costs 30% less overall, and is currently selling for around $130, which would be considered high-end Celeron territory previously.

The Wolfdale architecture is based on Intel’s latest 45nm manufacturing process, which means the chip runs cool and doesn’t consume a lot of power, even under heavy loads. Intel rates the Core 2 Duo E7200 with a TDP of 65W, although we feel that even this is somewhat conservative, as the chip ran close to room temperature with very low noise cooling.

Each of the two processor cores have an individual 64k of L1 cache and they share a pool of 3 MB L2 cache. 3 MB is the smallest amount of cache offered in an Intel 45nm product to date, and this is essentially why many enthusiasts will stay away from this processor. At the same clock speed, we can expect a Wolfdale with a full 6MB of cache to perform 5-10% better under intensive applications (such as gaming). However, 3 MB of cache is still plenty big for many work loads, and as you’ll see in our following benchmarks, the chip still performs within pretty similar levels of the other Wolfdale chips (with larger caches) we’ve seen to date in most scenarios. The positive side of having less cache means that the chip is physically less complex, and in addition to the power and heat benefits that come along with that, it also means that the chips are extremely good overclockers, as we’ll look into later.

In addition to having a smaller amount of cache, the E7200 also runs down a notch on its frontside bus speed from the standard 1333 MHz on other current Core 2 Duo chips to a modest 1066 MHz front side bus speed. Don't be too concerned about this, as Core 2 Duo dual-core chips rarely have the opportunity to saturate the front side bus, and you can easily shoot it back up to 1333 MHz if you so choose (and frankly, we would recommend so). It’s still a very modern processor architecture, with support for 64-bit processing, SSE4, top-notch power management and Execute Disable support. However, we should note that the E7200 does not have support for hardware virtualization acceleration and does not support Intel’s TXT (Trusted Execution Technology), which ties in with their enterprise level security efforts. As this chip is targeted for consumer applications, this isn’t all that surprising.  Although it’s disappointing to see, as these chips will undoubtedly make their way into low-cost / low-power / low-heat dual-core servers as well.

In order to run the new Core 2 Duo E7200, you will need to ensure that your motherboard and BIOS revision support Intel’s 45nm processors, as a BIOS update is needed for most systems that are older than six months. Most platforms in the last year will have BIOS support for this chip but we'd advise double-checking with the manufacturer. The latest round of motherboards based on a new chipset architecture like Intel's P35, X38,and X48 or NVIDIA's nForce 7x0i series should support this chip out of the box.

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Davo thats an very impressive OC.I had posted in the forums earliar this summer my summer project a build using a E8400 Wolfdale which came in around $249.00 at newegg which last check I think was $209.00. Everythng I read said the Wolfdales the E8400 and the 8500 were great Ocers.But the E7200 is about 70 to 80 dollars less and the numbers on your post are incredible.Making the price to performance ratio a great buy.Course the Summer rig I posted was I guess my Dream Rig at the time and still a little out of my reach still but you know how that is you always want faster and better.Considering what Im running anythings faster and Im looking forward to my upgrade.I might have missed it but what MB were you using? Either way thats a great performer and a great review just makes me drool till my upgrade!!YesYes

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Even overclocked to 3.5ghz, it often loses to a stock E8400.  You can definitely see why it costs cheaper.  But, it's got quite the kick for price, especially considering the OC abilities.  Quite the powerful CPU for only $130.

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Thats true its more of a budget thing with me.Of course if money wasnt an issue then we all would have the fastest and then it would be like Nascar around here even the playing field and we all would be butting heads to see who would come out on top depernding on skill, knowlege of OCing and then some luck! Which that would be some real fun matter of fact a whole lot of fun.Course I,ve been out of it awhile so you guys would oast my a___, thats ok to still be fun seeing who would Flamebroil their Rig first.LOL

 

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Cheap but nogo on gaming Sad

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WHAT?!?!?! NO hardware virtualization support? It was looking really good until you said that lol. But anyways. It is a good mainstreem processor and I think a lot of retailers will start selling it in there systems. Its a good cheep performer.

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=O wow the wolfdales overclocking is a amazing e7200 @ 5ghz seems crazy.

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So that poeple can get accurate numbers in power consumption you guys need to test the cpu on its own in idle and under load ,not the hole system

how do we know what wattage numbers it does in idle mode if its mesured mixed in a system on the graphs?, comon guys!

 measure them on their own! 

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