GlobalFoundries Details Plans For 2011 And Beyond - HotHardware

GlobalFoundries Details Plans For 2011 And Beyond

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On September 1, GlobalFoundries played host to the first annual Global Technology Conference (GTC for short). While there were a fair number of partner presentations on display, the conference was primarily driven by GlobalFoundries executives and announcements. When we spoke to GlobalFoundries in March we remarked on the company's aggressive roadmap; we were curious to see if the company would still be on track six months later.



Based on comments made by company CEO Doug Grose, GlobalFoundries is on track to realize some $4 billion in revenue for the year 2010 and plans to double its size within two years (it's unclear if this refers to revenue, wafer starts, or customer base). The company's long-term plans for Charter semiconductor have been clarified—despite the age of certain Chartered factories, many of them are well-tuned and optimized for their existing production lines. GF intends to ramp different nodes and technologies at its three international locations, as detailed below:



Chartered is capable of up to 210,000 200mm wafer starts per month (split across five fabs) and 50,000 300mm / 65nm wafer starts per month. These process nodes might seem old to PC enthusiasts, but they still account for an enormous amount of revenue—in Q2 2010, the majority of TSMC's revenue (55 percent) came from its 150+ nm nodes (28 percent) and its 65nm/55nm node (27 percent). At present, Chartered's Fab 7 produces some 40nm tech; this capacity will be transferred to Dresden. Fab 7 will be dedicated to 65/55nm production on 300mm wafers, and will ramp up to the 50,000 WPM (wafers per month) we mentioned earlier.

At Dresden, the fabs GlobalFoundries inherited from AMD are both slated for overhauls and expansions of their own. GlobalFoundries intends to boost the total output of the two fabs up to 80,000 WPM, up from an original 50K. Both facilities will be dedicated to sub-45nm production with a near-term focus on scaling both 32nm SOI and 28nm bulk silicon. Company executives dropped hints that there's some very early work on 22/20nm technology also being done at Dresden, but the bulk of that production will likely be handled at Fab 8 in New York.

Speaking of Fab 8, the foundry's product target has nearly doubled from 35,000 to 60,000 WPM. This additional capacity carries a cost; Fab 8 was originally expected to ship wafers for revenue in 2011 with full production in 2012. Now those dates have been pushed back a year, shipments will begin in 2012, with full production in 2013. Fab 8 will still launch using a 28nm process and 300nm wafers, but we expect Fab 8 to lead the company in 20/22nm production as those processes come online.


The company's general roadmap through 2010.

GlobalFoundries' long term goal is to provide potential customers with an array of processing nodes and technologies while simultaneously offering cross-foundry standardization. The Common Platform Alliance isn't new, but it was a major topic of conversation at GTC 2010. On the manufacturing side of things, the CPA is a joint agreement between Samsung, IBM, and GlobalFoundries. The three companies have agreed to deploy compatible bulk CMOS technology at their various facilities and to collaborate on semiconductor research.

According to GF, foundry customers benefit from this relationship in several ways. First, it offers synchronized production at multiple locations, thus smoothing out the capacity restrictions that might occur at any single fab. Second, it allows vendors to build a single design in multiple locations. This isn't the norm—if Company X wants to change from UMC to TSMC, its microcontroller will likely need to be re-optimized. This is true even if the process technology and wafer size are held constant. In the wake of TSMC's 40nm woes, customers are evidently interested in exploring more flexible manufacturing options, not to mention contract terms that don't leave them at the mercy of a single foundry.

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Very good article 1st off. Global Foundries will be a nice addition to the chip manufacturing industry. Again the problems that TSMC had as far as delays on the 40nm ATI chips for the 4 and 5 series shows we need a new player in this arena.

 

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lonewolf:
Very good article

I agree. Sounds like they've got it together at Global Foundries. They may make their mark in this industry yet, but don't expect Intel to just sit around waiting for it to happen either. They most likely have something up their sleeves, or somewhere hidden, just waiting to spring it on an unsuspecting world.

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Yea you can bet Intel is not sitting on their hands, I am sure they are brewing up something in Santa Clara. 

Again though until they get a decent GPU company or Larabee really comes through they are losing ground.

 

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Lonewolf:

Larrabee is dead. Dead dead. Intel has no plans to enter the graphics market at this time with a Larrabee product. In any event, Larrabee would never be a competitor with Bobcat or Bulldozer.

Intel already offers CULV products based on Arrandale (32nm, Core i3, dual-core). If Bobcat looks to be gaining ground on Atom, it's likely that Intel will respond in one or both of two ways: First, it could nudge Atom's speed upwards to 2-2.5GHz. That's 33-66 percent faster than current dual-core Atom's and it would certainly improve performance.

Second, Intel could revise its existing CULV line in order to hit price/performance targets that keep it competitive vs. Bobcat. We don't know which approach the company will choose, but one of these two make the most sense. They also don't require Intel to be sitting on an OMGSECRETWEAPON. Intel will absolutely fight back if Bobcat gains traction, but given AMD's current tiny share of the mobile market there's almost nowhere for the company to go but up.

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@ Joel H that is precisely my point Intel IMO is in trouble. I have been saying they "must" buy out Nvidia.

With the merger of CPU/GPU, AMD is in the drivers seat going forward.

As you correctly stated Larabee is dead and I agree so what options does Intel have to fight Bulldozer I don't know.

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lonewolf:
I have been saying they "must" buy out Nvidia. With the merger of CPU/GPU, AMD is in the drivers seat going forward.

I disagree. The acquisition of ATI didn't provide any Silver Bullet for AMD to nail Intel with. Not being a part of the High-End GPU market doesn't mean that Intel's floundering.  Look at the low end segment for a moment,...how many Intel based on-board video graphics solutions are in use right now? Don't they OWN that segment?

Don't they have a crapload of money laying around just waiting to snap up new technology companies?

Intel has better/smaller 32nm fab processes already in place and producing product as we speak. AMD doesn't yet,......

Intel says that they're on track to further shrink their process again in very little time. I believe them. It will be significant too.

Don't get me wrong,...I want to see AMD succeed. I like to see more than one CPU manufacturer. AMD being here is (what I think) keeping prices out of the Stratosphere. Their CPU's may not be the fastest, but they are usually the best bang for the buck for us low budget gamers and they work well too.

Now,....I'm not counting on winning this contest and getting the Mainboard and Video cards, but if 'it happens', (yeah right!) then I'll build an Intel box right after Christmas. But I expect that it's gonna be a Phenom Hex-Core Black with the same video cards in it because that's what I can afford to do.


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Lonewolf,

I agree with RealNeil. Frankly, the latest GPU inside Arrandale provides the hardware decode features that previously weren't included on most Intel G45 chipsets. True, if you're a gamer, Intel GPUs are still substandard, but for everyone else they'll suit--the days of a crawling Vista/Win7 GUI and no HD offload are gone for everything but Atom.

AMD continues to make noise about using the GPU for processing, but noise, thus far, is all it is. The company claims it'll eventually develop a more tightly-integrated version of the CPU/GPU than what we'll see with Llano/Bobcat, but thus far the only company that's heavily invested in GPU offload is the one company without a processor to marry it to. :P

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