ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q G-SYNC Monitor Review - HotHardware

ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q G-SYNC Monitor Review

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Before we dive in and show you the brand-new ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q G-Sync enabled monitor, we have a confession to make: We are ecstatic that there is finally some innovation happening in the monitor market. For years, 30” panels with native resolutions of 2560x1600 and paltry 60Hz refresh rates remained the pinnacle of desktop displays, while the rest of the market filled up with cheap, less-than-stellar 1080p panels. As much as we all loved our 30” panels around here, it got a little boring staring at the same screen for years on end, especially when all of the hardware around it was evolving at a breakneck pace.

Thankfully, this past year has seen the arrival of 4K displays, with much higher resolutions and pixel densities, and NVIDIA G-Sync enabled displays that offer high refresh rates that are well beyond mainstream displays. The ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q is one of the latter, but along with G-Sync support it also packs in some other desirable features that may make this the ultimate monitor for hardcore gamers. At least for now.

Take a look at the specifications below and then we’ll dive in a little deeper and explain why the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q is so darn good...

 

ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q G-SYNC Monitor
Specifications & Features

Display

Panel Size (diagonal)

27" (68.5 cm) Wide Screen (16:9)

Display Viewing Area (HxV)

596.74 x 335.66mm

Panel Backlight / Type

WLED / TN

Display Surface

non-glare

Color Saturation

72% NTSC

True Resolution

2D mode : 2560 x 1440 (up to 144Hz)
3D mode : 2560 x 1440 (120Hz or 100Hz)

Pixel Pitch

0.233 mm (109ppi)

Brightness

350 cd/m² (max.), 300 cd/m² (typical)

Contrast Ratio (Max.)

1000:1

Viewing Angle

170°(H) /160°(V)

Display Colors

16.7M

Response Time

1ms (Gray to Gray)

Video Features

NVIDIA G-SYNC Technology

Yes

Trace Free Technology

Yes

Color Temperature Selection

4 modes

HDCP

Yes

3D Technology

NVIDIA 3D Vision 2

GamePlus

Yes ( Crosshair / Timer)

Ultra Low Motion Blur (ULMB)

Yes

Input / Output

Connectors

DisplayPort 1.2, USB3.0 ports (Upstream x 1, Downstream x 2)

Power

Power Consumption

<90W (E.S 6.0) / <0.5W (Power Saving / Off)

Voltage

100–240V, 50 / 60 Hz

Mechanical Design

Chassis Colors

Matt black

Tilt (angle)

+20° ~ -5°

Swivel (angle)

+60° ~ -60°

Pivot (angle/direction)

90°(clockwise)

Height Adjustment (mm)

0~120 mm

VESA Wall Mounting (mm)

100 x 100 mm

Dimension / Weight

Phys. Dimension (WxHxD)

619.7 x 362.96 x 65.98 mm

Weight

7.0Kg(Net), 10.5Kg (Gross)

Find the ROG Swift PG278Q and other ASUS LCD Monitors @ Amazon.com


There’s a lot to digest in the table above, but we’ll call out some of the more noteworthy items. First is the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q’s size and resolution. This monitor is packing a 27” panel with a native resolutions of 2560x1440, which equates to a pixel density of about 109ppi. We’re not dealing with the same kind of ultra-high pixel densities as some recently-released 4K panels, but 1.8 megapixels on a 27” panel is nothing to sneeze at. In fact, with all of the growing pains associated with pixel scaling in Windows, some could argue that lower resolutions are still the way to go.

The ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q also offers a super-fast 1ms GtG response time, and a refresh rate as high at 144Hz. The panel is LED backlit and is of the TN variety. On some levels, TN panels are not quite as good as IPS or IGZO panels, since they don’t always offer quite the same viewing angles and/or color accuracy, but we have to say the particular panel used in the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q is probably the best TN panel we’ve laid eyes on.

Brightness on the ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q is rated for up to 350 cd/m², it has a 1000:1 contrast ratio, and it can display up to 72% of the NTSC color gamut. Other features include support for G-Sync, a ULMB (ultra low motion blur) mode, HDCP, color temperature selection, and everything else you’d expect for a high-end display, save for inputs. The ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q packs only a single DisplayPort input, which is necessary to support G-Sync.
 

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From what I've seen this is the only G-Sync monitor out right now, but there are many more to come. After using G-Sync it's supposed to be hard to go back to V-Sync. It's awesome to see G-Sync as well as AMD's FreeSync coming out for an even better PC gaming experience than what is available today. Obviously the price is a little steep at the moment, but similar to 4k I'm sure the price will drop eventually.

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I'm guessing that the only input is a displayport because not other inputs support that high a refresh rate @ that resolution yet. For example for anything over 60hz @ 4K resolution you need HDMI 2.0, HDMI 1.4 supports up to 60hz @ 4K resolution I think.

Definitely a step in the right direction.

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good review. this monitor has been garnering critical acclaim all over the place. I want one so bad but I recently dropped 400 on an IPS monitor with the same resolution. As much as it pains me, I will wait for the 4K IPS version. Hopefully such a thing is in the pipeline!

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I'm not a huge fan of 4k monitors for gaming. Speed and performance are very important to me, rather than having more pixels. Way to expensive to keep a steady framerate just for the extra pixels. I can see myself upgrading to a 1440p monitor though, as it only has a drop of about 20-30 fps in games. However, I am a huge fan of 4k TVs I've been waiting for a solid price drop for a long time. 

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I want one of these, but I can't get one of them until I win it here on HotHardware,................

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*Hint* *Hint*

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Yup

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In fact, along many of the growing disquiets associated among pixel scaling in Apertures, part could moot that debase resolves are peaceful the approach to go. Refurbished Cisco Hardware

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That is a beautiful monitor. That's going on my wishlist.

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