Clearwire Announces WiMAX Expansion Markets, New 4G Mini 10 Netbook

This year's CTIA show in Las Vegas is all about what's next: 4G. What's interesting is that most carriers don't even have 3G figured out; AT&T's 3G network still isn't robust enough to handle bursts of traffic in major cities, and yet the mobile world seems set on moving on to WiMAX, LTE, neither, or both. Clearwire is the major provider of WiMAX in the U.S. today, and there's no surprise to see the company making a number of major announcements at America's largest wireless show.

Throughout 2010, Clearwire plans on expanding their footprint in a big way. New markets that will see 4G service include Los Angeles, Miami, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Salt Lake City, and those markets are on top of ones already announced for 2010: New York City, Houston, Boston, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Denver, Minneapolis and the San Francisco Bay Area.



Another debut that really caught our eye was an all new Inspiron Mini 10 from Dell. This very netbook has seen quite a few iterations, and nearly every carrier has a model available with built-in WWAN. The only major carrier left out? Clearwire, but that changes today. Now, a 4G-equipped Mini 10 is slated to ship on April 1, 2010, and while the machine will look exactly like every other Mini 10, it will be able to surf on 4G airwaves if you're in a 4G location. The machine will cost $249.99 after an instant rebate, and it will be sold through both Clear and Dell channels.


ADDITIONAL 4G MARKETS

Clearwire currently provides 4G service in 27 markets across the United States. The company expects to cover up to 120 million people by the end of 2010. The CLEAR customer experience is similar to that provided by Wi-Fi, but without the short-range limitations of a traditional Internet hotspot. CLEAR uses a wireless 4G technology that differs from Wi-Fi called WiMAX, which provides service areas measured in miles, not feet. Today, CLEAR delivers speeds comparable to DSL connections, with average mobile download speeds of 3 to 6 mbps and bursts over 10 mbps.*

The company previously indicated that some of its new 4G markets scheduled to launch in 2010 include: New York City, Houston, Boston, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Denver, Minneapolis, and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Today, the company disclosed the names of some additional cities where Clearwire plans to launch 4G service in 2010, including: Los Angeles, Miami, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and Salt Lake City. Additional cities will be announced later this year. As previously announced, Clearwire will launch service in Houston in the coming weeks and the majority of the new 4G markets will launch toward the end of the year.

ADDITIONAL 4G DEVICES

On April 1, the Dell Inspiron Mini 10 netbook featuring the Intel® Atom™ processor N450 with embedded 4G technology will be available for customers through select CLEAR retail locations, telesales and www.clear.com. This addition will further extend the company’s leadership in 4G mobile computing. Today, Clearwire customers can select from one of 30 different 4G-ready Intel® Centrino® Advanced-N + WiMAX 6250 embedded netbooks and notebooks from leading manufacturers including Dell, Lenovo, Fujitsu, Samsung, and Toshiba. The Mini 10 will be available for $249.99 after instant rebate.

In addition, consumers unsatisfied with the speeds and limitations of 3G networks, or the need to seek out Wi-Fi hotspots, can use the upcoming Apple iPad on Clearwire’s open 4G network. With the portable and battery-powered CLEAR Spot, any off-the-shelf Wi-Fi device (compatible with 802.11b/g) – including the Apple iPad – can experience 4G wireless speeds at home or on the go. When coupled with a CLEAR USB modem, the CLEAR Spot ($139.99) creates a personal Wi-Fi hotspot for up to eight users that travels with consumers anywhere they happen to be within Clearwire’s 4G service areas. Later this year, Clearwire expects to introduce a next generation CLEAR Spot with integrated 4G technology.

Via:  Business Wire
Comments
animatortom 4 years ago

I switched to Clearwire about a month ago and I am now very happy. Like most other ISP's, the USB connector is very useful.

Although it does kinda play havoc with AVG, sine it looks at it as a secure wireless network instead of a Permanently connected land line.

I would still recommend it to anyone since unlike sprint and all the others there is no two year commitment. About the only drawback is it limits downloads to around 30GBs per month. So if you DL more than 1GB a day it can be kinda tough> I have not tried to go over that limit yet, I am sure the over charges would be outrageous.

Of corse now, they too, have to enter the netbook market?

la_guy_10 4 years ago

Makes perfect sense to me, the current 3G network is being taxed as there is not enough bandwidth to support all the data traffic. This is what slows down your mobile internet experience more than anything. Again I see no slowdown in the number of smartphones and other wireless internet devices entering the market over the next few years so the sooner they move to 4G the better. With that said, 5G could soon be a reality by 2012 at the current rate of growth.

infinityzen 4 years ago

Sprint will most likely be getting set to roll out 5G in late 2012. AT&T on the other hand will begin rolling out 4G in late 2011/early 2012 Sprinter, big red V, and t-mob will all have their 4G networks up and running (most likely 90+%) before AT&T even starts. Sad, so sad.

MPerez 4 years ago

I connected on August 18th on the top floor of the parking garage at 1001 McKinney using my iPhone.

I'm not sure where the signal was really coming from but it was spotty at best, going from fair to very good.

http://wimaxinhouston.blogspot.com

bob_on_the_cob 4 years ago

I have a clearwire box. It is kinda nice. Take it anywhere plug it in and you have internet. Would be more convenient if it was in a laptop like a 3G card. Better than 3G because they all cost like $50 a month and have a 5GB limit. Clearwire is $25 with no limit. The speed is on par with DSL, but the latency makes it not good for gaming. 

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