Items tagged with Study

Results from a study just released by global consulting company, Accenture, find that only about five percent of all consumer electronics product returns are due to actual failures or defects. The rest of the returns can be categorized as "no trouble found" (68 percent) or "buyer's remorse" (27 percent). The study also finds that "the average return rate for [consumer electronics] devices ranges from 11 to 20 percent." This amounts to approximately $13.8 billion being spent by "US consumer electronics manufacturers, communication carriers and electronics retailers" for "assessing, repairing, reboxing, restocking and reselling returned merchandise." This adds up to as much as six percent of manufacturers'... Read more...
As hard as it may be to believe, according to a study by research firm Parks Associates, nearly 20% of the population of the United States is disconnected from the Internet and has never used email. In their annual phone survey of U.S. households, Parks Associates found 20 million households are without Internet access, approximately 18% of the U.S."Nearly one out of three household heads has never used a computer to create a document. These data underscore the significant digital divide between the connected majority and the homes in the unconnected minority that rarely, if ever, use a computer.""Internet connections have slowly increased in U.S. households, but getting the disconnected minority... Read more...
California's hands-free mobile phone law goes into effect on July 1st. Starting on that date, California drivers will no longer be able to use hand-held phones, but will instead either need to use a hands-free device, whether it's a headset or integrated into the car.A study released Monday by the non-partisan Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) estimates that California will have 300 fewer traffic fatalities a year once the law goes into effect. According to Jed Kolko, PPIC research fellow and study author, if such a ban were extended across the U.S., thousands of lives could be saved.In a study released Monday, Jed Kolko, a fellow at the nonpartisan Public Policy Institute of California,... Read more...
You may recall that Chris Avenir, a first-year chemical engineering student at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, faced expulsion after it came to light that he had created a Facebook-based chemistry study group.  The horror, the horror!Chris Avenir's apparent exhortation to fellow Ryerson University engineering students to "input solutions" to assignment problems on the social networking site raised the ire of a professor.On Tuesday, the 18-year-old was told that while he wouldn't be expelled he would receive a zero on the assignment section of the chemistry course, which was worth 10 percent of his final grade.Despite that, Avenir still passed the course.He still passed the course... Read more...
The Motion Picture Association of America has always claimed great financial, er, ruin based on illegal downloads, and even blamed as much as 44% of its losses on college students.  Now it turns out that number was just a wee overinflated.In a 2005 study it commissioned, the Motion Picture Association of America claimed that 44 percent of the industry's domestic losses came from illegal downloading of movies by college students, who often have access to high-bandwidth networks on campus.The MPAA has used the study to pressure colleges to take tougher steps to prevent illegal file-sharing and to back legislation currently before the House of Representatives that would force them to do so.But... Read more...
This week the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) released a report which investigated DRM used in 16 different products and services. The conclusion was that many DRM technologies fail to comply with basic requirements of Canadian privacy law.The study, published by the University of Ottawa’s Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), indicated that DRM is being used to collect, use and disclose consumers’ personal information for secondary purposes, without giving the user adequate notice or the opportunity to opt-out of collection. The report investigated DRM systems used in 16 different digital products and services including Apple’s... Read more...
Some assert that the iPhone is not a smartphone, and iSuppli actually agrees with them, categorizing it as a "crossover phone" - one with both smartphone and feature phone attributes.  No matter what category it's in, it's a hot seller.  In a report issued today, iSuppli said the iPhone outpaced all other smartphones in July, its first full month of sales, and matched the sales of the best-selling feature phone. During its first full month of sales, Apple's highly anticipated smart phone grabbed 1.8 percent of the U.S. consumer mobile-handset market, according to iSuppli. The research firm's survey of more than 2 million U.S. consumers indicated sales of 220,000 iPhones in July. In its... Read more...
Something called the Online Publisher Organization Internet Activity Index is out, and it has some very interesting information in it; just not what they think it is. It measures the proportion of online time spent doing purely communications functions, as compared to viewing online content. According to the study, in the last four years it's shifted massively from the "talking to one another" side to the "looking at stuff" side. Anybody that's seen YouTube could have told you that.  The time consumers spent viewing online content, including video-sharing sites, news sites, video, social nets, weather and blogs, as a proportion of their total time online grew over the past four years... Read more...
A new study shows the effects of gaming on reading and study time amongst students 10-19 years old.  Not surprisingly these students shaved a little time off their studying and reading time to get in a few extra minutes with their favorite games.  Surprisingly they didn't often sacrifice much time with their families. for gamesHow much time to reading/study time are they missing out on?  Well boy gamers in the survey are said to have spent 30% less time reading while the girls who played games (They DO exist!) spent 34% less time doing their homework. “Cummings and Elizabeth Vandewater at the University of Texas at Austin wanted to see how these games affect academic pursuits and social relationships.They... Read more...
A study conducted by Hope Cummings of the University of Michigan and Elizabeth Vandewater of the University of Texas at Austin sampled a group of adolescents, both gamers and non-gamers, from around the U.S. to find out where they find the time to play games and what parts of their lives suffer as a result. They found that boys spent an average of 58 minutes playing games on weekdays and one hour and 37 minutes playing on weekend days. They also found that girls spent 44 minutes playing on a weekday and an hour and four minutes playing on weekend days. To make time for all this gaming, the study found that male gamers spent less time reading while female gamers spent less time doing... Read more...
Study Commissioned by AMD Reveals Scope of Annual U.S. Data Center Energy Consumption: 45 Billion kWh, at Cost of Nearly 3 Billion Dollars - AMD Calls for Increased Collaboration between Technology Industry and Government Officials to Track and Reduce Energy Consumption - NEW YORK - Feb. 15, 2007 - In a keynote address at the LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit in New York today, Randy Allen, corporate vice president, Server and Workstation Division, AMD (NYSE: AMD), revealed findings from a study that comprehensively calculated, for the first time, the energy consumed by national and global data centers annually. Addressing the need for thorough, credible estimates on data center power use, the... Read more...
DigiTimes is reporting on an independant study that lists the top 25 semiconductor suppliers in the world today.  Intel sits comfortably on top, with a 14% increase over last year's revenues.  AMD has certainly enjoyed some growth as well, moving from 11th place in 2004 up to 9th in 2005, a growth rate just shy of 12%.  It's also interesting to see who ranks in the top 25 overall.  Intel is expected to solidify its position as the world's leading semiconductor supplier this year, posting the highest revenue growth among the top 10 chipmakers for the year, according to a preliminary ranking from iSuppli. Much attention has been focused on the market share gains that Advanced... Read more...
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