Items tagged with nook

Last week, Amazon trimmed the price and improved the features of its flagship Kindle DX product and now it's apparently Sony's turn. As of today, the Reader Pocket Edition is $149 (down from $169), the Touch Edition is $169 (down from $199) and the Sony Daily Edition (the DX's primary competitor) is now $299, down from $349. That's quite a bit cheaper than even the Kindle DX's new pricetag of $379, and it tells us everything we need to know about Sony's position in the e-reader market:  It's losing. Look! It's the E-reader from that...from that other company! The price cuts on the Pocket Edition and the Touch Edition should keep them competitive against hardware from Barnes and Nobles' Nook... Read more...
It's hard to argue that more competition is better for consumers, and that's proving true once again in the growing e-reader market. For awhile, Amazon's Kindle dominated the entire space, and they pretty much ran the show. The Kindle (and subsequent revisions) were always priced rather fairly in the eyes of critics, but there's nothing like a surprise price drop to really get interest growing. In the hours following Barnes & Noble's announcement of the Wi-Fi only NOOK (and the price drop on the 3G + Wi-Fi NOOK to just $199), Amazon decided to cut the price of their Kindle (with global 3G wireless + Wi-Fi) in order to better compete. Before B&N's reveal, the Kindle was priced at $259.... Read more...
Who says Amazon will always rule the e-reader market? Barnes & Noble has been playing hardball ever since the company released the original NOOK, and now things have been stepped up a notch further. Today, the world's largest bookseller (who just so happens to sell their own e-reader) has introduced a new Wi-Fi only NOOK, and beyond that, also lowered the price on the existing Wi-Fi + 3G NOOK. Starting now, the existing NOOK (Wi-Fi + 3G) is available for just $199, which is a good bit less than what Amazon is currently charging for the Kindle. Also, the new Wi-Fi only NOOK, which is useful for those who generally only download new material when at home or in a coffee shop with free Wi-Fi... Read more...
Many could argue that the last thing the world needs is another e-book reader, but we aren't yet in that camp. Amazon's Kindle and the Barnes & Noble Nook could use the competition, and Acer is a solid name in the industry with what appears to be a solid idea of how they plan to change it up (with "it" being the e-reader market). The company has recently announced their 6" LumiRead, which is half-typical e-reader, and half-all new. The entire devices measures only a few millimeters thick, and it's outfitted with 2GB of memory for storing books and other materials. Of course, it uses a no-backlight e-ink display (rather than an LCD, like many of the cheaper e-readers that are emerging these... Read more...
The e-reader market is a questionable one right now. Some say that it's fine, and that true bookworms will continue to support E-Ink based devices. But some say that tablets and multi-use devices such as the iPad pose a great threat to e-readers, which are generally limited in what all they can do. One thing that is very clear, though, is that the Barnes & Noble Nook is just about the only e-reader in America to seriously rival the Kindle, and while other options are out there, few are as well thought-out, well-connected and well-designed as the two of these. Amazon has been letting blossoming authors self-publish titles onto the Kindle e-Bookstore for months, and while B&N is a bit behind... Read more...
The NOOK gets a serious update, the Kindle gets a serious partner in sales. Just another rosy day in the crowded e-book reader market. Up until now, Amazon's record-breaking Kindle has been sold in just one primary place: online. A virtual store with no real shelves, no real boxes and nothing for consumers to touch, see and experience. Amazon has had to rely on videos, text-based reviews and word-of-mouth in order to market their Kindle, and somehow, they've done an astounding job. Being "first to market" with a legitimate, 3G-enabled e-reader was a huge help, but still, it's sort of amazing to think about how many Kindles have been sold when it's impossible to just waltz into a Walmart and touch... Read more...
Anyone who ever told you that a single company owning the market was a good thing had their head in the clouds. In the latest edition of "why competition works," the Barnes & Noble NOOK e-reader is seeing one of the most impressive updates in a long time, and we have to believe that this update wouldn't be nearly as robust without Amazon's Kindle, Spring Design's Alex and Apple's iPad sitting beside it on the virtual shelves. These days, consumers have lots of choices when it comes to buying an e-book reader and/or tablet, so without a nice feature set, it's easy to overlook one and head right for another. It's clear that B&N doesn't want their recently launched NOOK to become the one... Read more...
Barnes & Noble plans to sell its Nook eBook reader at Best Buy starting April 18th. The specialty bookstore chain is expanding the distribution of the $259.99 Nook as it faces growing competition from Apple's iPad. The deal between Best Buy and Barnes & Noble will put the Nook in 1,070 Best Buy stores and will also place Barnes & Noble's BN eReader software on some of the personal computers and smartphones the electronics retailer sells. The deal with Best Buy will not only increase the Nook's availability (previously it was only available through Barnes & Noble's website and in 723 of its bookstores), but it will also improve the eBook reader's ability to compete with the recently... Read more...
We're just around two weeks out from seeing a deluge of iPad news (given that it ships on April 3rd), and already companies are racing one another to get iPad-specific apps out on the App Store. A New York Ties report on the sprint has a few notable entries, and if companies really do put in the time and effort needed to create iPad apps that are more than just pixel-doubled versions of the same apps already on the iPhone, the product might just have a chance at being more "than just a big iPod touch."Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble have both announced that they'll be working on apps for buying and reading e-books, which is certainly interesting considering that Apple will also be installed... Read more...
Barnes & Noble plans to offer a version of its eReader software designed for the iPad. The eReader will enable users to access more than one million eBooks, magazines, and newspapers in the Barnes & Noble eBookstore as well as content in a user's own Barnes & Noble digital library. Even though the iPad will compete against Barnes & Noble's own device, the Nook, the bookseller is sticking with its commitment to provide the eReader software for as many screens as possible. Barnes & Noble's free eReader software is currently available for most computing and mobile devices such as the PC, Mac, iPhone, iPod touch, and BlackBerry. With Apple entering the e-reader space, some book... Read more...
In recent months, Amazon has issued one press release after another to talk up the success of its Kindle ebook reader. The hype surrounding Kindle's success has helped to propel Amazon's share price upward, but some are wondering how long Amazon can continue to make headlines before it releases actual numbers to back up its claims. On December 26, Amazon claimed the Kindle was the most purchased gift in its history and that sales of electronic books from its store surpassed physical book sales on Christmas day. Half-way through December, the retailer said the Kindle had enjoyed its best monthly sales ever in that month. While both of these claims certainly sound impressive, Amazon never provided... Read more...
Intel on Tuesday introduced a new e-book reader, one designed for the visually impaired, which can read digital files of books aloud, as well as capture images from printed material via a 5-megapixel digital camera and similarly read the text aloud at a variety of listening speeds. Additionally, the Intel Reader, as its called, has a 4" display that will show the text in large fonts, for those impaired, and not blind. The $1,499 device may seem expensive when compared to the Kindle 2, which can also read aloud, though in a robotic voice, but this new device is designed specifically as a reader for the visually impaired, as opposed to a consumer device. In fact, you may recall that the Kindle... Read more...
Barnes & Noble's nook hasn't even seen the light of day yet (it's pre-order only), and it's already embroiled in a lawsuit. In this case, Spring Design, which has its own e-book reader, is claiming B&N has used IP garnered from meetings with Spring Design in its nook.The lawsuit addresses Spring Design's "Alex" e-book reader, which features two e-ink displays with capacitive touchscreens as well as the Google Android operating systems. This is all very similar to the nook.Spring Design claims in their press release that they and Barnes and Noble had been meeting since the beginning of this year, with B&N noting very favorable impressions of the device.  It seemed there was a... Read more...
LCDs may be neat, plasmas may be entertaining and projectors may be awe-inspiring, but e-ink is the future. With the e-book reader revolution fully upon us, there's little doubt that e-ink manufacturers will be pumping out mind-blowing new modifications to improve upon the greyscale versions that we're used to.Liquavista is aiming to be one of the first to break the mold, and if the video posted below is any indication, this company may have something special in store for future-generation readers from Sony, Plastic Logic and Amazon. The LiquavistaBright technology is faster, brighter and more responsive than existing e-ink technologies, enabling users to see their doodles quicker, turn pages... Read more...
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