Items tagged with Nielsen

Think back to when you were 6 years old waking up on Christmas morning. If you were lucky, your big ticket item was a BMX bike. Race car sets, Matchbox cars, and a new Michael Jackson album were all winning bets too. These days? Kids ages 6-12 want nothing more than to find an iPad sitting under the tree on December 25th. According to market research firm Nielsen, Apple's magical tablet topped the list of electronic devices kids in the above age category are pining for, with 31 percent hoping to score an iPad, lack of Flash support be damned. A computer and iPod touch tied for second place, each one claiming a 29 percent interest in a future purchase, followed by a Nintendo DS/DSi/DS Lite (25... Read more...
According to a recent wireless study by the Nielsen Co., the typical smartphone user consumes less than 300MB of data each month. This figure represents an increase of about 230 percent compared to last year's figure. Considering the increasing popularity of data-intensive mobile services such as video chat and Hulu streaming services, we have to expect that mobile data use will continue to rise. The Nielsen Co. sorted through about 60,000 mobile bills to discover that the average smartphone user was consuming about 298MB of data each month. As you may recall, AT&T recently unveiled new, tiered data plans. The lowest tier offers only 200MB of data for $15 per month. Although this allotment... Read more...
The long-discussed Comcast online television experiment will launch before year's end, allowing viewers to — legally — watch certain shows online for the first time. A couple dozen networks - including HBO, Showtime, TNT and AMC - have agreed to allow Comcast to provide access to their most popular television shows online to existing cable company subscribers. Time Warner is said to be next in line, if the Comcast experiment works out, and it's possible the move will extend beyond subscribers once the kinks are worked out. It's up to the individual networks to decide how much of their content is available online. For example, HBO could release all seasons of "True Blood," while AMC might decide... Read more...
Since announcing the inception of TV Everywhere last month, Comcast has managed to line up a whopping 23 networks to agree to provide their content online.It started simply, with an agreement between the cable company and Time Warner (owner of TNT and TBS and, interestingly enough, a cable company as well) to provide shows online, on demand. Original programming was to be accessible on Comcast.net and Fancast.net to customers of the cable company. The idea was to later stream the shows on TNT.tv and TBS.com.Now? There are 23 networks who've signed up: A&E, AMC, BBC America, CBS, Cinemax, DIY Network, Fine Living Network, Food Network, Hallmark Channel, HBO, HGTV, History, IFC, MGM Impact,... Read more...
Fans of The Closer, My Boys and Tyler Perry just got another way to watch their favorite shows: Online.Time Warner Inc. and Comcast Corp. yesterday announced a partnership to "develop broad principles for the TV Everywhere model to guide the distribution of its television content online."The basis of TV Everywhere are these principles:Bring more TV content, more easily to more people across platforms. Video subscribers can watch programming from their favorite TV networks online for no additional charge. Video subscribers can access this content using any broadband connection. Programmers should make their best and highest-rated programming available online. Both networks and video distributors... Read more...
The day so many had hoped to put off forever is almost here: June 12. That's the day when all broadcast channels must transition to digital broadcasting and millions of viewers across the nation will end up without TV service. The horror!While most people — anyone with cable or satellite television, for example — won't be affected, there are an awful lot of people out there who rely on the free broadcast signal that floats through the airwaves for their television service. It's estimated that fully 2.8 million people who get the basic broadcast channels now simply using rabbit ears or an old-fashioned antenna on their roof will lose that signal come Friday. That's 2.5 percent of Americans with... Read more...
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