Items tagged with KickStarter

When we first caught wind of the OUYA gaming console raising a startling amount of money on Kickstarter (which eventually reached almost $8.6 million) in July, we noted that the console and its small development team had a major mountain to scale to compete in the market. On June 4th, OUYA will accomplish its most impressive feat to date by landing on store shelves. Those who backed OUYA on Kickstarter will receive their consoles in March, but everyone else can already preorder an OUYA console at sites including Amazon, Target, and Best Buy. The console plus one controller will cost $99.99, and a second controller will run you another $49.99. All of the console’s games will be free. Note... Read more...
We're only a few weeks into the New Year and there's already an exciting gaming project in Kickstarter. It's Vendetta Online, an existing twich-based, sci-fi themed MMORPG that's available on a number of platforms. In fact, two years ago it was the first PC 3D MMO to make the leap to mobile and is now available for Android, in addition to Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows (including Windows 8/RT). Where's iOS support, you ask? That's what the Kickstarter campaign is for. The developers want to expand Vendetta Online over to the iPad (2nd Gen and newer). With your funds, Vendetta Online will be polished for the iPad with Retina Display support and voice over acting to early missions. "By funding this... Read more...
We've covered a number of high-profile Kickstarter projects on HotHardware in 2012, and there's good reason for that. The online crowd funding site had a busy year, one in which more than 18,000 projects were successfully funded. Over 2.2 million people contributed hard earned dollars to various projects, pledging a combined $319.78 million. "From groundbreaking projects to inspiring stories, 2012 was a year of many memorable moments on Kickstarter. To celebrate the year that was, our team put together this look back at some of our favorite projects and moments," Kickstarter stated on a special page that reveals some interesting data. If you break things down, backers pledged over $600 per minute... Read more...
Well, it was really only a matter of time. When you look back at gaming a decade ago, handheld gaming followed the same logic as console gaming -- you had closed platforms and only a smattering of players. If it didn't ship for Nintendo, Microsoft or Sony (or Sega, before that), it wasn't shipping. But look at gaming today. Perhaps the biggest threat to industry stalwarts like Nintendo isn't Sony or Microsoft, but players like Apple and Google -- companies that never even tried to enter the gaming space, but are now enjoying huge success there thanks to a vibrant app community and developers who have ported games to Android and iOS. Now, imagine a crossover world where those Android titles were... Read more...
Yesterday, we reported that a Kickstarter project called POP, a wireless charging station that could support all mobile devices, got effectively shut down after Apple refused to allow the developer to implement both a Lightning connector and a 30-pin iPod connector in the same device. The developer, Jamie Siminoff, lamented the turn of events in a blog post and pledged to refund his backers. However, Apple has sent word out that it has (had?) changed its policy to allow the connectors to be placed side-by-side. Thus, the POP charger can live on, which should be good news for Siminoff and all his backers. Here’s the text of Apple’s statement: Our technical specifications provide clear... Read more...
The developers behind a Kickstarter project called POP (short for “portable power”), a multi-device charging station that would support virtually all mobile devices, were looking to raise $50,000 but found themselves flush with over $139,000 in support. The portable chargers looked promising, but the devs hit a brick wall when Apple denied their application to integrate the new Lightning interface into the POP devices. (Apparently, you can’t just use Lightning without expressed written consent from Apple.) Just like that, Apple torpedoed the whole project, which underscores just how powerful the company is. With the POP project dead in the water, the developers had another problem,... Read more...
Crowd funding site Kickstarter has been host to some compelling endeavors, and the site offers a beautifully democratic way for people to back the kinds of products, technologies, and services they care about. The fundraising portion of these projects can be thrilling, as we saw with the open source gaming console Ouya, but of course once a project has enough cash raised, the originators still have to execute their plans. Thomas Edison would say that the post-idea, post-fundraising phase of a project is about 99% of the work. There have been some rumblings about what happens to backer money if a developer fails to deliver on a promised project, and Kickstarter has clarified its position on some... Read more...
What do you do when the world jumps into its hand basket? You build a fort and survive, of course. And while you’re waiting for the apocalypse, a good way to practice might be Forsaken Fortress, should it come to pass. Think of a post-apocalyptic version of The Sims and you’re in the right neighborhood. If you build it, they will come. Unfortunately, "they" are swarms of murderers and monsters. The survival RPG's publisher, Photon Productions, is raising money for the project on Kickstarter. The game is cross-platform: Linux, Mac, and PC. Pledges can get you the digital download for free, as well as in-game items and other goodies. The game, which is slated for Oct. 2013, lets you... Read more...
When the team behind the Ouya open source gaming console was soliciting startup funds on Kickstarter, we all took notice, and despite asking for just $950,000 in cash, the group found itself flush with nearly $8.6 million in cash. Apparently the prospect of a $109 gaming console that was built specifically to be hacked and tweaked by basement geniuses everywhere and could maybe someday contend with the industry heavy hitters was just too hard for grassroots donors to resist. Those donors who forked over enough cash to qualify are getting a slightly belated Christmas present: The Ouya team announced that it will be shipping its advance consoles this month. They’ll leave the factory on December... Read more...
Apple and PC doomsayers like to talk an awful lot about the so-called post-PC era, but you know what? Desktops are far from dead, "they've just been boring," claims the developers of the Xi3 Modular Computer project. They want to change the way computers are built, serviced, and upgraded, but first they need to raise a quarter of a million dollars. Where else to try and do that other than Kickstarter? "One of the biggest problems with desktop computers is that they have to be replaced every few years. They’re also expensive to operate, have roughly the same specs, look like each other, etc., etc., etc. In other words, they’re expensive, boring, and extremely unfriendly to the planet.... Read more...
Kickstarter, an increasingly popular crowd funding site that's helped developers and inventors raise millions of dollars for their projects, wants to clear the air. First and foremost, "Kickstarter is not a store," the site stated in a blog post. "It's hard to know how many people feel like they're shopping at a store when they're backing projects on Kickstarter, but we want to make sure that it's no one," Kickstarter said. "Today we're introducing a number of changes to reinforce that Kickstarter isn’t a store — it’s a new way for creators and audiences to work together to make things." One of the most popular Kickstater project has been Ouya, a $99 Android game console. Chief... Read more...
Sanjay Dastoor, co-founder of Boosted Boards, claims that 50 percent of all trips people take in cars are under 5 miles, and that's 20 percent of all commutes. Considering the average automobile weighs several thousands pounds, it seems like overkill for all those short trips, doesn't it? Hence the reason Dastoor and others created Boosted Boards, purportedly "the world's lightest electric vehicle." Calling it a "vehicle" is being a little liberal with the definition. Boosted Boards are actually elongated electric skateboards that weigh 12 pounds. Lithium batteries provide 2,000 watts of power -- enough to go up to 6 miles before needing a recharge -- and twin brushless motors push the plank... Read more...
Kickstarter is the largest crowd funding website in cyberspace, and it's managed to raise millions of dollars for promising projects. One of them is Ouya, the $99 Android game console that originally had a goal of soliciting $950,000 but ended up with nearly $8.6 million in pledges when the dust settled. It's not the only project to blow past its goal, but it does bring up an interesting question. If the project fails, will backers receive a refund? It's a question NPR presented to Ouya, which admittedly didn't know the answer. "Technically, from a Kickstarter perspective, I don't know the answer to that," Ouya CEO Julie Uhrman said. "But from a doing-the-right-thing perspective, we will treat... Read more...
If you’re at all interested in space exploration, you’ve probably already heard of LiftPort, the company behind the Space Elevator, which has been in the works for the better part of a decade. The plan is to build an elevator that travels along a high-tech ribbon between the Earth and a platform in space, and another that tethers a platform to the moon. Ships could then move from one to the other. Far-fetched as it might sound, the elevator has received plenty of attention from the burgeoning space industry – including NASA, which provided the initial research. Now, LiftPort is asking for your help achieving an important step in the overall project: Tethered Towers. According... Read more...
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