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It looks like the trend of making more energy efficient PCs has spread from common laptops, desktops and servers, all the way up to supercomputers.  The system is designed for defense and scientific research. "Called Maxwell, the computer has been built at the University of Edinburgh and uses field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) in place of conventional processors. Its Scottish developers believe Maxwell represents a new generation of compact and energy-efficient computers. Unlike ordinary general-purpose processors, FPGA chips can be programmed to perform very specific tasks. Once that programming is accomplished, FPGA chips can be much faster than performing the same tasks in software... Read more...
If you're still using an "older" computer with AGP and have been stressing out about DirectX 10 cards, worry no more mon ami! GeCube is planning to satisfy your lust for a new graphics card without the need of adding other costly components such as a new motherboard, CPU(s), and/or memory. "We asked about the continuing contraction of the AGP market, but were told that the demand for AGP is still very strong. In fact, AGP accounts for the lion's share of some markets. So for those users that want a AGP perfromance (sic) part this company will offer DirectX 10 boards based on RV610 and RV630. In fact, there will even be an overclocked version... Read more...
Here's some good news for laptop users and/or anyone willing to mount laptop drives in their desktops: SanDisk's 32GB 2.5" is not going to ship at $500 per drive as earlier reports suggested. How much would you pay? $600? $700? $1000!?! No way! SanDisk is saying the drives will only cost $350. Sure the drive is a little short in the capacity arena but so was the original Raptor. Putting a few of these bad boys in Raid 0 might be a lot safer than traditional drives because of their lack of moving parts, just don't salivate on the drives. "The 32GB, 2.5-inch SanDisk SSD is available now to computer manufacturers, with initial pricing... Read more...
Manu Kumar, a researcher at Stanford university, has come up with an alternative to using a mouse to identify and click on items on the computer screen. It uses an eye-tracking camera and a button on the keyboard. At the heart of Kumar's technology is software called EyePoint that works with standard eye-tracking hardware. The software uses an approach that requires that a person look at a Web link, for instance, and hold a "hot key" on the keyboard (usually found on the number pad on the right) as she is looking. The area of the screen that's being looked at becomes magnified. Then, the person pinpoints her focus within the magnified region... Read more...
Tired of seeing billboards in the car, watching advertisements on TV, or listening to radio spots between you're favorite songs? Well if you are, bad news friend. Ads are making their way into video games and companies such as IGA Worldwide are making placing advertisements in games a profitable business. While this isn't necessarily a new concept, it is taking a whole new direction which may prove to bring in game advertising to a whole new level. See what the guys at Bit-Tech have to say about the subject here. In-game advertising, or IGA, is getting to be a potent buzzword in our industry. It also elicits some strong connotations - things like corporate greed, spyware... Read more...
Sorry to bother you, but the Internet is busted. And we're not talking "global-warming-forty -years-from-now-we're-going-to-be-really-hot busted." We appear to be talking "this-year" busted. A new assessment from Deloitte & Touche predicts that global traffic will exceed the Internet's capacity as soon as this year. Why? The rapid growth in the number of global Internet users, combined with the rise of online video services and the lack of investment in new infrastructure. If Deloitte's predictions are accurate, the traffic on many Internet backbones could slow to a crawl this year absent substantial new infrastructure investments and deployment. Net Neutrality means... Read more...
There are some very bad people out there in the world. But it goes beyond bad to put malicious code onto Santa Claus' .net webpage. "Nestled all snug in the bottom of his home page was a nice little bit of code containing a badware link," he added. The problem was soon resolved, but alas, while good boys and girls may fall asleep waiting for a visit from St. Nicholas, there's no delay at all when you're dealing with the bad guys. On Friday, malware had again cropped up on the Web site. Stopbadware.org is helping Kris Kringle get the offending code off his site, but you really have to wonder... Read more...
How many different cellphones have you yelled into in your lifetime? I remember singing the praises of my bag phone with the battery life of a tse-tse fly. Since then? Dozens. And they were all useful for as long as they lasted and the next big thing came along. For all I know, they're still useful to someone, somewhere; they all worked perfectly when I got rid of them. No wonder there's a huge market for used cellphones, and it spans the globe: Based in small-town Michigan, ReCellular gets 75,000 used phones a week - most collected in charity fundraisers - and refurbishes more than half of them for sale around the world. The remainder... Read more...
Daniel Gross at Slate.com has an interesting look at the rush by big, established internet companies and others to buy social networking sites - for big money.  Me, I still can't get used to typing the words "Big, established internet companies" without thinking of Pets.com or Duke Nukem vaporware: The "social-networking" gold rush continues. Last year, MySpace was acquired by News Corp. for $580 million in cash. Now the other big social-networking sites are the subject of rumors, deals, and transactions. Yahoo! was interested in acquiring Facebook for $1 billion, but the company's youthful founders are holding out for more.... Read more...
The hunt for a safe and secure browser has long been the focus of computer users due to the rapid increase in cyber crime.  Due to its popularity, Internet Explorer long became the focus of attacks.  This gave rise to alternate browsers such as Opera and Firefox.  These alternate browsers rapidly increased in popularity and maintained a relatively positive record for deterring would be cyber criminals. Apparently, that has now changed.   Symantec is now reporting that there is truly no "safe" browser free from exploits and holes. While Internet Explorer remains the most frequently targeted... Read more...
In a response to rumors of scrapping the ATi brand name, AMD has set the record straight with Ars Technica. AMD has said it plans to keep the ATi name, as well as the Radeon brand name. "Yesterday CustomPC claimed that AMD was going to scrap the ATI brand, inferring this in a most dubious manner. AMD's Gareth Cater had told them that AMD would, in fact, retain its name after the buyout was finished, meaning that AMD would remain AMD for the foreseeable future. CustomPC then assumed that this would mean that ATI as a brand was going to be dropped, reported it as such. The echo-chamber did the rest. For our part, we contacted AMD public relations... Read more...
Those of you looking for work in the high-tech field may want to pack a bag and move where the money is.  This story from Forbes.com details the top 25 cities across the U.S. for high-paying tech jobs.  I was surprised to find my new home-town of Norwalk, CT was number 8. Why don't some of you HH fans move to the area so we can start an annual high-tech BBQ here in the BW Labs? "If you want to find the top-paying jobs in the U.S. tech industry, you may want to look in the obvious places -- Montgomery, Ala., Idaho Falls, Idaho, and Fort Smith, Ark., for instance. Surprised? So were we. But for those looking to make top dollar as... Read more...
The Inquirer is running a story this morning that gives us a very brief preview of ATI's upcoming R580-based mobile GPU. Likely dubbed the Mobility Radeon X1900, it seems safe to assume that this new flagship mobile part will best NVIDIA's current GeForce Go 7800 GTX GPU. Obviously, the frame rates of the available NVIDIA GPU will certainly be faster than the 0fps of the unavailable part. However, the most interesting question within this story is, "What happened to M58?". It was not hard to get this one as M58 was the codename for the still unannounced Mobility Radeon X1800. We have seen this chip more than once already but we don't know about any design wins.... Read more...
In October of '05 ATI officially unveiled a new family of graphics cards based on the company's R520 GPU core and its derivatives. With the R520 ATI introduced a new "Ultra-Threaded" architecture, along with their new Ring Bus memory controller, and a more powerful video engine dubbed AVIVO, among numerous other things. Unfortunately though, the R520 and its derivatives, which were the first members of what eventually became known as the X1K family of products, were a long time coming. The move to a 90nm manufacturing process in conjunction with a simple circuit bug that was replicated throughout the chip, resulted in ATI missing almost an entire product cycle. For about four months,... Read more...
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