Items tagged with Windows 7

The latest documents from Vault 7, a collection of confidential materials related to hacking tools used by the United States Central Intelligence Agency and obtained by WikiLeaks, was made public today by the whistle blowing organization. This newest leak details the CIA's Angelfire project, which is a persistent framework that can load and execute custom malware on computers running Windows XP and Windows 7.Angelfire consists of five components, including Solartime, Wolfcreek, Keystone (previously MagicWand), BadMFS,a nd the Windows Transitory File system. Each of these parts has a distinct job.... Read more...
It hasn’t exactly been a sterling month with regards to security for Microsoft. The company was rocked by WannaCry, a ransomware outbreak that spread across the globe. Now we’re learning of a new vulnerability that revolves around a hidden Windows metadata file called $MFT. $MFT is used by the NTFS filesystem, and resides in the root directory of Windows operating systems.  Accessing it is a big no-no as far as Windows is concerned, and will result in the operating putting a permanent lock on the file. This locking behavior is exactly what happens in the case of the exploit initially discovered... Read more...
For a quick minute, it looked as though a strain of ransomware that was seemingly stolen from the United States National Security Agency (NSA) was going to be a major problem for PCs around the world, and in particular Windows XP systems. Microsoft even made the unusual move of releasing an emergency patch for Windows XP even though it stopped supporting the legacy OS a long time ago. But now a week after the initial WannaCry outbreak it's been discovered that Windows 7 PCs were the hardest hit. A researcher for Kaspersky Lab posted a message on Twitter saying "the Windows XP count is insignificant,"... Read more...
Many long time Windows users have not been pleased with Microsoft’s decision to block updates to Windows 7 and 8.1 for systems running current and future generations of processors. Intel’s Kaby Lake and AMD’s Ryzen chips are among the first blacklisted casualties of this policy.Microsoft deemed this necessary to improve the deployment cycle of Windows and ease the workload on hardware partners validating their products across multiple generations of Windows. Whether you buy that reasoning or not isn’t for us to decide. The fact of the matter is, Microsoft wants every one of its customers locked... Read more...
Microsoft made headlines early last year when it announced that users of Intel Skylake (and newer) processors, would need to run Windows 10, as support would be dropped on older versions of Windows. After that initial announcement, there wasn't much additional news related to the story. That is until last fall, when Redmond's most notable company told us that it was backtracking on the idea. That was a relief to many users, but unfortunately, it was only a temporary one. It didn't take long for another issue to arise, when it was revealed that those restrictions would go into effect with Intel's... Read more...
It might be only a matter of time before every version of Windows prior to Windows 10 barely registers a blip on the radar, but in the here and now, that is not the case. Windows 7 is still widely deployed. What's more interesting is that even though Windows 10 has been steadily growing its share of the OS market since it came out in July 2015, it has given up a bit of ground to Windows 7 over the past few months.By way of Windows users who have opted to send Microsoft telemetry data, Microsoft's own audit of Windows installs shows that Windows 10 dropped from 48 percent in December of last year... Read more...
Late last week, news came across the wire that Khronos Group’s Vulkan API would not be supporting multi-GPU configurations on legacy operating systems like Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. This determination was made based on a slide that came from a Khronos Group presentation from GDC 2017. In the slide deck, it was stated that native multi-GPU support for AMD CrossFire and NVIDIA SLI was reliant on the Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM) being set to Linked Display Adapter (LDA) mode. It was assumed that the LDA mode was exclusive to WDDM 2.0, thus making multi-GPU support available only to gamers... Read more...
Well, it looks as though any hope that PC users had of receiving official Ryzen driver support in Windows 7 have officially been flushed down the toilet. Earlier this week, we reported that comments made at an AMD Partner Meeting in Germany suggested that the chipmaker would provide its own official Windows 7 drivers for both the Ryzen processor family and AM4-based motherboards. However, AMD today confirmed that this is not the case, and that Ryzen will only be officially supported on Windows 10. “To achieve the highest confidence in the performance of our AMD Ryzen desktop processors, AMD... Read more...
Enthusiasts are eagerly awaiting the arrival of AMD’s new Ryzen processors, which are scheduled to hit store shelves early next month. While we won’t find out all of the juicy details surrounding Ryzen until closer to launch, one bit of good news leaked out over the weekend that should be music to the ears of enthusiasts and businesses that still have a kung fu grip on Windows 7. AMD recently revealed at an information session that it is working on drivers that will add official Ryzen (and AM4 platform) support to Microsoft’s still-popular Windows 7 operating system. Microsoft is not taking it... Read more...
When it comes to operating systems of the past two decades, Windows XP had a remarkably long run thanks to its robust app and hardware support (and ubiquity). Microsoft hoped to build on these strengths with its successor, Windows Vista, but ultimately failed. So, when Windows 7 came around, it was seen as a breath of fresh, taking many of the positives of Windows Vista and melding it into a powerful an feature-packed operating system. To many consumers and businesses, Windows 7 has been the “gold standard” for the past seven years and see little reason to upgrade. Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 didn’t... Read more...
Turn out the lights, the party's over. An end of an era has officially come to a close as Microsoft stops sales of Windows 7 Professional, the last version of Windows 7 that it continued providing to OEM system builders a full two years after ceasing sales of the Home Basic, Home Premium, and Ultimate SKUs. Same goes for Windows 8.1—Microsoft has stopped selling new licenses. As of October 31, 2016, both products reached their "end of sales" date for PCs that come with Windows preinstalled. What that means is that OEMs are not able to purchase additional Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 licenses... Read more...
If you don't give a flying flip about Windows 10 but need a new PC, time is running out to purchase a system that's still rocking Windows 7. Same goes for Windows 8.1, though if you're not a fan of Windows 10, you're probably not real keen on Windows 8.1 either. In any event, big name OEMs (Original Equipment Manufactures) will no longer be allowed to sell Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 machines once November rolls around.October 31, 2016 is what Microsoft refers to as the "End of sales" date for both legacy operating systems that come pre-installed on systems. So beginning November 1, the only version... Read more...
Microsoft is making a big change to the way it delivers updates for its legacy Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 operating systems. Instead of rolling out individual updates on a regular basis, the company will adopt the Windows 10 model and cram all updates into single, monthly “rollup”. Microsoft said that its past approach allowed customers to be “selective with the updates you deployed”, but it also lead to fragmentation among PCs, which in turn lead to numerous problems; especially for its enterprise customers. Microsoft cites an increase in “sync and dependency errors” and lower overall update quality... Read more...
Microsoft set off a nuclear blast in the PC enthusiast community this past January when it announced that it would cut off support for Intel Skylake-based machines running Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 on July 17th, 2017. This was ostensibly a move to force more users to upgrade to Windows 10, or else face the possibility of losing access to security updates. The folks in Redmond, Washington justified the move at the time, citing the “advanced” age of the operating systems. Microsoft did, however, give some of its top OEM partners a reprieve, exempting select machines from its banhammer. Needless... Read more...
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