Items tagged with Teardown

The iPhone 8 looks similar to the iPhone 7, which itself looks similar to the iPhone 6, and on down the line. In some respects, smartphone design finds itself in a state of stagnation. In an attempt to buck that trend, Apple launched an iPhone X model alongside its new iPhone 8 phones. It is a celebratory product in recognition of the iPhone's 10-year anniversary, and it a features a bit of a different design than the iPhone 8 and previous iterations. Putting it under the knife, however, reveals that not much is different in terms of do-it-yourself repairability. Apple's highly sought-after iPhone... Read more...
The iPhone 8 is out and that means it is time for a teardown. To ensure a timely dissection of Apple's latest generation smartphone, the technology surgeons at iFixIt hopped on a plane and headed to the Circuitwise headquarters in Sydney, Australia, where the local time is a full 14 hours ahead of the Eastern Time Zone, and 17 hours in front of the Pacific Time Zone. Talk about commitment! While the location of this latest smartphone operation may have changed, the process of tearing into an iPhone device has not, at least for the most part. It starts with the removal of pentalobe screws and then... Read more...
It seems like a million years ago when Samsung was known for using plastic in the construction of its Galaxy handsets, which had removable batteries to boot. But like most smartphone makers, Samsung went the premium route with tightly fused glass and metal. That is also the case with its recently introduced Galaxy Note 8, and as a teardown of the device reveals, liberal use of adhesive continues to rule the day.Unlike the phones of yesteryear, most of today's high-end handsets are designed to stay closed up and sealed tightly enough to keep the elements out. As a result, the Galaxy Note 8 is glued... Read more...
Andy Rubin’s Essential Phone has definitely gotten off to a rocky start. Following the flagship Android smartphone’s debut, Essential faced disappointing shipping delays, and more recently, a rather embarrassing violation of user privacy. Now, Essential Phone is being assaulted from another front thanks to a new teardown report from iFixit. Actually getting into the device proved more difficult than expected, as iFixit’s usual arsenal of sharp tools and heat guns were ineffective at [non-destructive] penetration into the Essential Phone’s frame. There are few visible seams (along with heavy-handed... Read more...
We have said it before and it bears repeating—the majority of today's mobile devices are simply not built with do-it-yourself repairability in mind. Some products are worse than others when it comes to home repairs and upgrades. Two products that fall into that "worse than others" category both belong to Microsoft—its latest Surface Laptop and Surface Pro models, both of which failed to make a positive impression during a teardown analysis.The folks at iFixIt show no bias when it comes to tearing apart electronic gadgets. We mention this because Apple is notorious for intentionally making its products... Read more...
The industry's emphasis on increasingly thin and light devices has not come without a cost. The do-it-yourself (DIY) repair enthusiast has largely been shunned in recent years, especially by Apple, which both thrives in the mobile space and has never really cared about making its products easy to service at home. As such, it is not the least bit surprising that its new 10.5-inch iPad Pro is a bear to repair.Apple is far from alone in this regard, it just happens to leads the charge, and in particular with its iPhone and iPad products. In this case, the company's newest iPad Pro model sticks to... Read more...
Historically speaking, all-in-one systems have not been known for their upgradeability. That has changed somewhat in recent years, with newer AIOs sporting swappable components, at least on the enthusiast end of the spectrum. The same is true of Apple's latest 21.5-inch iMac with a Retina 4K display. A teardown shows that users can access (and upgrade) both the CPU and RAM.The feasibility of upgrading these components is another matter entirely. Unlike some AIO systems that make things easy with a rear panel that pops right off, Apple glues its iMac shut. Getting inside is not unlike opening an... Read more...
Whether it is intentional or the consequence of building increasingly thinner and lighter devices with premium makeups, cracking open today's electronics for DIY repair is oftentimes difficult. Whatever the case might be, Samsung chose not to buck the trend with its Galaxy S8. As with most modern handsets, the Galaxy S8 poses various challenges to anyone attempting to get at its guts, though it is not without some redeeming qualities.The teardown experts at iFixIt put the Galaxy S8 on the operating table and proceeded to play a high-tech version of Operation, only without the buzzer and glowing... Read more...
The good news for iPad fans is that Apple's newest 9.7-inch model is the most affordable yet. Apple's upgraded tablet starts at $329, a shockingly low(er) price considering that each of its predecessors came out of the gate with a $499 starting price, and with less storage. So, that's groovy. What's not so great, however, is it continues to be a do-it-yourself repair nightmare, as a new teardown report reveals. As with previous generation iPad models, Apple locks the chassis shut on its newest model with adhesive. That means needing to apply heat around the edges and then trying to pry it open.... Read more...
If you’re one of the lucky folks that was able to secure an early pre-order for the Nintendo Switch, then chances are that your $300 console arrived yesterday (or at least should be arriving shortly). While most of us who receive a newly released console are eager to unwrap it and begin playing launch titles, the folks at iFixit have just one task in mind — immediate dissection. As iFixit does with just about every major electronics release, the Nintendo Switch has been given a thorough teardown treatment and everything is documented with excellent step-by-step photography and a complementing video.... Read more...
We are not sure of the authenticity of this one, but over at one of Baido's Chinese-language web forums is a teardown of Nintendo's not-yet-released Switch console. If it turns out to be fake, then someone put a lot of time and effort to make it appear otherwise, as the part selection lines up with what Nintendo has revealed about the Switch. The cramped layout looks legitimate to us as well.It is also possible that these naked shots reflect a prototype design and not the final console. Either way, it's an interesting view of the system's guts.The first thing that stands out is the 4,130 mAh lithium-ion... Read more...
We saw in a teardown analysis earlier this week how difficult it is to perform at-home repairs and upgrades on Microsoft's recently announced Surface Studio all-in-one desktop, which comes with several core components soldered to the motherboard, but what about the hockey puck shaped Surface Dial accessory that goes along with it? Don't hold your breath hoping that it's any less difficult to work on. About the only thing that can be done on the Surface Dial without a bucket of courage and years of experience is swap out the pair of AAA batteries as needed. The rubber bottom protecting the battery... Read more...
Microsoft recently announced its first desktop PC, the Surface Studio, a sleek looking all-in-one with some unique features. As is the trend these days, the Surface Studio is pretty thin. It's also not a system that is easy to repair at home, a teardown analysis reveals. Much of the reason for that is because Microsoft opted to solder several key components to the motherboard. Getting into the 21-pound Surface Studio isn't all that difficult, though finding a pathway isn't all that obvious, either. Flipping the AIO on its base reveals a strip of air vents that border the entire bottom panel. In... Read more...
A teardown analysis of the original PlayStation 4 console released in 2013 showed that Sony wasn't afraid to bare all its consoles naked bits. The company even posted its own teardown video, which owners of the console could use as a guide when attempting repairs or upgrading the storage drive. Well, good news for anyone who purchased a PlayStation 4 Pro (or plan to), Sony made it equally easy to tear into. As it did with the original PS4 console, Sony again posted its own official teardown video of the PS4 Pro featuring Keiichi Aoki, director of mechanical design, disassembling the new system... Read more...
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