Items tagged with ISP

Move over Google, and step aside AT&T, because here comes Cox with residential 1-gigabit Internet service of its own. Called G1GABLAST (Gigablast from here on out), the 1Gbps Internet service is now available in parts of Phoenix, Arizona; Orange County, California; Omaha, Nebraska; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Ultra high-speed Internet isn't anything new to Cox -- it's been offering business customers multi-gigabit options for over a decade. However, there's been a recent movement to bring 1Gbps service to home consumers, as both Google (Google Fiber) and AT&T (U-verse with AT&T GigaPower)... Read more...
Comcast is one of only two companies to be voted "Worst Company in America" multiple times, having come away with Consumerist's title in 2010 and again in 2014. The cable giant is aware that it has an image problem, one that largely stems from poor and sometimes downright horrid customers service, and it's going on a hiring spree as part of a plan to change the customer experience. One of the core elements of Comcast's plan is to create 5,500 customer service jobs over the next few years. Comcast hopes that this investment in workers will allow the company to always be on time for customer appointments,... Read more...
If you have an opinion that many would deem illogical, what do you do? You go find other people who think just as illogically, of course. Power in numbers, as they say. That can go for a sibling battling with another sibling over who took the last of the cupcakes just as well as it can for mega corporations like Comcast which argue that a monopoly is a good thing. Comcast's desire to absorb Time Warner Cable has been a hugely debated topic, with many believing it'd harm innovation and work against consumers, while others -- those on Comcast's side -- state the exact opposite. I say if you have... Read more...
Charter Communications this week said it's planning to acquire Bright House Networks, the sixth largest cable company in the U.S., for $10.4 billion. However, there are several contingencies, one of the biggest of which is government approval for rival Comcast to acquire Time Warner Cable, as Charter has a vested interest in the side deal. If Comcast is able to buy TWC, it has agreed to shed 1.4 million subscribers to Charter in exchange for $7.3 billion to help nudge regulators to approve the deal. Comcast said it would also divest 2.5 million subscribers as part of a spinoff into a... Read more...
What we had hoped for has come true: The Federal Communications Commission has approved net neutrality rules. Make no mistake, this is a hugely important move, and an almost surprising one given just how much it caters to keeping the Internet open. With these rules, ISPs will be unable to throttle the data that passes through their pipes, and they certainly can't charge companies for "fast lane" privileges. The Internet will be open, free... period. Well, you know, we can just ignore the fact that the government will continue to do whatever eavesdropping it wants - but that's totally unrelated... Read more...
Dan Gilbert, majority owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers, is no stranger to making bold claims. After LeBron James left the Cavs to sign with the Miami Heat several years ago, he made a personal "guarantee that the Cleveland Cavaliers will win an NBA Championship before the self-titled former 'King' wins one," a statement he typed in all caps for emphasis. It didn't work out that way, though he's still making big promises, the latest of which is that an Internet Service Provider (ISP) he's launching will deliver speeds on par with or faster than Google Fiber. His new ISP is called Rocket Fiber and... Read more...
In a perfect world, none of us would have to call customer service, but alas, the world is far from perfect. And so too is the customer service we're talking about. No one likes having to deal with the hassle of ringing up customer service for help or a request, but that dislike gets amplified when the company behind this customer service is a cable or Internet provider. Unless you've somehow managed to avoid the Internet these past few years, you're probably well aware of the enormous number of horror stories that have stemmed from the customer service departments of companies like Comcast and... Read more...
We reported earlier this week that the FCC was expected to issue a new net neutrality proposal this week, and as we can now see, it hasn't taken long to get a follow-up. In fact, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler has gone the extra mile by penning his own piece for Wired so that we could learn about this new proposal in layman's terms. As we hoped, the FCC will in fact be proposing that our Internet access will be classified as Title II, which would put it in the same category that power companies fall into. As far as many people are concerned, including myself, Title II is the only way we can guarantee... Read more...
Well, here's some long overdue progress. It's expected that on Thursday, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler will issue a proposal that works in net neutrality's favor, and fortunately, a vote will take place just a few weeks later. Wheeler's proposal would make our Internet access a Title II utility. That means that it'd be regulated in much the same way as public utilities, such as power, but it's expected that this proposal will stop short of having any oversight on pricing. Flickr: Stephen Melkisethian One of the greatest benefits of putting our Internet access under Title II is that fast lanes will... Read more...
The concept of net neutrality has been a hot-button topic over the past few years, particularly as evidence by fundamental ISP misconduct that has grown more prevalent. In addition, an increasing number of customers have found themselves caught in the crossfire between two huge corporations (ISPs and content providers especially) with little to no recourse... Net neutrality is an attractive concept, particularly if you've followed the ways the cable and telco companies have gouged customers in recent years, and I'm a fan of the idea on some level -- but only to a limited extent. There are two problems... Read more...
On Wednesday morning, every single Time Warner Cable Internet subscriber found themselves without access to the World Wide Web. Internet downtime isn't entirely uncommon, of course, but it is when we're talking this kind of scale. The worst of it in this particular event is that the downtime wasn't caused by hardware dying; rather, a maintainence worker accidentally submitted a bunk configuration, which propogated across the entire network. Given the fact that this incident was completely avoidable and that it affected such an enormous number of people, TWC has found itself in hot water over this.... Read more...
A couple of hours before folks on the east coast could see this past Wednesday's sunrise, some found themselves battling to get webpages to load, or found themselves without Internet entirely. It'd be understandable in this situation to jump to the assumption that a DDoS has taken place, since it's become (far too) common lately, but this partial outage had nothing to do with that. Instead, it hinged entirely on aging networking equipment. BGP is a virtually unknown acronym to the end user - even those who might know a little bit about general networking - but it's integral to making the Internet... Read more...
Those who place a high value on in-home Internet have long envied the portion of the United States population within a Verizon FiOS footprint. While the fiber-based service stopped expanding to new areas years back, Verizon has continued to push its existing areas to new heights. Now, it's doing so once again, and we're certainly hopeful that it triggers a cascade of followers throughout the ISP industry -- but, of course, we aren't holding our breath. In order to better compete with cable companies that are boosting Internet speeds, Verizon has announced plans to offer symmetrical connections.... Read more...
From the beginning, the anti-net neutrality argument has been built on a single premise: Give companies free rein to charge more money for services, and they'll respond by improving the customer experience, rolling out service to more people, and aggressively adopting faster technology. Over the past few months, Netflix has served as an unofficial test drive for this theory -- the company has begun paying both Comcast and Verizon directly to improve Netflix performance. The result?  Comcast, at least, has improved dramatically. Verizon, on the other hand, continues to crater -- its FiOS service... Read more...
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