Items tagged with Chrome

If you’re an Android user that makes heavy use of Google’s Chrome web browser (and what Android user doesn’t?), you’ll want to pay close attention to a new exploit that has the capability of taking your smartphone hostage. The tricky exploit was demonstrated at MobilePwn2Own, which was held at a Tokyo-based PacSec conference. Quihoo 360 security researcher Guang Gong first uncovered the vulnerability, and thankfully, he hasn’t publicly revealed detailed specifics on its inner workings. However, we do know that it takes advantage of Chrome’s open source V8 JavaScript engine. What makes the exploit... Read more...
Sound the alarm, Google's ending support for its Chrome browser in Windows XP and Windows Vista! You there, on your outdated Mac, quit snickering -- Google's also cutting off support for Mac OS X versions 10.6 (Snow Leopard), 10.7 (Lion), and 10.8 (Mountain Lion). If you're rocking one of these older OSes, continue using Chrome at your own risk.Chrome will still work and dutifully load up webpages as it shuttles you around the web. However, starting in April of next year, Google will stop issuing security updates and fixes. That in essence puts a big target on your back with a flashing neon sign... Read more...
Since 2010, Google has offered support in the desktop version of Chrome for push notifications. To help make that feature even more useful, it eventually introduced a notification center, not too dissimilar from what Microsoft offers in Windows 10. With an emerging push standard, though, Google has been forced to reevaluate things. Via a new blog post, Google lets us know that it will be removing that push notification center from all desktop versions of Chrome (Windows/Linux/OS X). What makes this decision easy for Google to make is that it seems very little people actually made use of it. Writes... Read more...
The Internet is an ever changing congruous mass of standards, design, and interoperability challenges. Keeping on top of it all can be a daunting task. It's a delicate balance between features, security and performance. If you're considering swapping out your web browser for something new and fresh, but are uncertain over the real world performance differences, this article should help with lots of insight. Features are not something that can be easily compared, and will be up to you to decide what you want in a browser. As for security, that is in a constant state of flux, and issuing metrics... Read more...
Much to the chagrin of some and to the delight of others, YouTube is force feeding pre-video advertisements in their entirety to Chrome browser users who have ad blocking extensions like AdBlock installed. Those affected also point out that the Skip Now button that would normally allow them to sidestep an ad after a few seconds of viewing doesn't appear when attempting to block ads in Chrome. It's not entirely clear if this is an intentional move by Google. AdBlock Plus designer Ben Williams told The Inquirer that it's "an issue in Chrome" that only affects "a small subset of users." As far as... Read more...
It's no secret that Google's Chrome browser loves to hog RAM. In fact, it sometimes seems like it wouldn't matter how much RAM is tossed at the browser - it's going to find a way to eat it up. Months ago, I had such bad experiences with this that the browser would lag my entire PC (and that was with 16GB of RAM!), an issue that a subsequent beta ended up fixing. Still, proper memory fixes in Chrome are long, long overdue, because when the issues are bad enough to spawn an entire meme, there's a definite need for attention. Fortunately, attention is being paid to this, and with the brand-new version... Read more...
Can I get an “Amen” from the congregation? The planets are aligning and it appears that more heavy-hitters are throwing support behind taking down one the Internet’s greatest villains: Adobe Flash. Back in June, we brought you news that Google would be introducing a new “Intelligent Pause” function to Chrome that would disable all Flash content by default (or give Chrome the option to choose what Flash content is deemed worthy). If for some reason you actually need to access a blocked Flash element on a site, you will have the option to click on the element to re-enable it. Google favors HTML5... Read more...
Chrome on OS X is a battery hog. It’s been known for a while that compared to Apple’s stock Safari browser, Chrome has a tendency to eat up CPU cycles and use excess amounts of memory. Google took a step earlier this month to combat this problem by reining in the much-hated Adobe Flash Player plugin. Using what Google calls “Intelligent Pause,” Chrome can decide for itself whether a particular Flash element is worth displaying to the user. If isn’t, it will be disabled, thus helping to save your laptop’s battery from prematurel discharging. But Adobe isn’t the only party at fault when it comes... Read more...
Just as humans are capable of communicating with each other verbally, what if PCs could do the same thing? That's sort of the idea behind Tone, a Chrome browser extension cooked up by Google that, at this early stage, is pretty rudimentary but also interesting. In its current state, Tone can broadcast the URL of the current tab to any machine within earshot that also has the extension installed. What's the point? Google argues that the simple concept of sharing has become more complex than it needs to be during this day and age of digital devices. Email and chat exist and are great for long distance... Read more...
Google on Wednesday announced that it will actively block Windows and Mac users from installing extensions to the Chrome browser that are not found in the Chrome Web Store. It's the same policy that's been in place for Windows users since May of last year, though Google didn't enforce it for the developer version of Chrome. Now it will, as increasingly complex malware is becoming too big of a problem. "We originally did not enforce this policy on the Windows developer channel in order to allow developers to opt out. Unfortunately, we’ve since observed malicious software forcing users into the developer... Read more...
Developers have a new tool for testing their websites on Chrome for Android, thanks to a Dev channel Google just released. Google has long made the Dev channel available to ChromeOS, Linux, Mac and Windows. Now, Android is part of the crew. The Dev channel ends up being a two-way street. Google gets your direct feedback on its pre-release Chrome features so it can weed out bugs before the version goes mainstream. The benefit for you is that you can see how the upcoming version of Chrome will handle your website. You’ll get an early look at potential problems, but you also get a sneak peek at features... Read more...
It's not too often that Chrome browser updates are particularly notable these days since Google uses a rapid release cycle that sees frequent upgrades. But every once in awhile there's an update that brings something interesting to the table rather than mostly bug fixes. Case in point, Google this week promoted Chrome 42 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac, and Linux, and with the numerical update comes support for the Push API and Notifications API.When used in conjunction with one another, these APIs allow websites to send notifications to Chrome even after closing out the site in question.... Read more...
It's always fun to see which security flaws get exploited at Pwn2Own, and this year's event has proven to be no exception. In fact, it could be considered to be one of the most exciting events to date, with JungHoon Lee exploiting three major browsers, and securing a record $110,000 payout for one of the flaws. Starting the day off, JungHoon (aka: lokihardt) breached a time-of-check to time-of-use vulnerability in the 64-bit version of Internet Explorer, breaking out of the sandbox via a privileged JavaScript injection, allowing him to execute medium-integrity code. This flaw netted JungHoon $65,000.... Read more...
Google has long offered some serious protection in its Chrome Web browser from malicious software, and in some cases, I'd almost call it too protective. Nonetheless, the warnings the browser provides are good, because as unfortunate as it is, a lot of people end up downloading and installing something that's bundling more than they're bargaining for. Well, with Google's latest update to its 'SafeBroswing' mechanism, the level of protection is being taken step further. Now, if a site is known to be hosting malicious software, a warning will come up before the person is able to enter the website.... Read more...
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