Items tagged with cherry trail

We dug the original Intel Compute Stick that launched last year. If you recall, the original Compute Stick was a tiny, Atom-powered device that could turn any HDMI-equipped display into a basic PC. The low-power nature of the Compute Stick meant it was ideally suited for every-day, less-demanding computing tasks, and wasn’t a replacement for a full-on PC or notebook, but it was a relatively capable device given its ultra-small form factor.The original Compute Stick wasn’t without its issues, though. Last year’s model featured dated 802.11n wireless connectivity built in and had only a single USB... Read more...
Intel really lit a fire under PC OEMs when it launched its Compute Stick earlier this year (you can read the Hot Hardware review right here). The tiny little mini PC fits in the palm of your hand and packs in a Bay Trail-based Atom Z3735F processor. We’ve seen the world’s largest PC OEM, Lenovo, come out with its own interpretation and now ASUS is bringing its own sleek offering to the table. The ASUS VivoStick does away with the hard edges and complete lack of style presented by the Intel Compute Stick and the Lenovo ideacenter Stick 300 by adopting a smooth shape and gentle curves. If the Intel... Read more...
Earlier this morning, Lenovo covered its bases in the consumer space with three new notebook lines. Tonight, the company has turned its attention to the business-oriented ThinkPad 10 tablet (you can read our review of the previous model here), which has received a thorough makeover with improved performance and admirable battery life. Front and center is the 10.1-inch 1900x1200 IPS display that supports 10-point multi-touch and is protected by Gorilla Glass 3 (an optional Anti-Glare Film is a $30 option). Powering ThinkPad 10 is either the brand spanking new Intel Atom x5-Z8500 (1.44GHz base, 2.24GHz... Read more...
The Consumer Electronics Show is about to get underway, and Intel is leading the pack with a set of CPU announcements. It has been six months since the company took the lid off its first 14nm processor, the Core M, but that CPU is designed for the ultramobile, low-power market. Consumers who wanted to tap Intel's 14nm products in more mainstream notebook hardware had to wait a bit longer until the Q1 2015 time frame.This new SoC is a "tick" in Intel's tick-tock plan, which means it's mostly a die shrink of the existing Haswell architecture -- at least, on the CPU side. On the GPU side, there's... Read more...