Nintendo Announces 3D Version Of DS Handheld: No Glasses Required

Oh, boy. 3D really might be taking over the world. In all honesty, we won't believe that until Google announces a 3D version of their search engine, but believe us, it's probably already in the works. Just when you thought there couldn't possibly be another 3D announcement on the horizon, Nintendo (of all companies!) comes out and hits the world in the face with this one: a 3D version of the popular DS portable gaming handheld.

As you may expect, Nintendo will be calling the system the 3DS, which just happens to work out really well for them. But what's interesting isn't that a company who broke new ground by introducing the world to motion gaming (with the Wii remote), but how it'll be done. The new 3D handheld won't require the same 3D glasses that the vast majority of consumer 3D systems do today. According to reports, it will "allow users to play three-dimensional (3D) games without using special glasses."

Also wild is that the console will be able to "play titles created for previous DS models and will be launched in the financial year starting in April." This isn't the first we've heard of 3D in the gaming world; Sony already acknowledged that 3D games would be coming to the PlayStation 3, but bringing 3D to a handheld is definitely a first. Other third-party companies have created "skins" that give a faux 3D impression on existing devices, but this marks the first time a major console maker has went out and done things on their own.



Unfortunately, details about the 3DS are still scarce. We're hearing that more details will be available in June at the annual E3 expo in California, but we suspect it will use the same larger screens that are found in the recently release DSi XL. We also hope that whatever technology Nintendo will be using to deliver 3D without glasses can also be used on HDTVs. We think 3D as a whole would take off far faster if no one had to sit around donning those.

Tags:  Gaming, Nintendo, 3D, Handheld, DS, DSi
Via:  Reuters
blog comments powered by Disqus