Gigabyte Announces Next-Gen Support For Existing 6-Series Boards

BIOS updates are flowing over at Gigabyte, as the motherboard maker announced support for Intel’s 22nm Ivy Bridge chips and PCI Express 3.0 in its 6-series motherboards. The company is looking to stay current on support for the latest technologies and apparently didn’t want to wait to put out a new line of boards before rolling out some upgrades to its customers. The BIOS update is available for 6-series boards--almost four dozen of them, actually, all running the Z68, P67/H67, or H61 chipsets.

Usually, BIOS updates are a bit of a snore, but this one is a doozy in that it delivers support for two exciting new technologies in one stroke, without requiring users to buy a new motherboard. Gigabyte customers have reason to be pleased today.


GIGABYTE Announces Entire 6 Series Ready to Support Native PCIe Gen. 3
Future Proof Your Platform for Next Generation Intel 22nm CPUs
2011/08/08
 
City of Industry, California, August 8, 2011 - GIGABYTE TECHNOLOGY Co., Ltd, a leading manufacturer of motherboards, graphics cards and computing hardware solutions today announced their entire range of 6 series motherboards are ready to support the next generation Intel 22nm CPUs (LGA1155 Socket) as well as offer native support for PCI Express Gen. 3 technology, delivering maximum data bandwidth for future discrete graphics cards.
Wanting to provide maximum upgradeability to customers, GIGABYTE has enabled native support for PCI Express Gen. 3 across the entire range of GIGABYTE 6 series motherboards, including the recently launched G1.Sniper 2 motherboard, when paired with Intel’s next generation 22nm CPUs. By installing the latest BIOS for their 6 series motherboards today, users can be assured they are ready to take advantage of all the performance enhancements tomorrow’s technologies have to offer.
To future proof your GIGABYTE 6 series motherboard, please download and install the latest BIOS update for your motherboard model from the GIGABYTE website: www.gigabyte.us.


Via:  Gigabyte
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