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iOS 7 is Now Installed on 74 Percent of Apple Devices

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News Posted: Fri, Dec 6 2013 12:32 PM
Apple catches a lot of flak for keeping its ecosystem so locked down and, at times, unnecessarily restrictive in functionality, but one thing that works in the company's favor is that nearly all iOS users are on the same page, so to speak. Users don't get to choose between tons of different hardware devices like they do in Android's world, and while that's a bummer -- a phablet sized iPhone would be groovy, for example -- the upside is that fragmentation hardly exists.

According to Apple's developer page, 74 percent of Apple's mobile devices are running iOS 7. That means nearly three out of every four iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad device is equipped with the latest version of Apple's mobile OS. Another 22 percent are sticking it out with iOS 6, and only 4 percent are running an earlier version.

iOS 7

It's quite a different picture than Android. At present, 1.1 percent of Android devices are running the latest release, version 4.4 KitKat. To be fair, KitKat is fairly new, but even after a year and two months on the market, Jelly Bean (version 4.1.x - 4.3) is only found on 54.5 percent of Android devices. Another 18.6 percent are running Ice Cream Sandwich, followed by 24.1 percent using Gingerbread, 1.6 percent on Froyo, and 0.1 percent on Honeycomb.

We're not posting those figures to disparage Android. Even though users are spread out across various versions, the upside is far greater choice over devices. Android users also have an open playground to play in, with a robust community of modders and ROM developers. Most devices can be rooted and upgraded if you're willing to spend some time tinkering.

Still, there's an advantage to having users on the same page. Getting back to Apple, the penetration rate of iOS 7 is a motivating factor for developers trying to reach as many customers as possible. Since so many users are updated, an app developed and optimized for iOS 7 will have a potentially large audience to tap into.
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SmogHog replied on Fri, Dec 6 2013 9:55 PM

"Users don't get to choose between tons of different hardware devices like they do in Android's world"

And why would this be a good thing?

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Way to chop off the quote mid-sentence:

"Users don't get to choose between tons of different hardware devices like they do in Android's world, and while that's a bummer -- a phablet sized iPhone would be groovy, for example -- the upside is that fragmentation hardly exists."

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SmogHog replied on Sat, Dec 7 2013 8:33 PM

It was cut off purposely to ask that question that has obvious answers

Ripoff the customer

Corporate greed

It's never a good thing.

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Joel H replied on Sun, Dec 8 2013 2:34 PM

I have an iPhone 4S and am currently quite happy with iOS 6. I upgraded in August, only when a battery bug started shutting my phone down at 45% charge. I did it as a last-ditch attempt to fix the problem rather than buying new hardware -- and it worked. Well and good.

iOS 6 is fine, but I'm somewhat grumpy at the replacement of Google Maps -- even if Apple Maps no longer deposits people in corn fields. Unfortunately Google Maps has its own annoying behaviors, and wants to make me sign in to use it, as if history can't be saved locally.

The only reason to upgrade to iOS 7, as far as I can tell, is the unified browser bar and the ability to block calls. Those are nice features, but I don't feel like switching to Day-Glo icons, slower overall performance, and battery-draining animations I'll promptly disable because the phone can't go more than about 5 hours between charges in any case.

Almost all of the high-end Android phones have expanded to the point that they no longer fit comfortably in my hand, so I expect I'll be sticking with Apple when I upgrade -- but I've gotten two years out of this phone and see no reason it won't last me several years more.

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