Google Fiber for Austin Confirmed, Rollout to Occur in Mid-2014

rated by 0 users
This post has 12 Replies | 2 Followers

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 25,801
Points 1,163,670
Joined: Sep 2007
ForumsAdministrator
News Posted: Tue, Apr 9 2013 1:57 PM

We posted a rumor over the weekend that Google's high-speed Fiber Internet service should be hitting up Austin soon, and today, the company confirms it. The announcement was made in the city today, along with mayor Lee Leffingwell, and Google's decision to choose Austin to follow-up to the dual Kansas City's can be summed up in one sentence: "[Austin is] a mecca for creativity and entrepreneurialism, with thriving artistic and tech communities, as well as the University of Texas and its new medical research hospital."

While that's all fine and good, there's little doubt that the jealousy of those not in Austin or Kansas City has just been amplified. However, it's great to see another rollout come so soon, as the completed rollout for KC only completed a couple of months ago.

To help put Google's Fiber into perspective, a single HD movie through Netflix weighs about 2GBs. With a 1Gbit/s connection, that entire 2GB could be downloaded in 16 seconds - if the server allowed it. This is based on the simple conversion of 1,000Mbit/s equaling 125MB/s (1Mbit = 1.25MB/s). At 1Gbit/s, Google's Internet package is rated at least 20x faster than most fiber connections everyone else around the US has been able to get up to this point. In many ways, it's speeds that many of us hoped to see in the future way back when 3Mbit/s packages were considered the norm.

Like Kansas City, Austin will be able to partake in the same available packages; Internet and Internet + TV. Interestingly, pricing hasn't been established yet, which leads us to believe that it could wind up being more expensive than what KC pays. Undoubtedly, current pricing from other ISPs in the area will lend itself to the final pricing for Google's service. However, for what Google Fiber actually offers, it seems unlikely too many would mind paying a couple of extra dollars for the privilege of having it.

  • | Post Points: 95
Top 200 Contributor
Posts 358
Points 2,565
Joined: Sep 2011

Lucky! I'm jealous. =)

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 50 Contributor
Posts 3,092
Points 38,110
Joined: Aug 2003
Location: Texas
acarzt replied on Tue, Apr 9 2013 3:15 PM

Your math is a bit off...

"To help put Google's Fiber into perspective, a single HD movie through Netflix weighs about 2GBs. With a 1Gbit/s connection, that entire 2GB could be downloaded in 8 seconds - if the server allowed it. This is based on the simple conversion of 1,000Mbit/s equaling 125MB/s (1Mbit = 1.25MB/s). "

2GB download at 1Gbps would take 16 Seconds. 1,000Mbps does equal 125MBps but 1Mb actually equals .125MB. There are 8 bits in a byte. The Theoretical limit is 1,000Mbps the actually rate will be around 600Mbps which would mean about 27 seconds to download an entire 2GB file.

The same file on my twc connection which i usually see about 18Mbps would take almost 15 minutes.

I live in Austin, and I CANNOT WAIT til I get this :-D

  • | Post Points: 50
Top 150 Contributor
Posts 608
Points 5,495
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Canada
ForumsAdministrator
Moderator

Ctrl + F5. Your browser rendered it wrong.

 * RWilliams runs to fix error before acarzt can do that.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 500 Contributor
Posts 187
Points 2,015
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Fenton, Michigan

Congratulations Austin, TX... someday I'm hoping to see Google fiber where I live. :)

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Posts 2
Points 10
Joined: Apr 2013

Ahh the Rob. Full story from the event is here. http://googlefiberatx.com/2013/04/google-fiber-austin-announcement-in-summary/

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Posts 730
Points 5,865
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Lewisville, TX
Clixxer replied on Tue, Apr 9 2013 7:49 PM

acarzt:

Your math is a bit off...

"To help put Google's Fiber into perspective, a single HD movie through Netflix weighs about 2GBs. With a 1Gbit/s connection, that entire 2GB could be downloaded in 8 seconds - if the server allowed it. This is based on the simple conversion of 1,000Mbit/s equaling 125MB/s (1Mbit = 1.25MB/s). "

2GB download at 1Gbps would take 16 Seconds. 1,000Mbps does equal 125MBps but 1Mb actually equals .125MB. There are 8 bits in a byte. The Theoretical limit is 1,000Mbps the actually rate will be around 600Mbps which would mean about 27 seconds to download an entire 2GB file.

The same file on my twc connection which i usually see about 18Mbps would take almost 15 minutes.

I live in Austin, and I CANNOT WAIT til I get this :-D

I want to really move down there now. I was jealous Kansas got it before Texas but now that it will be just down 35 I am REALLY jealous.

My rig - I7-4770K, ASUS Z87-A Mobo, 16 GB Corsair Ram, AMD 7990 GPU, CoolIT AiO Cooler, NZXT H630

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 1,016
Points 10,925
Joined: Dec 2010
Location: Mcallen, Texas
OSunday replied on Tue, Apr 9 2013 9:04 PM

Seeing this rubs it in my face that I chose school in Colorado over Austin... Maybe I'll get lucky and fiber will make its way over here eventually too since I've read a little bit about the main criteria being choosing locations where it's least expensive to implement with the maximum amount of usage/customers.

Austin was chosen because it doesn't have a huge underground network of existing wiring or something like that but uses primarily power lines or above ground methods so the cost is much lower by not having to dig things up.

So far in two cities, Google managed to set them up for under $100 million and Austin is estimated around the 50 mil ballpark.

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Posts 1
Points 20
Joined: Apr 2013
BruceW07 replied on Sat, Apr 13 2013 7:12 PM

Math: "2GB download at 1Gbps would take 16 Seconds. 1,000Mbps does equal 125MBps but 1Mb actually equals .125MB. There are 8 bits in a byte."

There are 8 bits in a byte, resting comfortably on your harddrive, but in transmission over the internet, there are actually 10 bits in a byte, so 1000 Mb/s is 100 MB/s, and the theoretical limit for transmitting your 2 GB file over a 1000 Mb/s connection would be 20 seconds.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 150 Contributor
Posts 730
Points 5,865
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Lewisville, TX
Clixxer replied on Sun, Apr 14 2013 12:01 AM

16 seconds, 27 seconds, or 20 seconds? Is anyone really going to complain over the face you really have to wait maybe an extra 15 seconds. I'm sure most customer wouldn't care as long as its faster than what they currently have.

My rig - I7-4770K, ASUS Z87-A Mobo, 16 GB Corsair Ram, AMD 7990 GPU, CoolIT AiO Cooler, NZXT H630

  • | Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Posts 1
Points 5
Joined: Apr 2013
ChrisBobb replied on Fri, Apr 19 2013 3:05 PM

Dallas, GA please! ~

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 8,571
Points 103,110
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
MembershipAdministrator
Moderator
realneil replied on Fri, Apr 19 2013 9:44 PM

Clixxer:
as long as its faster

Yes, speed is everything!! Stick out tongue

Dogs are great judges of character, and if your dog doesn't like somebody being around, you shouldn't trust them.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 150 Contributor
Posts 730
Points 5,865
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: Lewisville, TX
Clixxer replied on Mon, Apr 22 2013 1:19 AM

Yep. I got a 50mb line from Verizon now and it does make the 30mb line I had seems slower. I went from 3.2-3.5 to 7.1-7.3 downloading off steam. I just wanna see Google fiber in action now.

My rig - I7-4770K, ASUS Z87-A Mobo, 16 GB Corsair Ram, AMD 7990 GPU, CoolIT AiO Cooler, NZXT H630

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (13 items) | RSS