Computer Unable to boot

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OSunday Posted: Thu, Nov 22 2012 1:43 AM

Alright, So I recently upgraded my computer to a Ivy Bridge Core i5, on a Gigabyte Ga-268XP-UD3P motherboard and it's being cooled by a corsair H100.

I'm not sure why but everything turns on,all fans spin up and the bios loading screen appears on the monitor, BUT it won't go any further than that.

It won't respond to any of the function key commands to go to the boot menu etc., and after about 15 seconds it turns its self off and restarts.
I'm not sure what's going on at all.

I thought it might have been the cpu having cooling issues due to thermal paste since the pad that came on the H100 was looking mighty thin, so I took it off the cpu, cleaned it and put artic silver 5 in an even coat across the cpu chip.
That didn't solve the problem.

Anyone have any idea what could be going wrong?
Theres correct RAM in the Slots, the Video Card is working since it displays the opening BIOS screen, and there are 3x HD's plugged into it 

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rrplay replied on Thu, Nov 22 2012 8:25 PM

Just a few suggestions that may help

Try to clear the BIOS  completely and boot with 1 disk drive and 1 memory stick with Optimized defaults. Unplug / and test keyboard and mouse to navigate the BIOS settings and see if the memory has the XMP profile ..what memory stick do you have? Do you have a different keyboard to try ? and which version of the GB board do you have ? version 1.0 or 2.0  and which bios? Could be a wonky sata cable on one of the drives too.

If you have a reset switch on the chassis,can you restart before the system restarts itself?  

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OSunday replied on Mon, Nov 26 2012 7:58 PM

So the goal of my troubleshooting was too fix the computer before thanksgiving ended to bring it back up with me to college, but alas that didn't end up happening.

I won't be able to work on it till I go home in about a month.

It has 4x4GB Gskill Ram sticks at 1600mhz.

I tried it with one hard drive (the one with the operating system) plugged in and attempted to navigate the opening bios splash screen with a usb keyboard, directly plugged into the motherboard, through a hub as well as a PS/2 keyboard (in case any of the other I was testing required some sort of driver support or something of the sort) and still nothing.

I'm not sure why but it seems like it was freezing during the bios splash screen since I was never able to navigate through it at all and it wouldn't respond to any keys through a couple of different keyboards. I'm going to take everything out of the desktop and try and run it minimalistically and  barebones with a vga monitor again when i go home to see if that fixes things. If not I'm afraid I'm gonna have to maybe use the reset button on the motherboard (to reset the Bios?) and if not I'll try out using the desktops reset switch to see if I can reset before it restarts its self

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rrplay replied on Tue, Nov 27 2012 1:41 PM

just wanted too add that sometimes when troubleshooting some issues that could be memory related ..

try taking out the memory and resetting the cpu and put one stick in the first slot and see if you have a solid post and can enter the bios.

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Dorkstar replied on Wed, Nov 28 2012 5:03 PM

We used to go by an acronym for troubleshooting, and to this day I can't remember what it is.

But anyhow, narrowing down your problem isn't too difficult.

Disconnect everything that isn't necessary for you to get to a windows screen.  Then slowly start putting things back in one at a time, 1 stick of ram, then 2, then 3... you get the picture.  If your computer boots just fine, putting the items back in will tell you if that particular part is bad.  If it doesn't, then you'll need to troubleshoot further.  Obviously taking the CMOS battery out or using the reset switch/jumper to reset your bios is also a good, easy, idea as well. 

  I had a similar problem a while back, ended up being something I accidentally changed in the bios that was causing my computer to attempt to PXE boot.  Hopefully you're issue was as simple, yet heartbreaking for those hours while in doubt, as my issue was.

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OSunday replied on Wed, Nov 28 2012 9:53 PM

Yeah that's what I was in the process of doing before my Thanksgiving leave ended and now my computers half way disassembled on my desk back at home -.-

But the thing is I haven't had a chance to mess with any of the setting, I haven't got it up and running once just yet! 
This is with a whole new motherboard and processor so I haven't ever run it before or had an opportunity to even get into the BiOS setting to change anything.

I contacted Gigabyte for support, and they suggested using a display running of the onboard HDMI of the motherboard so I think that could potentially be a could fix, but the cycling reboot is what scares me for the troubleshooting process.

I'm definitely gonna give this a disassemble/reassemble attempt and see what I can do and let you guys know how it turns out!
I appreciate the help, and it'll also allow me to post a thank you to HotHardware and show the setup to other members since it's with a motherboard I was graciously given in a give-away last year and at first, didn't have $ for the processor to match since I had an AMD board and then when I finally got around to making my purchase I got whisked away to basic training at the Air Force Academy!
Christmas Leave is in a month for me so when I'm done with class and finals, this baby is gonna be my #1 priority till it's all fixed and running 

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Dorkstar replied on Thu, Nov 29 2012 12:39 PM

I've never had a new build go smoothly.  Well I take that back, I had a enough spare parts from old builds laying around to put together a little media PC 2 months ago.  I spent 4 hours troubleshooting because I couldn't get the computer to POST at all.  Come to find out my HDMI cable was just barely disconnected on the back of the TV, and everything was actually running just fine.

  No matter what the problem is, 90% of the time it's because you made one small little error that's going to take you hours to figure out.  

  Check back with us when you get a chance to test it out, I've got some other thoughts, but you'll need to verify you don't have any bad components before we send you on an 10 hourtroubleshooting journey.

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acarzt replied on Tue, Dec 4 2012 2:31 PM

It sounds like you have either a heat issue or a bad PSU.

The fan on the H100 could be spinning but is the water pump pumping water?

How are you connecting the power for the H100?

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OSunday replied on Sat, Jan 5 2013 3:04 AM

I finally think I may have isolated the problem

It turns out that the build I put together with the Motherboard I won from HotHardware is a Z68 chipset that is compatible with the ivy-bridge processor I'm using but it came out before ivy bridge did.

Because of that, it only works through a BIOS update.
The thing is, how the heck am I supposed to update the BIOS without having a processor it can use?
Does anyone know of anything or is my only possible solution to buy or get my hands on an 1155 Sandy Bridge to apply the Bios update and then swap up the Ivy-bridge? 

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Kidbest100 replied on Fri, Apr 26 2013 11:02 PM

ooooh... That would do it...

Yeah that actually makes sense.  It sounds like the thing is Kaput until you get your hands on a sandy bridge...

This is the kind of thing that gives us reasons why we research... and research our research, before we buy our parts.

 

Best of luck to you :)

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