Lenovo Introduces Ruggedized Laptop For Students

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News Posted: Tue, Dec 6 2011 11:31 AM

Lenovo is hoping to attract the attention of schools and students with the introduction of a new laptop that has been ruggedized for education. Lenovo recognizes that kids can be hard on electronics, so the company has designed the new ThinkPad X130e with a reinforced and extra durable top cover, keyboard and hinges. Key durability features include a top cover rubber bumper, reinforced and recessed ports, stronger hinges, and a stronger bezel. This 11.6-inch ultraportable laptop offers AMD Fusion E-300 and E-450 or Intel second generation Core i3-2367M ULV processors. You'll also find AMD Radeon or Intel HD-powered graphics onboard. The ThinkPad X130e weighs less than four pounds and touts a battery life up to 8.5 hours. The ThinkPad X130e laptop will be available Dec. 20 with a price tag that starts at $469.

New Lenovo ThinkPad Laptop Ruggedized For Students and Schools

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC – December 6, 2011: Lenovo announced today the ThinkPad X130e laptop, specially ruggedized for education and with the features needed to help students in grades K-12 and their schools get the most out of their PC technology. Equipped with the advanced technology expected for an educational laptop, the ThinkPad X130e comes with choices of the latest Intel or AMD processors and fast, integrated graphics as well as wireless connectivity and multimedia tools for today’s digital learning. Designed to be handled by kids, the ThinkPad X130e has a reinforced and extra durable top cover, keyboard and hinges. Schools will also like its performance, reliability and customizable options including asset tags, BIOS modifications, custom imaging and a broad selection of custom colors1.

“At Lenovo ThinkTank 2011 we brought hundreds of distinguished educators together, and the resounding feature CIOs told us that ranks highest on their list of features important for PC purchases is ‘ruggedness’,” said Dilip Bhatia, vice president, ThinkPad Business Unit, Lenovo. “While we’ve built tough products for years that pass many military-grade tests, we’ve made specific improvements required for a laptop to be successful in an education environment with the ThinkPad X130e.”

Laptops with Serious Substance

The ThinkPad X130e laptop helps students get more out of their day. This 11.6-inch lightweight ultraportable has the processing performance students need for assignments requiring multitasking with choices of AMD Fusion E-300 and E-450 or Intel second generation Core i3-2367M ULV processors. For multimedia-intensive lessons, the laptop kicks in its AMD Radeon or Intel HD-powered graphics to give students a rich visual experience.

“Having a purpose-built device designed to improve learning for students is a critical foundation for education transformation,” said Paige Johnson, education strategist, Intel. “Lenovo’s ThinkPad X130e laptop powered by Intel Core i3 processors provides the capability and functions that students need for a 21st Century education.”

At under four pounds2, students can easily carry the laptop between classes without the need to recharge since the battery lasts the whole school day, and even long enough to start homework after school - up to 8.5 hours3. Throughout the course of a typical school day, students’ laptops are often subject to extreme wear and tear. To help school-proof them, the X130e has several heavy-duty features including:

  • A top cover rubber bumper to absorb impacts to the side of the laptop
  • 33 percent stronger corner to reduce the chance of damage when dropped at an angle
  • Stronger hinges to outlast even the most frequent PC user at up to 30,000 cycles
  • Reinforced and recessed ports to decrease the effects of student “wear and tear”
  • Stronger Bezel with 1.2mm thick plastic to protect the LED panel

The ThinkPad X130e laptop has the tools students need most for today’s digital learning environment. They can use the low-light webcam to communicate with students in other schools across the world or just across town. They can also easily connect via WiFi and even keep their connection while moving from class to class using Lenovo’s Instant Resume function. With HDMI and VGA out, students can present their reports to the class with a projector or bigscreen TV.

Making Students & Schools More Efficient

Learning can’t wait, so Lenovo developed fast-booting PCs, like the X130e laptop that starts in less than 20 seconds using Lenovo’s RapidBoot technology4. Built-in self-help tools like Rescue and Recovery and Access Connections help decrease calls to school IT support, allowing students to recover damaged files and to store and connect easily to different WiFi networks.

Additionally, Lenovo offers a broad range of optional services for the ThinkPad X130e laptop, starting with custom colors. Lenovo’s image services help keep IT teams focused on enhancing learning, not chasing device drivers and tediously loading images onto each PC manually. Asset tagging services help keep track of PCs left on the school bus or classroom, and Accidental Damage Protection services can help keep a check on repair budgets. And if the PC needs to be fixed, Lenovo’s Hard Drive Retention service protects students’ digital information.

Pricing and Availability

The ThinkPad X130e laptop will be available starting Dec. 20 from business partners and on www.lenovo.com. Pricing for models starts at $469.

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good price for a pretty good machine.

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I need to get my hands on one of these things to test out. We use Dell Netbooks in the school program I work in and they are also "ruggedized" yeah right these things are always getting damaged. I have to be thankful for a full 3 year accidental protection warranty though. I wonder if they thought about the keyboards and mouse buttons those always seem to break as well on these things from so much usage. Time to get a sample :) the only thing I could see killing this would be the reversed mouse buttons. They seem to be encouraging users to use the eraser head mouse which for kids is going to be a total fail.

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i've always wanted to truly see what "ruggedized" translates into- i've only ever dropped normal laptops (luckily from a lower height).

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JDiaz replied on Tue, Dec 6 2011 11:54 PM

Thinkpads are naturally tougher than most laptops, Dell standards have gone down and shouldn't be compared to Lenovo, and you'll be surprised at how quickly kids adapt to the Trackpoint and Touchpad layout.

Though the Trackpoint basically is mainly a good feature for typists, since it's easier for moving the cursor without having to fully move your hands away from the keyboard and then back again as you would with the Touchpad.

While the touchpad is multi-touch and that means you usually won't need to press the left/right buttons. So even for non-typists it shouldn't be a issue.

Worse case, it'll be no harder getting use to than a scroll wheel mouse and they include those with most kids specific computers.

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JDiaz:

Thinkpads are naturally tougher than most laptops, Dell standards have gone down and shouldn't be compared to Lenovo, and you'll be surprised at how quickly kids adapt to the Trackpoint and Touchpad layout.

Though the Trackpoint basically is mainly a good feature for typists, since it's easier for moving the cursor without having to fully move your hands away from the keyboard and then back again as you would with the Touchpad.

While the touchpad is multi-touch and that means you usually won't need to press the left/right buttons. So even for non-typists it shouldn't be a issue.

Worse case, it'll be no harder getting use to than a scroll wheel mouse and they include those with most kids specific computers.

While I will agree with you that Lenovo makes a better quality machine than Dell at this point. The track point is not something that kids will adapt to easily and is simply another point of failure. I work in a program with 800 middle school aged children who each have a laptop and simple things like tap to click causes all kinds of issue for most students and has to be turned off there is something to be said for physical buttons in the correct position. I feel like with an 11.6 in screen they could have easily put two sets of buttons in to give users an option of how they want to click. My work provided laptop has a trackpoint which I never use and has two sets of buttons one for the touchpad and one for the trackpoint and that is a better system IMHO. Also buying machine in bulk typically manufacturers don't include those extras such as external mice.

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JDiaz replied on Mon, Dec 12 2011 1:37 AM

Buttons in the correct position is relative to what people are use to. Kids are usually not use to anything yet and so they adapt much faster than adults. But kids also lack accuracy of movements that familiarity and developed skill helps induce.

So one thing to keep in mind is kids often use both hands and that often makes it irrelevant for where the buttons are located. The kids just has to get use to where they are located to know where to reach without looking.

Though if your school has typing classes then those students will probably quickly pick up on the trackpoint. Since as I pointed out it's main advantage is for typists and Thinkpads are intended mainly as content creation devices.

What you could consider is just buying mouses in bulk as well. It's actually the smart move because it helps reduce wear on the laptops, especially with how dirty kids hands can get. While simple wired USB mouses are very cheap and easy to replace, along with being easy for the kids to figure out how to attach and use as needed without any worry of configuring or worry of losing the dongle. Also buying them separately helps as they're likely to get the brunt of the abuse and need replacing more often.

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CBilotta replied on Tue, Dec 13 2011 11:47 PM

I have to say I was never a big fan of Lenovo or really ever had considered to buy one. I was so READY to buy a Mac and then by chance I stumbled upon the Thinkpad x1. I've had it for about a month and a 1/2 and I'm thoroughly IMPRESSED. The rapid charge is AMAZING! On top of that the Corning Gorilla Glass doesn't scratch and is pretty much unbreakable. Did anyone see the video's on youtube of the kid jumping on his trampoline with his lenovo? I really can't believe that Apple had Corning Gorilla Glass under their noses the whole time and didn't use it for their products... Amazes me considering the only major fault in apple's products is their screens. Lenovo's definitely taking over... I know my computer's not the exact model your talking about, but if that model's even built 1/2 as well as mine its worth it weight in gold.Surprise

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