Amazon.de Allows Self-Publishing To Kindle E-Book Store

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News Posted: Fri, Apr 22 2011 5:55 AM
There's been quite a heavy flow of Kindle-related news this week, hitting just as rumors started flying that the company behind it may be interested in doing their own tablet, too. Amazon has just introduced a new Direct Publishing model that will allow authors and publishers to independently publish their books in the Amazon.de Kindle Store. What's odd is that this is starting in Germany, but maybe the company's using that nation as a launching pad, and maybe even a test bed.

The split is easy to remember: authors will earn 70% royalty on sales to Kindle customers in Germany and Austria, which mirrors the 70/30 split largely pioneered in Apple's App Store. Authors who choose this will have a huge audience; the Kindle e-book store can be accessed not only on the Kindle itself, but also on a ton of other devices and computers. German-language authors and publishers can utilize the new German KDP website to make their books available in Germany, Austria, the U.K., U.S. and over 100 countries worldwide. The popular KDP 70% royalty option, which allows authors and publishers worldwide to make more money on books sold to Kindle customers in the U.S., U.K. and Canada, is now also available for books sold in Germany and Austria. Additionally, publishers can now receive their payment in either Euros, British pounds or U.S. dollars.

The Amazon.de Kindle Store serves customers in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Luxembourg, but we have no doubt that it'll hit other nations shortly. And so, the next generation of Kindle begins -- powered by you.

Kindle Direct Publishing Now Enables Authors and Publishers to Independently Publish Their Books in the Amazon.de Kindle Store

Authors and publishers can now earn 70% royalty on sales to Kindle customers in Germany and Austria

LUXEMBOURG--(BUSINESS WIRE)--(NASDAQ:AMZN)—Amazon.de today announced that authors and publishers worldwide are now able to make their books available in the Amazon.de Kindle Store (www.amazon.de/kindlebuecher) using the Kindle Direct Publishing (http://kdp.amazon.de) service. Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) is a fast and easy way for publishers and authors to start selling to Kindle customers worldwide via Kindle, Kindle 3G, Kindle DX, iPad, iPod touch, iPhone, PC, Mac and Android-based devices.

    “German publishers and authors can now take advantage of Kindle Direct Publishing to reach a wider audience and make more money on every book sold”

German-language authors and publishers can utilize the new German KDP website to make their books available in Germany, Austria, the U.K., U.S. and over 100 countries worldwide. The popular KDP 70% royalty option, which allows authors and publishers worldwide to make more money on books sold to Kindle customers in the U.S., U.K. and Canada, is now also available for books sold in Germany and Austria. Additionally, publishers can now receive their payment in either Euros, British pounds or U.S. dollars. For more information and program terms, please visit http://kdp.amazon.de.

“German publishers and authors can now take advantage of Kindle Direct Publishing to reach a wider audience and make more money on every book sold,” said Greg Greeley, vice president, European Retail. “U.S. and U.K. authors have had tremendous success with KDP and we’re hopeful German authors and publishers will take advantage of both the increased reach and revenue that KDP has to offer.”

The Amazon.de Kindle Store serves customers in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Luxembourg. To learn more about Kindle Direct Publishing, visit http://kdp.amazon.de. The Amazon.de Kindle Store has the largest selection of ebooks including more than 650,000 titles, 71 of 100 online Spiegel bestsellers, and over 25,000 German-language titles with thousands of German classics downloadable for free only on Kindle. 
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Very cool, I wonder what the legal ramifications are for Amazon if someone publishes copyrighted material in their name without permission. I would think that responsibility would fall on the person publishing the material illegally but I am no lawyer.

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Yeah I'm assuming there is an agreement that you sign that basically says Amazon isn't responsible for any of that, they are just a tool to get your work to the masses. I wonder how the publishers feel about this move by amazon.

Now you're just mashing it!

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HHGrrl replied on Mon, Apr 25 2011 10:04 PM

Although I like the idea of writers being able to publish their own work, I wonder if there will be a lot of junk/clutter in the Kindle store as a result of this.

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