Google Is Negotiating With Television Networks

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News Posted: Fri, Oct 22 2010 3:10 PM

Networks may be blocking Google TV for now, but it should come as no surprise that Google is quickly working to try to negotiate with television networks in order to gain access to shows. According to Reuters, a source familiar with the matter said Google is actively negotiating with three television networks that have blocked access to their websites on Google TV.

As you'll recall, three of the nation's largest TV broadcasters have blocked the Web-based versions of their shows from being viewed through Google's Web TV service. Currently, Walt Disney Co (owners of ABC and ESPN), CBS, and NBC Universal are blocking access from Google TV. Fox has not yet decided whether or not it will block access to its shows.

Given the amount of ad revenue that Google could potentially gain from its TV service, the company certainly has some incentive to work with the television networks. As it currently stands, HBO has said it will offer access to hundreds of hours of its programming to existing subscribers through Google TV. Turner Broadcasting, which includes TBS, TNT, and CNN, has optimized some of its websites for Google TV.

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3vi1 replied on Sat, Oct 23 2010 5:59 PM

Here's what's wrong with this:

What if television networks decided to block you not for a technical reason, but simply because you used Firefox, or Opera, or even IE?

Google TV is just another browser! The same goes for Boxee and XBMC.

This is greed by the networks. They *already* get paid by the number of viewers, but they want to double-dip and get paid by the people making set-top boxes and software as well.

Boycott them. If they don't want their stuff on GoogleTV, simply don't watch them.

If I were Google, I'd work around the issue by sending a user-agent string that makes them think I'm just another IE user.  There's no law that says your browser must advertise it's real name to a website - it's just courtesy.

What part of "Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn" don't you understand?

++++++++++++[>++++>+++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>+++.>++++++++++.-------------.+++.>---.>--.

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3vi1:
If I were Google, I'd work around the issue by sending a user-agent string that makes them think I'm just another IE user.  There's no law that says your browser must advertise it's real name to a website - it's just courtesy.

Pretty much what I suggested in the other thread about this. Seems like such a simple solution, though it would piss the networks off to no end.

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