AMD Not Rushing Into Tablet PC Chip Market, Focusing Instead On Netbooks

rated by 0 users
This post has 4 Replies | 1 Follower

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 26,482
Points 1,196,265
Joined: Sep 2007
ForumsAdministrator
News Posted: Sun, Jun 6 2010 7:54 PM
At Computex this past week, no fewer than 12 new tablet PCs wereintroduced, or at least showcased behind glass for the first time.That's a lot of iPad competition, and while most of them won't beshipping for at least a few months, there's no doubt that Apple has ahuge target on their back. Most of these tablets ran either Android orWindows 7, but only time will tell how well either of those systems cando on a tablet form factor. But aside from the software story, there's arather large hardware story as well. Many of these tablets were shownat Intel's booth, and while a few had chips from ARM and Qualcomm, it'sclear that Intel doesn't plan on being left out. After all, that's whythey introduced "Oak Trail."

But if Intel's getting into the tablet PC chip game, doesn't that meanthat their main rival in the consumer realm should be following closelybehind? Not so fast. According to general manager of Products Group RickBergman, AMD isn't really in a hurry to follow the leader and playbandwagon chaser. The company views the new tablet market as a growingone, with an unsettled ecosystem and a questionable future. Bergmanstated that his company is "still evaluating the tablet PC market andwill wait until market demandstarts to appear before joining," commenting that AMD plans to gofull-throttle into the netbook market in the time being.


We know some of you may be shocked to hear the news, or downright angrythat AMD is ignoring such a huge potential market. But should you be?AMD has followed Intel for a long while, often times coming up withchips that are "too little, too late." Those kinds of mistakes arecostly, and chasing a tail around hinders a company's ability to focuson a core set of products that they can innovate on. On that note, we'reglad to see AMD holding back. The netbook market is clearly moreproven, and if AMD can get a foothold in that with their Fusion APU,they could begin raking in cash for use in R&D elsewhere. AMDdoesn't really have the resources that Intel does to chase every rabbitdown their hole, and we're glad to see the company taking a step backand closely evaluating this decision. In the long run, AMD may be ableto pull ahead elsewhere as it focuses on other key areas while Inteltries to catch up in the tablet market place. We'll see who was right ina year or two, most likely.
  • | Post Points: 65
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 4,839
Points 45,835
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Kennesaw
rapid1 replied on Sun, Jun 6 2010 10:50 PM

I agree with some of what this article states, but it is self refuting. Intel already owns the netbook market, and has a combination CPU/GPU on the market. So they will just be cleaning up the scraps as usual as far as I see it. That is unless the can do something innovative again like they did with there 3rd gen chips back in the day. On a performance level I could see that happening because just like then (or with that specific iteration of the Pentium's) the Atom is the market leader in netbooks, but mainly because it is the only one there. The Atom while somewhat sufficient burns no fast paths to much of anywhere, it is basically sufficient and that is all.

ASUS Z87C
i7-4770K
Xonar DGX
Intel Gigabit CT
Geforce GTX 770 4GB
G.Skill X1600/1754 2x8GB 7/8/8/24
  • | Post Points: 5
Top 75 Contributor
Posts 1,809
Points 18,105
Joined: May 2009
Location: Waikiki

I really don't know what AMD has been thinking in their business practices lately!

They seem to be following the HUB plan!

Why would they try and hold onto a dying market in the face of tablet/Pads. Instead of just spilling the recourse's and seeing which one will pan out! The Netbook production is stable and can be produced along with demand. It can also be in conjunction with the Tablet processors.

It almost seems like they now have adopted that elitist-entitlement mentality of business. That they are to big to fail, so lets bend everyone over and they will take what we tell them to!

It is obvious that they put out that whole campaign of "we care about our customers", yet when it comes to listening to what they want. That is not the way it is going to be. Like Peter Griffin says about Kobe, whether you want it or not, either way it is going to happen!:P

Intel Core i7-875K Quad
Asetek 510LC 120MM
4GB Kingston Hyper-X DDR-3
ASUS P7P55D-E Pro
CyberPower 800 PSU
Kingston 64GB SSD 
2 Hitachi 1-TB HDD'S
FirePro V8800
8X Blu-Ray DVD±R/±RW
HPw2207 22" LCD
Cintiq 21UX
CoolerMaster 690II Advance
Win 7 Pro 64 bit
Special thanks to HotHardware.com!
  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Posts 8,705
Points 104,490
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
MembershipAdministrator
Moderator
realneil replied on Mon, Jun 7 2010 11:08 AM

I'm all for their participation in any market they choose to dabble in. Why?

Because they effect prices in the marketplace. They may not dominate a market segment, but they always offer competing products at truly affordable prices, forcing the other guys to react with better prices too.

AMD is a company worth having around and I support them whenever I can.

Dogs are great judges of character, and if your dog doesn't like somebody being around, you shouldn't trust them.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 75 Contributor
Posts 1,809
Points 18,105
Joined: May 2009
Location: Waikiki
Yeah Neil I use to support them as well. Yet I feel they should all really set up their production to support the market that supports them.
 
I have always gotten flack for that from my friends, because they feel it is not free market thinking and they have a right to make money for themselves. I always have felt that outsourcing is modern day slavery. which only helps in destroying local markets.
 
For example like Clone Wars and Garfield, the production is overseas, yet they play to local markets for their profit margins. When they could be produced here providing jobs and infrastructure to local economies instead of dismantling them.
 
Now AMD is doing the same and not listening to the demands of the market and producing product ahead of demand. I hope they do produce all those netbooks and learn their lesson when they don't sell, and the tablets take off.
Intel Core i7-875K Quad
Asetek 510LC 120MM
4GB Kingston Hyper-X DDR-3
ASUS P7P55D-E Pro
CyberPower 800 PSU
Kingston 64GB SSD 
2 Hitachi 1-TB HDD'S
FirePro V8800
8X Blu-Ray DVD±R/±RW
HPw2207 22" LCD
Cintiq 21UX
CoolerMaster 690II Advance
Win 7 Pro 64 bit
Special thanks to HotHardware.com!
  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (5 items) | RSS