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Nintendo Plans DS Invasion In Schools: The Future Of Learning Is Gaming

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News Posted: Fri, Mar 19 2010 11:47 PM
Uniforms, tighter schedules, banning of cellphones; could school possibly get any less organized? We're sure it could, but the higher-ups at Nintendo want to affect schools in a positive way by introducing their products into them, of course.  We have previously heard of Dance Dance Revolution being used in select Physical Education programs in order to get students to become active when they otherwise wouldn't, but we have yet to hear of any school making a sweeping measure to accept gaming consoles as a part of their teachings.

 
Nintendo Game Designer, Shigeru Miyamoto
credit:  Associated Press

Shigeru Miyamoto, who has had a hand in some of Nintendo's most popular titles, recently offered that he is working hard to turn Nintendo's DS line of handheld gaming machines into tools for schools. The DS already has a nice line of educational software titles that help users learn, and he thinks that this could really be a huge benefit to schools looking for alternative ways to educate students of a new generation. The company has already managed to get them into Japanese schools (Junior High and Elementary levels) starting in the new school year, but that's obviously just scratching the surface.  Details about Nintendo's plan for the education sector were short, but it's not tough to envision the company making an impact.  The DS is a fun, interactive console that's relatively cheap and easy to grasp.

It wouldn't take long for the relatively small population of students that haven't had hands-on time with the system, to learn how to use it.  And of course, with so many brain games already out, the overall software model certainly wouldn't be an issue.


Personally, we love the idea. School has been the same, mundane process for far too long, and it's time for new technologies to enter in and shake things up. Wouldn't you be more inclined to pay attention if the teacher shoved a DS in your face and told you that your grade depended on it?  That could be just a little more interesting than yet another multiple choice, fill in the bubble exam.  Just make sure to keep that battery charged.
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RyuGTX replied on Sat, Mar 20 2010 5:21 AM

I wonder what other subjects it could be used for? I don't think I want to do something like calculus on this thing.

 

I think it would be pretty cool if you could program your own flash cards for various subjects. Would be really helpful in subjects like foreign language (vocab, characters, etc).

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la_guy_10 replied on Sat, Mar 20 2010 4:24 PM

I do not think this will go over well in the U.S. You break out a Nintendo of any kind and kids will think it is a slumber party!!!!!!! The concept is nice, I just do not think the we are ready or ever will be to go down this path. Although the leapfrog was a great educational tool i'm told, the concept of games and education just does not seem conducive to learning.

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Inspector replied on Sat, Mar 20 2010 7:10 PM

In the U.S all you would get if they did this is going to be no one paying attention :P.

For social studies use a war game to teach war and Assassins creed for history stuff xD

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Cheezit replied on Sat, Mar 20 2010 10:15 PM

Its not that were not ready for this in the U.S. Its the unions and administration that would claim its getting rid of jobs and is detrimental to the education process. You honestly don't believe the bmw driving principal and the rest of the faculty would take a cut in benefits for your children do you?

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la_guy_10 replied on Sat, Mar 20 2010 10:43 PM

I don't know bro I think you took what I said out of context, I was simply saying that children and Nintendo's would not be good for learning in the U.S. Other countries could probable make it beneficial but here in the U.S. I could not see it working. I do not have kids yet, but as far as a principle and the faculty and what vehicle they drive I sure hope that has no bearing on my child's learning or I'm in trouble.

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Inspector replied on Sat, Mar 20 2010 11:21 PM

That was just my opinion and a response to your reply, it was not meant to add on to your comment.

Cheezit, there is still going to be a need for teachers to watch the kids :D lol, I agree that adding gaming consoles to teach is detrimental to the education process though. Im just saying as a student myself that i would so be doing more gaming then learning, this is the same for laptops (which i would rather use then a console Smile) Im not sure about other places but in NYC they don't have enough money to give everyone a laptop or a console to use for class. :(

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RyuGTX replied on Sun, Mar 21 2010 12:21 AM

Even though it isn't a gaming console, I know of a middle school were laptops were required. I'm sure a lot of people did some sort of gaming (even if it was those casual online games). Not sure how well it worked, but they are still employing that requirement. This was one of those rich schools. So it could just work in certain environments (school environments and not necessarily based on the country).

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tjmeister replied on Sun, Mar 21 2010 9:22 AM

Perhaps a little late to the market, but if handled properly, it would be possible to build a nice core set of products (graphing-calc/symbolic computation/dynamic geometry/physics simulation/data capture interface/augmented reality and more) This along with already present wireless web/mesh networking and camera (in Dsi) would make a pretty powerful learning platform. I would be paying close attention If I was Texas Instruments (they have had a pretty easy run in this market for years). I doubt they will go that route though, probably stick to the gaming angle which would be too bad.

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This is a really good concept. My only concern is how would you get kids to actually use it for study?

Having worked on many of the early Leap pad's, I feel it is always a good idea to use things that are fun and interesting to kids. If they are going to introduce these to schools in a locked format that can only be used with required curriculum. It would probably prove difficult if kids are required to bring their own DS. Then they would probably be playing games all day.

This program would be very efficient, since it would teach kids in combination with hand-eye coordination and visual stimuli.

Now we just need to make sure they don't put web-cams on them :P

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wouldn't do well in some parts of the usa cause of lazy people or people who just dont care so they would play games on the dang things!!

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RyuGTX replied on Mon, Mar 22 2010 12:26 AM

BurgendyBlues:

I'm so with you on that, you never know if these kids are really going to use it for those purposes. I think the ds has the ability to connect wirelessly to an internet connection or interact with other DS'. So maybe the teacher has one and can see whether each student is connected in or is using the educational software, maybe even track how long they've been using it at home and at school so that you know if they did their work or not.

Parents could also figure out whether little Toshi is actually doing his school work on the DS or whether he's playing a game.

 

 

A teach could just walk around the class room.

 

I still think that if a school implements this, it is going to be some elite school. There is no reason of a school who has a rather low educational curriculum to spend the time and money to implement this.

 

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kulocka replied on Mon, Mar 22 2010 3:07 AM

i cant wait till they start bringing wiids to school LOLOLOL

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Seeing as how I've never seen a Calculus or U.S. Government learning game on the DS, I'd be out of the loop, but I'd love to hear my niece say that she learned a bunch of new things in school while playing her Nintendo DS. I'm sure it'll be hell trying to get these into American schools, seeing as how PTA organizations love to get their panties in a knot about nearly everything, but honestly, playing DS in school to assist learning is a brilliant idea.

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