Corsair Debuts Air Series A50 And A70 CPU Coolers

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CeBIT is just starting to heat up in Germany, but Corsair has a mind to keep things on ice. Aside from launching a new USB 2.0 thumb drive, the accessory maker has also introduced the Corsair Cooling Air Series A70 and A50 CPU coolers, with the former designed for those "looking to squeeze every last megahertz of performance out of their high-end Intel and AMD processors, without sacrificing low noise levels." The A50 line, on the other hand, is more for those who have yet to really jump on the overclocking bandwagon, or as Corsair puts it, it's designed for "PC builders and hobbyists who want to upgrade from the stock Intel and AMD coolers."



The Air Series A70 utilizes four direct-contact 8mm copper heat pipes, integrated into a highly-polished aluminum base placed directly on the CPU for maximum heat dissipation. Two dual-speed 120mm fans, arranged in a “Push-Pull” configuration, are attached to the all-aluminum cooling fin assembly with noise- and vibration-reducing rubber mounts. The result is superior cooling performance with minimal fan noise.The Corsair Cooling Air Series A50 employs a compact design with three 8mm heat pipes integrated into a base placed in direct contact with the CPU. The A50 uses a single 120mm cooling fan with rubber mounts to reduce noise and vibration, and you'll be glad to know that both the Air Series A70 and Air Series A50 are compatible with all current CPU socket designs, including Intel LGA775, LGA1156, and LGA1366, and AMD Socket AM2 and Socket AM3.

Unfortunately, pricing and release details have yet to be made public.



Corsair® Launches Air Series A70 and A50 High-Performance CPU Coolers

- New heat pipe CPU coolers join the award-winning Hydro Series H50 -

Hannover, Germany. March 2, 2010 — Corsair, a worldwide leader in high-performance computer and flash memory products, announces the Corsair Cooling™ Air Series A70 and A50 high-performance CPU coolers, the newest additions to Corsair’s award-winning range of cooling solutions.

The Corsair Cooling Air Series A70 has been designed to offer exceptional cooling performance for enthusiasts who demand state-of-the-art CPU temperature management. The Air Series A70 is a great choice for enthusiasts looking to squeeze every last megahertz of performance out of their high-end Intel® and AMD™ processors, without sacrificing low noise levels.

The Corsair Cooling Air Series A50 is ideal for PC builders and hobbyists who want to upgrade from the stock Intel and AMD coolers. The Air Series A50 delivers significantly lower CPU temperatures than stock coolers, resulting in a cooler, quieter, and more reliable PC, with increased overclocking headroom.

“The Corsair Cooling Hydro Series H50 brought a new level of performance, design, expertise, and ease of installation to the CPU cooling market.  Our all–new Air Series was designed with the same goals in mind.” said Jim Carlton, VP of Marketing for Corsair.  “The Air Series A50 and A70 expand our CPU cooling line with class-leading performance that satisfies not only extreme performance enthusiasts, but anyone who understands that improved CPU cooling provides additional performance and stability, as well as enhanced protection from the damage heat can cause to their CPU.”

The Air Series A70 utilizes four direct-contact 8mm copper heat pipes, integrated into a highly-polished aluminum base placed directly on the CPU for maximum heat dissipation. Two dual-speed 120mm fans, arranged in a “Push-Pull” configuration, are attached to the all-aluminum cooling fin assembly with noise- and vibration-reducing rubber mounts. The result is superior cooling performance with minimal fan noise.

The Corsair Cooling Air Series A50 employs a compact design with three 8mm heat pipes integrated into a base placed in direct contact with the CPU. The A50 uses a single 120mm cooling fan with rubber mounts to reduce noise and vibration.

Both the Air Series A70 and Air Series A50 are compatible with all current CPU socket designs, including Intel LGA775, LGA1156, and LGA1366, and AMD Socket AM2 and Socket AM3.

The Air Series A70 and A50 are supplied with a Two Year limited warranty, and are backed up by Corsair’s legendary customer service and technical support.

For more information on Corsair Cooling Air Series A70 and A50 CPU coolers, please visit: www.corsair.com/products/casescooling_home.aspx.

About Corsair
Founded in 1994, Corsair specializes in premium, high-performance peripherals and components for personal computers. Corsair’s award-winning products are the delight of the world’s most demanding hardware enthusiasts. For more information, visit corsair.com.

Copyright© 2010 Corsair. All rights reserved. All company and/or product names may be trade names, trademarks, and/or registered trademarks of the respective owners with which they are associated. Features, pricing, availability, and specifications are subject to change without notice.
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rapid1 replied on Tue, Mar 2 2010 1:48 PM

It looks nice, but from and based on the competition I would say the body is somewhat small in comparison. The 120 fans are larger than the ribbed or main heat absorption, and dissipation unit. It may be competitive to a point, although I doubt it will match any of the monster towers effectively.

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RyuGTX replied on Wed, Mar 3 2010 12:25 AM

As for as matching with the other monster towers, I don't think it has to. Their H50 water cooling kit is already at that price point of those huge heatsinks. Therefore, I think it is safe to assume that these air coolers will be positioned below the $80 price point.

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realneil replied on Wed, Mar 3 2010 10:25 AM

If they were not priced far below the water cooler then there would be no reason to buy them instead of it. My little water cooler is an Asetek LCLC and I think that they make the Corsair cooler for them. It isn't sold retail in most places but you can search and find one if you want to. It works the same and is sold for less money too.

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ClemSnide replied on Wed, Mar 3 2010 11:03 AM

I'd be interested in hearing your experiences with the Asetek, Realneil; it was one of the ones I considered.

But I went with the Megahalems and a Noctua fan that matched it nicely. I figured I wasn't going to OC enough to really need water cooling and the price (and slightly greater bother) it entailed.

One thing to watch with any of these large-size HSFs is RAM clearance. I have a thread in the Tech Support forum here about the conflicts between the CPU's heatsink (actually the fan is the culprit) and the RAM heatsink fins. I solved it by bending the pins on hte RAM's heat shield down on the one module that sat underneath the fan. No problems so far, but then, my room temperature is 40° F.


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Something tells me the performance won't be entirely great on this bad boy.As much as I like Corsair products, they made one mistake with the cooling pipes. Each pipe should be offset from the other in its line, in order to increase surface area for the heat to dissipate better. Additionally, I think they could have done better aesthetically.

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rapid1 replied on Wed, Mar 3 2010 4:52 PM

I agree with you mental the product just seems kind of lacking to me Vs. others available. I also wanted to ask a question Clem on the Megahalem. I have not used one personally, and partially because of my fears on the RAM clearance issue. how much clearance is there from the board to the bottom of the HSF, and is it rotatable or does it sit in a single position because of this. I currently am using a COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus, with 2 COOLER MASTER R4-L2R-20CG-GP 120mm Green LED Case Fan blowing front to back onto a 2 high RPM exhaust fan's. However the base of my unit is not flat as you will see if you look it up. The reviews I read on it prior to getting it generally said this was fine and in some cases better. I have not seen this to be true in general though.

So I am kind of looking around and deciding what I should do, as the CPU does run a little hot (32-46C). I was thinking of going for a Megahelm, a Tunic Tower, or a Xigmatech Monsoon III. Out of these products I was favoring the Megahelm.

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RyuGTX replied on Wed, Mar 3 2010 10:44 PM

rapid1:

I agree with you mental the product just seems kind of lacking to me Vs. others available. I also wanted to ask a question Clem on the Megahalem. I have not used one personally, and partially because of my fears on the RAM clearance issue. how much clearance is there from the board to the bottom of the HSF, and is it rotatable or does it sit in a single position because of this. I currently am using a COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus, with 2 COOLER MASTER R4-L2R-20CG-GP 120mm Green LED Case Fan blowing front to back onto a 2 high RPM exhaust fan's. However the base of my unit is not flat as you will see if you look it up. The reviews I read on it prior to getting it generally said this was fine and in some cases better. I have not seen this to be true in general though.

So I am kind of looking around and deciding what I should do, as the CPU does run a little hot (32-46C). I was thinking of going for a Megahelm, a Tunic Tower, or a Xigmatech Monsoon III. Out of these products I was favoring the Megahelm.

 

Your clearance issues can be answered by this picture that was posted on Prolimatech's website.

 

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ClemSnide:
I'd be interested in hearing your experiences with the Asetek, Realneil; it was one of the ones I considered.

The Asetek LCLC  runs my i7-870 at an average of 44c. On a stress test it went as high as 53c. (well within nominal operating temps) It was included as part of the system that I won here and it works as well as I could expect.

I was gonna buy another one for my new system but the funds were peaked out at the time. This one is a Core i5-750 and I'm using an ASRock P55-PRO mainboard with it. Once I had the parts and was ready to build it, I noticed that the ASRock board had two sets of holes for mounting the CPU cooler. I researched it and found that it accepts the regular LGA 1156 style of coolers, and also accepts LGA 775 coolers as well!  (a fine feature to build into their product if you ask me) Many of us already have great LGA 775 coolers that still work fine. So this gave me the chance to use a cooler that I had on the shelf that I had never even opened before.

It's made by Asetek too, and is called the Idea VapoChill MicroIdea This keeps the i5-750 running just as cool as the i7-870 is and that really surprised me. I will not be spending the money for the water cooler for this box because this one works perfectly.

 

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ClemSnide replied on Sun, Mar 7 2010 11:00 PM

@rapid1: I'm no expert when it comes to HSF design; mostly I just take the word of sites such as SilentPCreview. I'm not sure why the clearance issue wasn't addressed elsewhere. I can't have been the first person to install RAM with a tall heat sink underneath a massive CPU cooler!

DIMMs with a low-rise heatsink, such as some OCZ units, stick up just over an inch from the motherboarrd. That gives the Megahalems, in its usual position and with a fan sitting toward the front of the case relative to the CPU, about an eighth of an inch clearance. The Patriot memory I picked up (for a great price, I should mention) sits 2" tall. I bent the heatsink pins back on the DIMM that's directly underneath the Noctua fan. So far this hasn't caused instability, but of course when your room temperature is 40° F, overheating is not your greatest concern!

If I go to 8 GB of RAM, I'll have to do the same thing to one of the additional modules (and also take off the fan to snap it into place). 4 GB is doing me fine at the moment though.

The Megahalems can be rotated in 90° increments, but at 90 and 270°, the fan still impinges on the RAM slots. It's just the corner in those cases. You could also rotate it 180°, which would mean the fan was near to the rear of the case-- but since the rear fan is usually an exhaust, that might impact the case cooling as a whole. (Or it might not. Remember, I'm no expert.) I figured that the "traditional" mounting position of heat sink and fan are the standard for a reason, and though some people here suggested that I nibble away the lower part of the fan housing with a Dremel moto-tool, I believed that would cause more problems than it solved.

Time will tell whether the RAM overheats with my solution. If I was doing this again, I'd make sure that I got low-clearance memory sticks-- or use water cooling, which takes the whole cooling system away from the CPU.

Hope that helps and good luck to you!


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